Skip to main content

Full text of "1st to 5th Annual Reports of the Trustees of Massachusetts Hospitals for Comsumptives (1907-1911)"

See other formats


TSlx 

if 



Public Document 



No. 77 



FIRST REPORT 



OF THE 



Massachusetts Commission on Hospitals 
FOE Consumptives. 

1907. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Squaee. 
1908. 



FEB 111S21 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



COMMISSIOXEES. 



Arthur T. Cabot, 
Charles H. Adams. 
Alvah Crocker. 
Albert C. Getchell, M.D. 
Sylvia B. Knowlton. 

John B. Haaves, 2( 



M.D., Chairman. 

Wn^LiAM D. McFee, M.D. 
Charles H. Porter. 
Jeremiah Smith, Jr. 
W. C. Godfrey. 
I, M.D., Secretary. 



309 Ford Bcildi>'g, 15 Ashburtox Place, Boston. 



REPORT OF THE MASSACHUSETTS STATE COMMISSION 
ON HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIYES. 



To His Excellency the Governor of the Commonwealth and to the Honorable 

Council. 

In accordance with chapter 474 of the Acts of 1907, entitled 
*'An Act to provide for establishing three sanatoriums for 
tubercular patients," His Excellency Governor Guild ap- 
pointed Dr. Arthur T. Cabot, Charles H. Adams, Alvah 
Crocker, Dr. Albert C. Getchell, W. C. Godfrey, Mrs. Sylvia 
B. Knowlton, Dr. William D. McFee, Charles H. Porter and 
Jeremiah Smith, Jr., as a commission to build three sanato- 
riums for consumptives, one in the Connecticut valley, one in 
the northeastern part of the State and one in the southeastern 
part of the State. In addition to this, the commission was 
given the power to disseminate information throughout the 
State in regard to tuberculosis, and to establish dispensaries 
and out-patient departments as was thought best. 

The first meeting of the commission was held Sept. 2, 1907. 
Dr. Arthur T. Cabot of Boston was elected chairman, and Dr. 
John B. Ilawes of Boston was made secretary. 

In view of the permanent character of this Board and the 
wade scope of its work, it was thought best to provide work- 
ing quarters for the commission where information could be 
accumulated and put in accessible form, and in which the busi- 
ness of the undertaking could be conducted and recorded in 
orderly manner. Accordingly, an office Avas secured in the 
Ford building, 15 Ashburton Place, and suitable provisions 
made for carrying on the present work of the commission. 



6 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



At a regular meeting of the Board, held October 15, it was 
voted that the official name of this commission be the Massa- 
chusetts Commission on Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Small sub-committees were appointed to investigate sites 
for the three hospitals named in the act. It was decided that 
the plans of the hospital in the northeastern part of the State 
should first be tiiken up. 

In view of the fact that the superintendent of such a hospi- 
tal should be acquainted with all the details of his work from 
the very beginning, it was voted to select a suitable man as 
superintendent of this northeastern hospital at once, stating 
that his term of office will commence probably in the summer 
of 1908, but that he will be expected to keep in close touch 
with the building of the hospital, of which he is to be in 
charge, from the xevj beginning. The Board elected Dr. E. 
B. Emerson, at present assistant superintendent of the State 
Hospital at Tewksbury, who was highly recommended, and 
who has had long and thorough training in institutional work. 
Dr. Emerson has accepted this position. The salary agreed 
upon is §2,500 per annum, to begin when he takes actual 
charge of the work. 

- The sub-committee in charge of the northeastern hospital, 
consisting of Dr. Arthur T. Cabot and Mr. Alvah Crocker of 
Fitchburg, were requested to make a search for a suitable site 
for this hospital in that part of the State convenient to the cities 
of Lowell, Lawrence, Salem, Haverhill, Lynn, etc. 

The qualifications of a site for an institution for cases of ad- 
vanced or moderately advanced tuberculosis were considered 
by the Board. A moderate elevation of one hundred to three 
hundred feet, dry soil, a southerly exposure, and a certain 
amount of pine grove and shelter trees for protection were de- 
clared to be desirable. A tract of land comprising at least one 
hundred and fifty acres was thought necessary. Ease of access 
to the larger cities and towns in the region from which such 
a hospital would draw its patients was a prime qualification. 
Proper water supply and means of making a sewerage system 
in an efficient and economical way were important. 

Various sites were inspected in the region near Wilmington, 
Andover, Haverhill and Georgetown. At the regular meet- 



1907.] PUBLIC DOCr:MENT — Xo. 77. 



7 



ing of the commission, held November 111, the sub-committee 
on the sites for this northeastern hospital handed in its report. 
Dr. Emerson also gave a detailed description of the various 
sites. 

A certain piece of land near Georgetown, Mass., known as 
the '* Little Farm, was finally chosen as the best suited for 
the hospital. Power was given to the chairman to obtain an 
option on the land. After the option was obtained the mem- 
bers of the Board personally inspected the property, and voted 
to purchase it. 

This property consists of a large farm of one hundred and 
eighty-six acres, situated on a beautiful hill, fi'om which a mag- 
nificent view is obtained in all directions. A pine grove, a 
large apple orchard of young trees and an oak grove add to its 
attractions. There are two large houses on the property, in 
excellent condition, and an old barn. Much of the land is un- 
der cultivation, and the entire property has been well kept up 
as a farm. The top of the hill is about half a mile from the 
railroad. The elevation is over two hundred feet. An en- 
gineer has inspected this land, and is of the opinion that a 
water supply can be obtained near by. John A. Fox, the ar- 
chitect selected to make plans for this hospital, has been very 
favorablj" uu pressed by the site. Georgetown is within an 
hour's journey of Boston, and within easy reach of Haverhill, 
Lawrence, Lowell, Xewburyport, Salem and Lynn. 

The sub-committees on sites for hospitals in the Connecticut 
valley and the southeastern part of the State are investigating 
those regions. 

It was also ordered in the act (chapter 474, section 9) that 
this Board may disseminate information as to the best meth- 
ods of combating the disease." 

Taking up this part of its duties, the Board has arranged a 
plan for frequent short articles in the newspapers of the Com- 
monwealth. One bulletin has already been sent to one hun- 
dred and ninety-five newspapers and periodicals throughout 
the State, and the editors have shown a very general desire to 
co-operate with the commission in this effort. Other articles 
dealing with various phases of the tuberculosis question will 
follow at suitable intervals. 



8 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 1907. 



It is the opinion of the commission that the present appro- 
priation will be insufficient to complete the construction and 
furnishing of the liospitals called for. It is to be remembered 
that each hospital is to be provided not only with accommoda- 
tion for one hundred and fifty patients, but must also provide 
for the accommodation of the superintendent and his family, 
of his assistants, and of nurses and other help needed in the 
carrying on of the work, and must also include buildings for 
heating and supplying power. A proper water supply and 
sewerage system are of the greatest importance ; this will be 
a source of considerable expense. 

It is hoped that before the Legislature is ready to take up a 
consideration of this report the commission will be able to 
supply more accurate data in regard to the probable expense 
of the undertaking. 

The commission would respectfully suggest that, as it may 
become absolutely necessar}^ to acquire certain tracts of land 
for a Avater supply or for other purposes, this Board be given 
power to take such land as it may deem necessary by right of 
eminent domain. 

Disbursements to Nov. 30, 1907, are as follows : — 

Salary of secretary (at f 1,500 per year), $250 00 

Salary of stenographer (at 1850 per year), .... 141 66 

Rent of office (at |725 per year), 151 05 

Running expenses, etc., 622 58 

$1,165 29 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR T. CABOT. 



Boston, Mass., Nov. 30, 1907. 



Public Document 



No. 77 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Commission on Hospitals 
FOE Consumptives. 



November 30, 1908. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1909. 



Appro^-ed by 
The State Board of Publication. 



COMMISSIONERS. 



Arthur T. Cabot, M.D., Chairman. 
Charles H. Adams. William D. McFee, M. 

Alvah Crocker. Charles H. Porter. 

Albert C. Getchell, M.D. Jeremiah Smith, Jr. 

Sylvia B. Knowlton. William C. Godfrey. 



John B. Hawes, 2d, M.D., Secretary. 



3 Joy Street, Boston. 



REPORT OF THE MASSACHUSETTS STATE COMMISSION 
ON HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



To His Excellency the Governor of the Commonwealth and to the 
Honorable Council. 

In accordance with the terms of the act establishing this 
-commission (chapter 474 of the Acts of 1907), this Board has 
now secured three tracts of land as sites for the three hospitals 
which it is to bnild. 

^N'ORTHEASTEEI^ HoSPITAL. 

The Georgetown property mentioned in our last report was 
given up partly on account of the determined opposition of the 
townspeople and also on account of the lack of a sufficient 
supply of water on the property itself ; for, in view of the feel- 
ing in the town, we feared difficulty and delay in arranging 
with the town for a joint supply. The commission therefore 
accepted the offer of the people of Georgetown to take the option 
off its hands, and at once turned to a piece of property in [N'orth 
Reading which had already been examined and found favorable. 
After considerable delay, owing to the fact that the owners were 
not anxious to sell, this property, consisting of 101 acres, with 
a small house and barn, was secured for $5,000. It is con- 
veniently situated on the Wilmington branch of the Boston & 
Maine Railroad, and lies not far from the Boston & Northern 
line of electrics. The land is of moderate elevation, southerly 
exposure, well wooded and of gravelly soil. Competent 
engineers have stated that there is abundant water supply, and 
that the opportunities for proper sewage disposal are excellent. 



6 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



The plans, which had already been much studied, were now 
perfected and adapted to this site, under direction of Dr. E. B. 
Emerson, superintendent of the Northeastern Hospital, late 
of the State Hospital at Tewksbury. As soon as they were 
ready an estimate of cost was obtained, and after much study 
and readjustment of parts and simplification of detail it was 
found that the cost could in all probability be brought within 
the appropriation. On Aug. 19, 1908, these plans were sub- 
mitted to Lieutenant-Governor Dra^Der, then acting as Governor, 
and to the Council, and were accepted by them. The contract 
for constructing the buildings of this hospital has been awarded 
to the firm of Hardy & Cole of Andover, for the sum of $54,010. 
It calls for the completion of the work by July 1, 1909. Other 
contracts for plumbing, heating, etc., will be awarded inde- 
jDendently. 

The hospital will consist of a group of eight buildings. A 
three-story administration and domestic building will be the" 
central figure of this group. This will be of wood, and will 
contain the superintendent's offices and living rooms, the dining 
rooms for patients and for nurses and officers, kitchen, store- 
rooms, offices and bedrooms. On either side of this, arranged 
as symmetrically as the grounds will permit, will be the two 
closed wards for the very sick patients ; there will be rooms in 
these buildings for nurses, entirely separate, however, from 
the rooms occupied by patients, and reached by a separate stair- 
case. The wards will be simple one-story structures, so built 
that the patients' beds can be easily rolled out on to the piazza 
in pleasant weather. Beyond these wards will be placed the 
open pavilions for the less advanced cases. The patients in 
these pavilions, while they have warm dressing and locker 
rooms, sleep practically in the open air, the southern side of 
each pavilion being entirely open. The abundant growth of 
pines and other trees screen the wards from the cold winds and 
from observation, and will make it possible to provide many 
pleasant and attractive seats where patients who are able to do 
so can spend their days in the open air. At some distance from 
these main buildings will be the heat, light and power plant 
and the pumping station. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



— No. 77. 



7 



SOUTHEASTERX HoSPITAL. 

For the hospital in southeastern Massachusetts, after a thor- 
ough investigation of the central portion of this region, the 
commission selected a tract of land in Lakeville, just outside of 
the town of Middleborough, on the trolley line between Middle- 
borough and Xew Bedford, and within a mile of the Middle- 
borough station. This land, known as the Doggett estate, con- 
sists of some 75 acres of land, of good quality, sloping south, 
sparsely wooded, with abundant facilities for the disposal of 
sewage and for obtaining a water supply. This property was 
purchased for $4,125. Dr. Sumner Coolidge of Watertown, 
who for the last three or four years has been with Dr. Gorgas, 
chief of the medical department of Panama, has been appointed 
superintendent of this hospital. The land has been surveyed 
and plans for this hospital prepared, which have been approved 
by the Governor and his Council. It is expected that contracts^, 
for building this hospital will be awarded in the near future. 

The plans for this hospital call for three large buildings, — 
the administration building, containing offices, rooms for the 
superintendent and assistants, dining rooms, and two large ward 
buildings, one for men and one for women, which together will 
hold all the patients which the hospital is to accommodate. 
These ward buildings will each contain two closed wards for 
the very sick patients, and two open wards or pavilions for 
those patients in the earlier stages of the disease. In addition 
to this, there will be a building for power, lighting and heating, 
with laundry attached. 

Westekx Hospital. 
An extensive survey of sites in the western part of the State 
has been made, with the result that a tract of land kno^\Ti as the 
Huot property, in the town of Westfield, on the Springfield & 
Westfield electric line, was secured. This property consists of 
a large tract of some 128 acres, partly wooded and partly 
under cultivation, with a large barn and a house in good 
repair. This land was purchased for $6,000. The land is 
high, slopes to the south, has a good water supply, and com- 
mands a fine view of the Westfield River valley. The tracks of 



8 HOSPITALS FOR CONST JjMPTI YES. [Dec. 



the Boston & Albany Railroad touch this Westfield property, 
and there is on the grounds a spur track which will be of great 
assistance in bringing building materials and supplies. Dr. 
Henry D. Chadwick. formerly a practising physician of Wal- 
tham, Mass., and until now superintendent of the Vermont 
State Sanatorium, has been appointed superintendent of the 
hospital to be built here, and is at work on the plans. 

On October 15 the Board changed its offices from the Ford 
Building to the Twentieth Century Club Building, 3 Joy 
Street. 

Disbursements have been as follows : — 



To Nov. 30, 1907. . 

To Nov. 30, 1908, as follows : 
Salary of secretary. . 
Salaiy of stenograi^her. 

^ Rent of offices, . 

Running expenses, etc.. 
Northeastern Hospital, 
Southeastern Hospital, 
Western Hospital. 



$1,093 66 



Original appropriation. 
Disbursements. . 



$1,500 00 

S49 99 

691 S3 

715 03 

S.SSO 30 

4,505 63 

6.240 38 



23,386 16 
$24,479 82 

$300,000 00 
24.479 82 



Balance, $275,520 18 



Section 9 of the act establishing this commission states that : 
They may also establish out-patient departments, and may 
disseminate information as to the best methods of combating the 
disease." The work done by this Board along these lines has 
been largely a campaign of publicity. From time to time dur- 
ing the past year the Board has drawn up short bulletins on 
subjects of timely interest as regards tul>erculosis and its pre- 
vention, and has sent copies of these to 195 newspapers, daily, 
weeklv and reli2:ious, in this State. These bulletins have been 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 77. 



9 



printed extensively throughout Massachusetts. The subjects 
touched upon during the past year have been as follows: The 
Need of forming Dispensaries and Clinics for the Tuberculous ; 
Tuberculosis Classes in Boston; Day Camps for Tuberculosis; 
Tuberculosis in Factories and Stores; The International Con- 
gress on Tuberculosis, etc. The fact that this commission 
expects to be a disseminating center and source of information 
on all matters pertaining to the tuberculosis campaign has been 
widely advertised, and as a result inquiries of various kinds in 
regard to this question have been received from all parts of the 
State and from outside the State. These have in every case 
been answered in as full and satisfactory a manner as possible. 

In addition to this, the chairman and secretary of this Board 
have spoken at numerous public meetings which have been held 
by various District Committees of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society, in connection with the tuberculosis exhibit, or by 
women's clubs, churches or other organizations, and have there 
described the work that the medical profession in the State and 
the State itself is doing and expects to do. They have urged 
cities, towns and villages to co-operate with the State work, and 
have described how this can best be done. In particular, they 
have urged cities and towns throughout the State to form tuber- 
culosis associations, dispensaries, clinics and day camps, and 
have furnished information as to the best and most practical 
way of doing this. Thus, when the three hospitals being built 
by this commission are completed and in readiness to receive 
patients, there will be throughout the State organizations ready 
to send to these institutions patients who need treatment. In 
this way these hospitals will reach their greatest usefulness in 
the shortest possible time. 

During the past year tuberculosis associations or committees 
have been formed in the following places: Andover, Brockton, 
Brookline, Chelsea, Clinton, Everett, Fall River, Fitchburg, 
Gloucester, Haverhill, Holyoke, Lawrence, Lynn, Maiden, New- 
ton, Northampton, Pittsfield, Quincy, Salem, Walpole, Wal- 
tham. 

Day camps have been established in Brookline, Cambridge, 
Clinton, Holyoke, Lawrence, Salem, Springfield and Woburn. 
Clinics for tuberculosis or tuberculosis classes have been 



10 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



formed in Haverhill, Holjoke, Lawrence, Maiden, Northamp- 
ton, Salem and Springfield. 

The greater part of this work is dne to the efforts of the 
Associated Committees of the Massachusetts Medical Society. 
This Board, however, is in the closest touch with these com- 
mittees and with the work being done by the medical profession 
in the State. 

In the spring of this year there was passed House Bill No. 
257 : " An Act relative to Instruction in the Public Schools as 
to Tuberculosis and its Prevention." The State Board of 
Education appointed a committee of physicians to draw up a 
pamphlet on the subject, to be used by teachers in the public 
schools. The chairman and secretary of this commission were 
made respectively the chairman and secretary of the committee 
appointed to do this, and the work of drawing up and writing 
this pamphlet was done in the offices of this commission. 

In September of this year the International Congress on 
Tuberculosis was held in Washington. The Massachusetts 
Legislature appropriated the sum of $3,800 to be spent for 
representing this State in this Congress. This money was to be 
used by the Massachusetts State Committee on the International 
Congress, under the direction of the State Board of Health. 
This Massachusetts Committee consisted of approximately one 
hundred physicians and laymen throughout the State. The 
chairman and secretary of this Board were chosen to fill similar 
positions on this State Committee. The work to be done con- 
sisted, first, in preparing a suitable State exhibit ; second, as an 
important part of the exhibit, the writing and publishing of a 
memoir, a large volume, which in several chapters covered the 
history, development and present status of the tuberculosis 
question in Massachusetts; third, in arousing interest in the 
Congress among the medical profession and the public in this 
State. The committee began its work in January, 1908. With 
the exception of the memoir, the greater part of the work was 
done in the offices of this commission; and the fact that this 
commission is in close touch with the tuberculosis organizations 
in the State has made it possible for Massachusetts to be credit- 
ably represented at this Congress in Washington. 



1908.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 77. 



11 



Thus the offices of this commission have been a central point, 
where various anti-tuberculosis agencies of the State have car- 
ried on their activities. The Board has co-operated and has 
been in close touch with other boards, — the State Board of 
Health, the State Board of Education, the medical profession 
of the State, the International Congress on Tuberculosis, etc. 
Tuberculosis hospitals, sanatoria, private and public associa- 
tions, dispensaries and classes send us their reports and infor- 
mation as to all they are doing. It is to be expected that this 
part of the commission's work will grow in importance and use- 
fulness each year. 

In view of the fact that the commission has had from the start 
so manv activities besides those directly concerning the three 
hospitals, it seems proper that the expenses of their office and 
the salaries of their office force should not be taken out of the 
appropriation of $300,000 voted for building the hospitals. 

We would ask that an appropriation be made to cover the 
above expenses of the office; and, as one if not two of the hos- 
pitals are expected to be ready for occupancy before the next 
Legislature meets, we would ask that funds for the mainte- 
nance of this commission and of these hospitals be appropriated 
in accordance with the following schedules : — 

Estimate for Maintenance of Office of Commission on Hospitals for 



Consumptives. 

Salary of secretary, $1,500 00 

Salarj'' of stenographer and clerk, 950 00 

Rent of offices, 800 00 

Running- expenses, including: — 

Postage, $100 00 

Printing report and educational leaflets for 

distribution, 500 00 

Miscellaneous expenses, 1,000 00 

1,600 00 



$4,850 00 



12 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Estimate for Maintenance of Sanatorium at Xorth Reading. 





Twelve Months. 


One Month. 


kTuiCll iv^^ ....... 


S26,620 00 


S2.218 .3.33 


Food ....... 


30,578 00 


2,548 166 


Farm, stable, etc., . 


2,100 00 


175 000 


Heat, light and power, .... 


6,400 00 


533 333 


Furnishings, ...... 


1,800 00 


150 000 


Miscellaneous, ...... 


9,500 00 


791 666 




S76,99S 00 


S6,416 498 



Per capita per week, $9.87+ 



Special appropriations : — 

Hoi-ses, teams, harnesses, etc., . . . , . . $3,200 00 

For repaii-s and additions to stable, 4,000 00 

Tools and farming implements, 300 00 

Grading and improvements, 2,200 00 

Spur track and freight shed, 1,000 00 



, $10,700 00 

Estimate for Maintenance of Sanatorium at Lakeville. 



Twelve Months. One Month. 



Salaries, wages and labor, 


S2S.4S0 00 


82.373 33i 


Food, 1.50 patients at 84 per week, 


31.200 00 


2,600 00 


Farm, stable and grounds. 


2,160 00 


ISO 00 


Heat, Ught and power, .... 


7,000 00 


583 33i 


Furnishings, breakage and repair. 


1,800 00 


150 00 


Miscellaneous, ...... 


• 9,000 00 


750 00 




S79.640 00 


86,636 661 



Per capita per week, $10.21 -r 



1908.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT— Xo. 77. 13 

Special appropriations : — 

Horses, vehicles, harnesses, etc., $3,250 00 

Tools and farming implements, 300 00 

Grading and improvements, 2,200 00 

Draining pond, 700 00 

Barn, 6,000 00 



$12,450 00 

Respectfully submitted, 



AETHUE T. CABOT. 
CHAELES H. ADAMS. 
ALVAH CROCKEE. 
ALBEET C. GETCHELL. 
WILLIAM C. GODFEEY. 
SYLVIA B. KXOWLTOX. 
WILLIAM D. McEEE. 
CHAELES H. POETEE. 
JEEEMIAH SMITH, Jb. 



14 HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 1908. 



APPE^ DIX. 



The following figures represent preliminary estimates of the 
cost of construction of the hospitals at Xorth Reading and at 
Lakeville, as presented to the Governor and the Council and 
approved by them : — 

Estimate of Cost of Construction of Sanatorium at Xorth Beading. 



Land $5,000 00 

Expenses of commission, siir^-eys. etc 3.000 00 

Water, 5,000 00 

Buildings, including plumbing, 5S.677 00 

Laundry, 1.558 00 

Sewer, 2,000 00 

Generator, 1,730 00 

Electric wiring, 1,635 00 

Heating of buildings, boilers, smoke stack, water heaters, 

etc., 12.375 00 



$90,975 00 

Architect and furnishing, 9,025 00 



$100,000 00 

Estimate of Cost of Construction of Sanatorium at Lakeville. 

Land, $1,125 00 

Expenses of commission, surveys, etc., .... 2,323 01 

Water, 3.250 00 

Buildings, including pliunbing, 61.700 00 

Laimdry 1,500 00 

Sewer, 1,800 00 

Generator and engine, 1,680 00 

Electric wiring 1.400 00 

Heating of buildings, boilei-s, smoke stack, water heaters, 

etc., 9,000 00 



$89,778 01 

Architect and furnishing, 10.221 99 



$100,000 00 



Public Document 



No. 77 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Massachusetts Commission on Hospitals 
FOR Consumptives. 



November 30, 1909. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1910. 



Approved by 
The State Boaed of Publication. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Commissioners, 5 

Report of the Commissioners, 7 

Report of Superintendent of North Reading Sanatorium, 16 

Report of Superintendent of Lakeyille Sanatorium, . . 25 

Report of Superintendent of Westfield Sanatorium, . . 29 

Appendix A, 37 

Appendix B, 40 

Appendix C, 43 



COMMISSIONERS. 



Arthur T. Cabot, M.D., Chairman. 
Charles H. Adams. William C. Godfrey. 

Alvah Crocker. Sylvia B. Knowlton. 

Arthur Drinkavater. William D. McFee, M.D. 

Albert C. Getchell, M.D. Charles H. Porter. 



John B. Hawes, 2d, M.D., Secretary. 



3 Joy Street, Boston. 



Commontocaltl) of illaesacliuectts. 



EEPORT OF THE MASSACHUSETTS COMMISSION ON HOS- 
PITALS FOR CONSUMPTIYES. 



To His Excellency the Oovernor of the Commonivealth and to the Honorable 

Council. 

In accordance Avith the terms of the act establishing this com- 
mission (chapter 474 of the Acts of 1907), the Board submits 
the following report as to the progress of its work : — 

In June, 1909, the term of office of Mr. Jeremiah Smith, 
Jr., a member of this commission, expired. As he was unable 
to continue a member of the Board, Mr. Arthur Drinkwater 
was appointed by Governor Draper to fill his place. 

The accommodations for patients and for the employees nec- 
essary for the care of them are being erected and made ready 
for occupancy without exceeding the appropriation of $315,000. 
Much still remains to be done, however, to make these sana- 
toria attractive, thoroughly efficient and economical of admin- 
istration. 

It is manifestly important to have the grounds about the 
buildings attractive, for an important element in promoting 
the cure of these patients is to keep them cheerful and inter- 
ested in the outdoor life. 

Since the North Reading Sanatorium has been in operation 
we have found that the patients coming to us expect to sleep 
and live in the open air. Some of those with advanced dis- 
ease, in the warm wards, have asked to be aioved into the open 
pavilions. This shows how far the education of the people in 
regard to the paramount importance of open air has progressed. 
Light occupation and even work must be supplied to our more 
vigorous patients in order to keep them in the best condition 



8 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



possible. Under the watch of the physicians this can be given 
to the women by letting them do light work in the wards or 
in the garden and poultry ysLvd. For the men, the light work 
in the wards, the care of the grounds, light work on the farm, 
care of stock and driving will furnish outdoor occupations. 

Before the next Legislature meets, this commission, under 
the provisions of section 15, chapter 474 of the Acts of 1907, 
will assume control as trustees of the Massachusetts State Sana- 
toriuhi at Rutland, as well as of the three sanatoria now under 
their charge. This is therefore a fitting time for them to state, 
as far as they can, their policy as to the admission and apportion- 
ment of patients. A statement at this time is called for also by 
the fact that the fear has been publicly expressed that discrimi- 
nation will be shown against cities already having sanatoria for 
the treatment of consumptives. The intention to admit patients 
in every stage of the disease has also been adversely commented 
upon, on the ground that incipient cases should not be treated 
in institutions where advanced cases are received. 

AVe would state, therefore, that there will be no discrimina- 
tion against an}^ city or town in the State. It is the intention 
of the commission to admit to the State sanatoria all consump- 
tive patients who are residents in the State and who make 
proper application. After these patients are under our obser- 
vation it will be possible to discriminate among them and 
select the really incipient cases for transfer to the Rutland 
Sanatorium. Occasions will doubtless arise when incipient or 
early cases cannot be thus transferred. Some patients who are 
willino: to enter a sanatorium in their immediate neio:hborhood 
may not be willing to go to Rutland ; others may be debarred 
from entering Rutland because of noncitizenship ; at times the 
Rutland Sanatorium may be full. When for any of these 
reasons we are obliged to keep incipient cases at one of the 
sanatoria where advanced cases are also taken, we feel that we 
offer them opportunities for recovery vastly better than they 
would have at home. Our arrangements are such that the early 
cases do not come in close contact with the advanced cases, 
and to patients living in the open air day and night the danger 
of contagion is practically nothing. 

As was pointed out in the last report this commission was 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



9 



empowered to establish dispensaries and to disseminate knowl- 
edge about tuberculosis. No appropriation was made, how- 
ever, for the support of dispensaries nor for the dissemination 
of knowledge. Approaching this part of its duties the com- 
mission felt that for the present at least its efforts should be 
directed toward encouraging cities, towns and anti-tuberculosis 
associations to establish dispensaries, day camps and tubercu- 
losis classes. Much has been done in this direction. At the 
office of the commission data in regard to this sort of work have 
been collected, and information and advice have^ been put at 
the disposal of organizations undertaking these enterprises. 

A systematic plan for procuring the publication of appropri- 
ate articles on anti-tuberculosis work in various daily and weekly 
newspapers throughout the State has been successfully carried 
out. Bulletins prepared by the National Tuberculosis Asso- 
ciation upon various phases of the tuberculosis problem have 
been sent twice a month to 150 newspapers and journals through- 
out the State, where they have been given wide publication. 
In this way the people have been kept informed and a public 
interest has been aroused, which has done much to stimulate 
local work in various parts of the Commonwealth. 

The three superintendents of our hospitals and the secretary 
of the Board have spoken at many public meetings on tuber- 
culosis. The commission's offices in the Twentieth Century 
Club building, 3 Joy Street, are becoming more and more a 
center for information on all that pertains to the tuberculosis 
problem in this State. Letters and personal visits from all 
over the country have been frequent. A collection of pam- 
phlets, reprints, bulletins, reports on tuberculosis, is kept at 
the office, and a wide distribution of these is made. Some 400 
letters, containing such material and answers to inquiries of 
various kinds, have been sent out during the past year. The 
commission has been provided by private donation with a set 
of lantern slides and material for lectures on tuberculosis, which 
have been largely used. 

As in the past this commission has been in close touch with 
the Associated Committees of the Massachusetts Medical Society 
for the Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis, and acting with 
these it has been influential in sendino^ the travelino' tubercu- 



10 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



losis exhibit to various cities and towns throughout the 
State. 

Durinir the past year tuberculosis associations or committees 
have been formed in Adams, Framingham, Gardner, Great Bar- 
rington, Hudson, Xewburyport, Pittsfield, Quincy and Somer- 
ville ; day camps have been established at Braintree, Cambridge, 
Clinton, Springfield and Worcester ; clinics for tuberculosis 
or tuberculosis classes or dispensaries have been formed at Fall 
River, Fitchburg, Holyoke, Maiden, Medford and New Bed- 
ford; district nurses have been employed in Adams, Canton, 
Fall River, Great Barrington and Lowell. 

Thus the offices of this commission have been a central point 
where various anti-tuberculosis agencies of the State have car- 
ried on their activities. The Board has co-operated and has 
been in close touch with other Boards, — the State Board of 
Health, the State Board of Education, the medical profession 
of the State, etc. Tuberculosis hospitals, sanatoria, private 
and public associations, dispensaries and classes send us their 
reports and information as to all they are doing. It is to be 
expected that this part of the commission's work will grow in 
importance and usefulness each year. 

It is of the first importance that this work of educating the 
people should go on without diminution, and that this commis- 
sion should keep itself informed as to the various local organi- 
zations interested in anti-tuberculosis work so that it may help 
to bring about the fullest co-operation among them. 

After the three hospitals in our charge are completed and 
we have the management of the four State sanatoria, the busi- 
ness of this office will be still further increased. We ask, 
therefore, for authority to engage offices and such office force 
as is necessary, and we recommend the passage of the follow- 
ing act : — 

Ax Act to provide for ax Office axd to determine a Name for 
THE Board for ESTABLismxG Three Saxatoria for Tubercular 
Patiexts. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: — 

Section 1. The board for establishing three sanatoria for tubercular 
patients, which board was created by chapter four hundred and seventy- 
four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and seven, shall hereafter 
be known as the Commission on Hospitals for Consumptives. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



11 



Section 2. The said commission shall have power to establish an office 
in the state house, or elsewhere in the city of Boston, and employ clerical 
assistance. 

Section 3. For the purposes mentioned in the preceding section and 
for defraying traveling and general exjDenses of the commission, and the 
expense of carrying out the powers conferred by section nine of said chaj)- 
ter four hundred and seventy-four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred 
and seven of establishing out-patient departments and disseminating infor- 
mation as to the best method of combating tuberculosis, suitable appro 
priation shall be made annually. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 



Disbursements have been as follows : — 



ToXov. 30, 1907 (office), .... 






$1,093 66 


To Xov. 30, 1908 (office), .... 






3,759 85 


North Reading State Sanatorium, to Xov, 30, 1908, 




8,880 30 


Lakeville State Sanatorium, to Xov. 30, 1908, 






4,505 63 


Westfield State Sanatorium, to Xov. 30, 1908, 






6,240 38 


To Xov. 30, 1909 (office) : — 








Salary of secretary, .... 


$1,500 00 




Salary of stenographer. 


958 


33 




Rent of offices, ..... 


866 


58 




Stationery, office supplies, i3rinting,etc., 


337 


12 




Telephone, ...... 


98 


92 




Press clipping service. 


60 


00 




Traveling expenses of members of 








commission, ..... 


139 


13 




Xorth Reading State Sanatorium, 


76,961 


23 




Lakeville State Sanatorium, 


63,209 


98 




Westfield State Sanatorium, 


51,581 


02 










195,712 31 








$220,192 13 


Appropriation, ...... 






$315,000 00 


Disbursements, ...... 






220,192 13 








$94,807 87 



North Reading State Sanatorium. 
The construction of this sanatorium has been rapidly pushed 
forward during the past year. Under the able management of 
Dr. Ernest B. Emerson, the superintendent, a considerable 
part of the outside work of installing the water and sewerage 
systems and the heating and power plants has been done by 
day labor, and substantial saving of expense has thus been 



12 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



effected. A more detailed account of this work will be found 
in Dr. Emerson's report. 

At the monthly meeting of the commission, on Sept. 21, 
1900, it was voted to inform the Governor of the Common- 
wealth that the North Reading State Sanatorium was ready to 
receive patients, and to request him to open the hospital. 
This vote was transmitted to His Excellency Governor Draper, 
and on Sept. 22, 1909, he issued the following proclamation : — 

The Board appointed by authority of section 1 of chapter 474 of the 
Acts of the year 1907, to establish three sanatoriums for tnbercuh\r patients, 
having notified me, under the provisions of section 7 of said chapter, as 
amended by section 2 of chapter 532 of the Acts of 1908, that one of the 
buildings constructed under the provisions of said chapter 474 of the Acts 
of 1907, being that constructed in the town of North Reading, is so far 
completed that in the opinion of said Board it may properly be used for 
the purposes set forth in said act, — I, therefore, in accordance with said 
acts proclaim this sanatorium to be now established and ready for the 
reception of inmates, as provided by law. 

(Signed) Eben S. Draper, 

Governor of Massachusetts. 

Boston, Sept. 22, 1909. 

Dr. Emerson at once proceeded to assemble his staff of 
assistant physicians, nurses and other employees. Without 
delay notices were sent to the patients on the waiting list, and 
on October 1 they began to arrive at the sanatorium. There 
are now (Xovember 30) under treatment at this sanatorium 
116 patients, of whom 60 are men and 56 are women. 

The sanatorium comprises a large administration and domes- 
tic building, containing rooms for the superintendent, assist- 
ants, nurses, etc., kitchens and dining rooms; two closed 
wards for patients in advanced stages of the disease and four 
open pavilions for ambulatory cases. The wards and pavilions 
face south and are sheltered on the north by a growth of pine 
trees. The pavilions are so constructed that the sleeping 
wings can be closed in and heated at small expense in case the 
proportion of bed cases requiring warm wards is greater than 
has been anticipated. The buildings are of wood, lighted by 
electricity, heated by steam and supplied with water from 
driven wells. The nearest railroad station is North Wilmino- 
ton, two miles away, while electrics from Andover and Lowell 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 13 

to the north, and Reading and Boston to the south, pass within 
ten minutes* walk of the sanatorium. 

This sanatorium has been completed in the manner above 
described without exceeding the $105,000 provided bj chapter 
474, Acts of 1907, and chapter 414, Acts of 1909 (Appendix 
A). The construction is simple but substantial. 

In order to accomplish this it has been necessary' to exercise 
the most rigid economy. The amount left for furnishing was 
only sufficient to supply bed clothing for the time of year when 
the sanatorium was opened. As the weather became more 
severe it has been necessary to procure additional blankets. 
The other furnishings also were limited to what was indispensa- 
ble, and considerable additions must be made for the comfort of 
the patients and for efficiency and economy of administration. 

In the charges against each sanatorium is one amounting to 
$2,937.8ii for the expenses of the commission. Of this charge 
rather more than two-thirds has been spent in " disseminating 
information as to the best methods of combating the disease 
and in bringing about the establishment of dispensaries. In 
short, these expenses were incurred in carrying out the general 
State campaign against tuberculosis. 

To fairly arrive at the actual expenses of building and fitting 
out these sanatoria such general expenses of the commission 
should be deducted. 

For purposes of comparison the building expenses of some 
recent sanatoria are of interest : — 







Nomber of 






PtKtieiits. 


Rhode Island State Sanatoriam, Wallum Lake, .... 


$217,000 CO 


liO 




1G0,S00 00 


100 




233,000 00 


801 



Lakeville State .'*^axatorium. 
This institution is rapidly nearing completion. The site is 
a convenient one, just outside of Middleborough, within 
easy reach of Taunton, New Bedford. Fall River, Brockton, 
Attleborough, etc. There are three large buildings, — the 



1 A day camp is also maintained for a certain number of pattents. 



14 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



administration building, containing offices, rooms for the 
superintendent, assistants and nurses, dining rooms, etc., and 
two large ward buildings, one for men and one for women. 
These ward buildings each contain two closed wards for very 
sick patients and two open wards or pavilions for patients in 
the earlier stages of the disease. The hospital will probably 
be ready to receive patients in December of this year. 

Westfield State Sanatorium. 

The AVestfield State Sanatorium will probably be completed 
early in the spring. The plans call for a group of six build- 
ings, — an administration building, with rooms for the super- 
intendent and assistants ; service building, with dining rooms 
and kitchens, servants* quarters, etc. ; two ward buildings for 
advanced cases and two pavilions for incipient cases. In addi- 
tion there is already on the property a large four-story barn. 

The sanatorium is situated two miles from the center of 
AVestfield and seven miles west from Springfield. An electric 
car line runs between the two places and passes the sanatorium 
property within six minutes' walk of the buildings. Trains 
on the Boston & Albany railroad arrive at Westfield from the 
west at 10 : 36 a.m. and 5 : 20 p.m. ; from the east at 11 : 41 
A.M. and 4:31 p.m. Patients comins^ on one of these trains 
will be met at the station. The post-office address of patients 
will be Westfield, Mass., care of the Westfield State Sanatorium. 

The search for water at Westfield was a troublesome one. 
After boring in all the more promising parts of the property 
in vain, a supply was found in the extreme eastern corner, near 
a brook coming down from the hills behind. The supply of 
water here seems to be sufficient, but the State Board of Health, 
while finding the water suitable at the present time for drink- 
ing, questions the desirability of these wells as sources from 
which to take water for the permanent supply of the institu- 
tion, and says that if used temporarily the water should be 
analyzed at frequent intervals in order that its use may be dis- 
continued if deterioration occurs. 

The property has been so thoroughly examined for water 
that we feel that this is our only chance of obtaining a suf- 
ficient supply on our own land. The alternative would be to 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 15 



take water from the Springfield water supply. This main 
passes the property at about a mile and a quarter distance. 
Laying a pipe from their main to the property would cost some- 
where between $5,000 and $7,000. 

AVe are making a further examination of this question and 
will report further as soon as we have reached a conclusion. 
This may require a request for an additional appropriation for 
this work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR T. CABOT. 
CHARLES H. ADAMS. 
ALVAH CROCKER. 
ARTHUR DRINKWATER. 
ALBERT C. GETCHELL. 
WILLL\M C. CiODFREY. 
SYLVIA B. KXOWLTOX. 
WILLIAM D. McFEE. 
CHARLES H. PORTER. 



16 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



EEPORT OF THE NORTH READING STATE SANATORIUM. 



Dr. Ernest B. Emerson, Super intende^it. 



North Reading, Mass. 
To the Commission on Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Gentlemen: — Ground was broken for the construction of 
the sanatorium at North Reading Oct. 28, 1908, and by proc- 
lamation of His Excellency Governor Draper it was opened for 
patients Sept. 22, 1909. 

There have been admitted since the opening of the sanato- 
rium 5 incipient cases, 80 moderately advanced and 64 far- 
advanced cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. The first patient 
was admitted Oct. 1, 1909. Most of our patients have shown 
a cheerful and willing spirit to co-operate with us in their 
treatment. Considerable doubt has been felt that the sanato- 
rium, constructed as it is, with over half of the beds in open 
sleeping pavilions, would meet the requirements of a sanato- 
rium for advanced cases. Thus far the majority of our patients, 
although suffering from a moderately advanced type of the 
disease, are desirous of sleeping in the open pavilions, and 
can be cared for in these buildings •without much additional 
work. Many of the far-advanced cases are kept in the wards 
only under protest. Although the winter is before us, and 
the cases advanced, I feel that the outlook for treating them in 
the buildino:s which we have is most encoura^jino:. 

Water Supply. 
Considerable difficulty was experienced in locating a suitable 
water supply. Numerous test wells were driven on various 
parts of the farm before a sufficient supply was found. On 
driving test wells, either a very fine sand which would not 
allow a flow of water, or ledge was encountered. Late in the 
spring an area of moderately coarse sand and gravel was lo- 
cated south of the group of buildings, from Avhich we are now 
drawing a good supply of water. A pump of sufficient size 
for our present needs, driven b}^ an electric motor, has been 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMEXT 



— Xo. 77. 



17 



installed. A tank with a capacity of 20,000 gallons stands a 
few rods to the west of the sanatorium, and hydrants have been 
placed at suitable intervals. There is a sufficient pressure from 
the tank to afford protection to our highest roof. 

Sewer. 

The sewage system was started early in the spring, and was 
done by men hired by the day, considenibly below the esti- 
mated cost. The system consists of a main line starting oppo- 
site the ward building on the west and running in an easterly 
direction into a series of cesspools, located some 300 yards 
east of the buildings. 

Conduit. 

The conduit carrying steam and hot-water pipes to the sev- 
eral buildings, constructed of matched tile laid in cement, was 
put in by men hired by the day. 

Ix General. 

Many delays have been encountered throughout the year, 
chief of which was that connected with the installation of the 
water system, which delayed the opening of the sanatorium 
fully six weeks. A driveway has been started leading to the 
main street, and considerable grading has been done. How- 
ever, this work makes as yet but small showing. Much of the 
work about the grounds, I believe, should be done at odd 
times by our own force of regular employees, when they would 
otherwise be idle or laid off duty. 

APPOIXT5tENTS. 

Dr. Carl C. McCorison, formerly assistant physician at the 
State Infirmary, has been appointed assistant superintendent. 
Miss Jane Barker, a graduate of the Children's Hospital, Bos- 
ton, formerly in charge of the Cambridge Hospital day camp, 
has been appointed superintendent of nurses and matron. Mr. 
Edward W. Perry, formerly of the Reading municipal light 
plant, has been appointed chief engineer. 

Recommendations. 
The barn, which is somewhat out of repaii', is well worth 
making over, with certain additions which are necessary to 



18 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



properly care for our teams, and allow us to purchase and 
store hay, grain and other supplies in much larger quantities. 
I would recommend that $8,000 be appropriated for this pur- 
pose. I would recommend that an appropriation of $1,800 be 
made for the building and equipping of a piggery, and a like 
amount for the building and equipping of a hennery. As our 
buildings are considerably separated from each other I would 
recommend that an appropriation of $500 be made for the 
building of concrete walks. An appropriation of $2,000 should 
be made for an additional engine and generator of somewhat 
larger size than the one now in use, as without doubt within a 
few years our growth will demand such an outfit, and in the 
mean time I believe we should be protected against any pos- 
sible breakdown. At present we are disinfecting the bedding 
and clothinor with chemicals. Althouofh this method is effec- 
tive, it is expensive and not as satisfactory as a properly con- 
structed steam sterilizer. Nine hundred dollars should be 
appropriated for the purchase and installation of such apparatus. 
Five hundred dollars should be appropriated for the building 
of an incinerator, as at present all sputum and other refuse is 
beino^ burned under the boilers. Additional furnishino:s and 
equipment are needed for the comfort of our patients and for 
the proper and economical management of the institution. A 
laboratory, the importance of which cannot be overestimated, 
should be furnished with the necessary apparatus for carrying 
on the scientific and research work demanded of every institu- 
tion of similar character. I would recommend that $2,500 be 
appropriated for the above items. We are now paying for 
the use of a spur track a mile and a half distant and teaming 
our supplies at a considerable expense. A sum of $1,000 is 
needed for the purchase of a narrow strip of land and the 
building of a side track thereon. An appropriation of $80,620 
will be necessary for the maintenance of the sanatorium for the 
ensuing year (see Appendix A). 

Respectfully siibmitted, 

ERNEST B. EMERSON, 

Superintendent. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



19 



TREASUEEK'S REPORT. 



To the Commission on Hospitals for Consumptives. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1909 : — 

Cash Account. 
Heceipts. 

Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates : — 

Private, $993 70 

Cities and towns, 103 71 

$1,097 41 

Salaries, wages and labor : — 

Wages not called for 20 79 

$1,118 20 

Receipts from Treasury of Commomoealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Advance money ($3,500, less returned, $1,308.24), . . . $2,19176 

Approved schedules of 1909 13,654 81 

15,846 57 

Total $16,964 77 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, . . . $1,118 20 

Maintenance appropriations : — 

Two months' schedules, 1909 13,654 81 

November advances 2,191 76 

Total $16,964 77 



Maintenance. 

Appropriation, $20,000 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below), 19,996 82 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, $3 18 



Analysis of Expenses. 



Salaries, wages and labor : — 

General administration, $1,512 69 

Medical service 639 74 

Ward service (male) , 234 99 

Ward service (female), ...... 480 69 

Repairs and improvements, .... 82 92 

Farm, stable and grounds 951 54 

$3,902 57 

Food : — 

Butter $329 23 

Beans 45 30 

Bread and crackers, 11 00 



A7nounts carried forward. 



$385 53 



$4,288 10 



20 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward. 

Food — Concluded. 

Cereals, rice, nienl, etc.. 



Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, 

Fruit (dried and fresh), 

Meats 

Milk 

Molasses and syrup. 

Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa. 

Vegetables 

Sundries, .... 



Clothing and materials : — 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 



Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . 
Brushes, brooms, .... 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc.. 
Furniture and upholstery, . 
Kitchen furnishings, . 
Wodden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 
Sundries, 



Heat, light and power : - 
Coal, 

Oil 

Sundries, 



Eepairs and improvements : — 
Cement, lime and plaster, . 
Electrical work and supplies. 

Hardware 

Lumber, .... 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., . 
Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies. 



Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Harnesses and repairs. 
Tools, farm machines, etc.. 
Sundries, 



Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., 

Freight, expressage and transportation. 

Ice 

Medicines and hospital supplies. 

Postage, 

Printing and printing supplies, • 
Soap and laundry supplies, . 
Stationery and office supplies, . 
Travel and expenses (officials), . 
Telephone and telegraph, . 
Cuspidor supplies, .... 
Sundries, 



$38.5 53 

65 50 

24 84 
280 f>b 
1,347 02 

65 60 
]60 69 
958 94 
475 18 

14 .55 
317 99 
104 38 
3-21 68 
267 17 



$4,288 10 



$14 89 



$2,337 73 

113 76 
106 06 
174 25 

114 03 
182 81 

51 13 



$2,327 94 

38 65 

9 60 



$1 50 
19 31 
57 85 
74 00 
42 49 
223 95 



$221 29 
1,012 58 
6 50 
47 14 
400 98 



$132 26 
559 25 
125 00 
1,259 84 
28 89 
199 30 
310 31 
282 65 
38 58 
22 16 
508 00 
302 22 



4.7^ 



22 62 



3,079 77 



2,376 19 



419 10 



1,688 49 



3,718 46 



Total expenses for maintenance. 



$19,996 82 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 



21 



Resources axd Liabilities. 
Jtetources. 

NoTcmber cash Touchere (paid from advance money), . . . $2,191 76 
Due from treasnry of Commonwealth account November, 1909, 

schedule. 4,150 5; 

$€,S43 01 

LiabaUies. 

Schedule of November bills, $6342 01 

ERXEST B. EMERSOX, 

Treasurer. 

Examined and found correct as compared with the records in the office of the 
Auditor of the Commonwealth. 



WARREX A. MERRILL, 

Assistant Supervisor of Accounts. 



22 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 

STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Admissions and Discharges, 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients admitted Sept. 22 to Nov. 30, 1909, 


83 


66 


149 


Number discharged Sept. 22 to Nov. 30, 1909, inclusive, 


23 


10 


33 


Number of deaths (included in preceding items). 


4 


2 


6 


Number remaining in sanatorium Nov. 30, 1909, . 


60 


56 


116 


Daily average number of patients, 


58 


44 


102 



From where admitted. 



Place. 


Num- 
ber. 


Place. 


Num- 
ber. 


Place. 


Num- 
ber. 


.^UJcoUUXj, • • • 




TTvHp Park 




"R p o H 1 n o* 


o 

o 


Andover, . 


2 


Ipswich, . 


1 


Revere, 


2 


Arlington, . 


4 


Lawrence, 


5 


Salem, 


2 


Attleborough, . 


2 


Leominster, 


1 


Sharon, 


1 


Boston, 


13 


Lowell, 


2 


Somerville, 


3 


Brockton, . 


11 


Lynn, 


4 


South Sudbury, 




Brookline, . 


2 


Maiden, 


2 


South Weymouth, . 




Cambridge, 


3 


Mansfield, . 


1 


Springfield, 




Campello, . 


1 


Marstons Mills, 


1 


Stoneham, 




Canton, 


2 


Maynard, . 


1 


Taunton, . 




Chelmsford, 


1 


Med ford, . 


.1 


Tewksbury, 




Chelsea, 


3 


Melrose, . 


3 


Upton, 




Dedham, 


1 


Middleborough, 


1 


Wakefield, 




East Watertown, 


1 


Newburyport, . 


1 


Warren, . 




Everett, 


3 


North Attleborough, 


2 


Waverley, 




Fitchburg, . 


6 


North bridge, 


1 


Wellesley, 




Gloucester, . 


1 


Northampton, . 


1 


Westport, . 




Great Barrington, 


1 


North Weymouth, . 


1 


Whitman, . 




Haverhill, . 


1 


Pittsfield, . 


1 


Winthrop, 




Hebron ville, 


1 


Plymouth, 


1 


Woburn, . 


2 


Hollislon, . 


1 


Pride's Crossing, 


1 


Worcester, 


9 


Holyoke, 


6 


Quincy, 


2 


Total, . 


149 


Hopedale, . 


1 











1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 23 



Age of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




1 


2 


3 




6 


6 


12 




30 


23 


53 




27 


20 


47 




14 


9 


23 




5 


6 


11 




83 


66 


149 



Civil Condition of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




35 


31 


66 




45 


31 


76 




3 


4 


7 












83 


66 


149 



Occupations. 





Males. 


Females. 




Males. 


Females. 


Artist, .... 


1 




Metal polisher, 


1 




Barber, .... 


2 




Mill operative, 


5 


5 


Boiler maker, . 


2 




Milliner, 




1 


Bookkeeper, . 




1 


Minister, 


1 




Bottler, .... 


1 




Newspaper reporter, . 


1 




Brakeman, 


1 




No work, 


1 




Cap maker. 




1 


Nurse, .... 




1 


Carpenter, 


2 




Nurse (trained), . 




1 


Clerk 


6 




Nuisemaid, . 




1 


Coil winder, . 




1 


Painter, 


3 




Comb maker, . 


1 




Pedler 


1 




Domestic, 




8 


Printer, 


1 




Dressmaker, . 




1 


Roofer, .... 


1 




Electrician, 


2 




Salesman, 


3 




Engineer, 


1 




Shipping clerk. 


2 




Fibb cutter. 


1 




Shoe factory operative. 


3 


4 


Gardener, 


2 




Shoemaker, . 


6 




Housewife, 




34 


Stenographer, 


1 




Iceman, .... 


1 




Student, 


4 


5 


Jeweler 


3 




Tailor, .... 


1 




Journalist, 


1 




Teacher, 


1 


2 


Laborer, .... 


12 




Teamster, 


1 




Machinist, 


5 




Tinsmith, 


1 




Mattress maker. 


1 




Totals, 


83 


66 



24 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 

Nativity and Parentage of Patients. 



Males. 



Females. 



PLACES OF NATIVITY. 



United States : — 
Massachusetts, 
Other New England States, 
Other States, . 
Total native, . 



32 



43 



10 



20 



32 



Other countries : — 
Canada, . 
England, . 
Finland, . 
Germany, 
Greece, . 
Ireland, . 
Italy, 
Norway, . 
Portugal, 
Russia, 
Scotland, . 
Sweden, . 
Turkey, . 
Western Islands, . 

Total foreign, . 
Unknown, 

Totals, 



11 



20 



34 



83 



66 



73 
1 

149 



Deaths, Duration of Disease, Length of Stay in Sanatorium and Cause of 

Death. 



Sex. 


Duration. 


Stay. 


Cause of Death. 


Male, . 




About 2^ years. 


1 month 8 days, 


Phthisis. 


Male, . 




About 1 year, . 


27 days. 


Phthisis. 


Male, . 




About 2^ years. 


21 days. 


Phthisis. 


Male, . 




About 2| years. 


9 days, 


Phthisis. 


Female, . 




About 1| years, 


1 month 18 days. 


Phthisis. 


Female, . 




About 3 years, . 


1 month 3 days. 


Phthisis. 





1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



25 



EEPORT OF THE LAKEYILLE STATE SANATORIUM. 



Dr. Sumner Coolidge, Superintendent. 



Lakevillk, Mass. 

To the Commission on Hospitals for Conszimptives. 

Gentlemen: — Since building operations were begun, in 
February, the work has progressed consistently for the most 
part, the failure to complete the buildings on schedule time 
being due to frequent delinquencies of subcontractors and 
delays in the receipt of material. It is hoped that the build- 
ings will be ready for occupancy about December 15. 

Since June 1 the superintendent has lived at the sanatorium 
and has had personal supervision of the entire work. A small 
force of men and three horses have been kept busy during that 
time on work which it was thought could be done most eco- 
nomically by the day. In this way the steam conduit, electric 
duct, cesspools and drains have been completed, as well as the 
digging for the water system, the rough grading, the begin- 
ning of a macadamized avenue, the entire supply of sand and 
gravel for plastering and granolithic floors, and, since Novem- 
ber 1, the carting of material from the cars to the buildings. 
For all work done for contractors allowance is made equivalent 
to the ruling price for such labor in this vicinity, so that by 
timely co-operation with the contract work a substantial sav- 
ing to the Commonwealth in time and money has been accom- 
plished. 

The site selected for this institution possesses to a consider- 
able degree many of the requirements for an ideal tuberculosis 
sanatorium. The elevation, soil, southerly exposure and ac- 
cessibility are exceptional for this part of the State, and there 
is a fair stand of young forest trees, but there our available 
natural assets end. The property has not been productive for 
many years. Although it contains very good land for vege- 
table farming, it is still in the rough and can be brought into 
cultivation but slowly. 



26 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



The buildings are arranged to care for 48 patients in shacks^ 
50 in wards slightly warmed, 40 in warm wards and 12 in 
small rooms, and it is hoped that each patient assigned to this 
sanatorium may be placed in the conditions best suited to his 
case. The buildings contain also comfortable quarters for 56 
employees, besides the superintendent's family. 

The buildings have been completed and made ready for 
patients within the appropriation, but $5,000 more will be 
necessary to complete the furnishings and equipment of the 
kitchen, laundry, laboratory, etc. 

Heating and Power Plant. 
The power plant promises very satisfactory results although 
it cannot be considered complete until a duplicate generating 
set is installed. From the boiler room a low-pressure main 
for heating the buildings and a high-pressure main for cooking 
and heating water extend to the center of the women's ward, a 
distance of about 800 feet. The electric wires between the 
power house and the buildings (800 feet) are under ground, 
and a pole line carries current about 500 feet to a five horse- 
power motor at the wells. The laundry machinery, which is 
in a room adjacent to the engine room, is driven by a seveu 
and one-half horse-power motor. The buildings will be heated 
by the exhaust from the engine, supplemented by direct steam 
when necessary. 

Grounds. 

Much time and labor will be necessary to finish the clearing 
and grading about the buildings, and completing the walks and 
driveway, but this may be done gradual!}^ by the farm help if 
a small appropriation can be obtained at once for board walks. 
We have alreadj^ a goodly stock of hardy plants and shrubs 
which have been propagated this season. 

Water Supply. 
With considerable difficulty a water supply has been secured 
from driven wells. Although ground water stands only 12 or 
13 feet below the surface, and in sufficient quantity, the forma- 
tion is so fine in many places that the flow of water is too slow 
to make a well. Twelve wells were driven, of which five have 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



27 



been connected with a motor-driven pump, and since early 
August have supplied water to the contractors for the brick- 
work, plastering, granolithic floors, etc. The yield is 50 gal- 
lons per minute, and the quality is reported by the State Board 
of Health to be excellent. A storage tank of 20,000 gallons 
capacity gives satisfactory pressure in all the buildings. 

We have, then, a group of commodious buildings for the care 
of the sick and the comfort of the employees, on a very satis- 
factory site, but without many of the concomitants which would 
make our establishment practical, economical, and complete. 

Barx. 

The sanatorium horses have been stabled up to this time on 
a small farm, which has been rented at $300 per year solely for 
stable accommodations. This farm aftbrded the only barn in 
the vicinity available for our use, and as its appointments are 
entirely inadequate for the proper protection of horses, har- 
nesses, tools, carriages and wagons, it is hoped that a new barn 
may be authorized this year. This farm has yielded us 7 tons 
of hay and 100 bushels of potatoes this season. 

Old House. 

The old house that was on the property has been examined 
by an architect and a builder, who agree that it is a fine speci- 
men of the old style of architecture and well worth saving. 
Being a double house, the expenditure of a small sum of 
money would aflbrd two excellent tenements for married em- 
ployees, besides several rooms for single men. Lakeville 
being a large town whose small population is widely scattered 
it is difficult to find houses to rent, so that our married em- 
ployees will be obliged to locate out of town if we do not 
utilize this old house. Indeed, it would seem advisable to 
also build a modest cottage in connecti(m with the stable, the 
rental of which would enable us to retain the services of a 
good man for comparatively low wages. 

Henhouse. 

The location of this sanatorium is most favorable for the 
production of eggs and poultry, and as much of the waste from 
the kitchen and dining rooms makes excellent poultry food, it 
is highly practicable to undertake the home production of so 



28 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



important a factor in the diet of our patients. The plant 
should be complete, with facilities for cooking the food and 
for hatching and housing the young chicks. 

Gexerator. 

Our power plant is deficient in that we have no duplicate 
generating set to fall back upon in case of a breakdown of the 
one now in operation. Situated as we are, beyond the reach 
of any outside help in electric light and power, a breakdown 
of our present plant, however slight, would have serious re- 
sults, as it would cut ofl'our lights, our water supply and power 
for the laundry. It is recommended that a 25 kilowatt gener- 
ating set be purchased this year, to secure us against a disas- 
trous breakdown. 

Refkigeratixg Plant. 
The question of ice supply in the Cape district presents a 
problem of considerable importance. In this immediate vicin- 
ity ice is seldom harvested more than 6 or 8 inches thick, and 
frequently the winters are so mild that little oi no ice is cut. 
During the summer just passed the price of ice in Middle- 
borough and Lakeville has been 50 cents per hundredweight. 
The local supply is cut from small ponds, or, in case of failure 
of the local crop, is brought from a distance at great expense. 
In either case the purity of the ice for hospital use may well be 
questioned. In such conditions it is highly important that 
the sanatorium should have full control of the purity and 
quantity of its own supply. To this end it is urgently recom- 
mended that an automatic refrigerating plant be installed, of a 
size equivalent to the melting of about two tons of ice, and 
with a capacity for making 400 or 500 pounds of artificial ice 
daily. 

Until the sanatorium is in operation and the patients prop- 
erly classified there is no reason to greatly modify the estimate 
of cost of maintenance as reported last year, which was based 
upon the assumption that we shall admit a large proportion of 
advanced cases (see Appendix B). 

Respectfully submitted, 

SUMXER COOLIDGE, 

Siqjerintendent. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 



29 



EEPORT OF THE WESTFIELD STATE SANATORIUM. 



Dr. Hexky D. Chadwick, Superintendent. 

Westfield, Mass. 

To the Commission on Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Gextlemex : — The general contract for construction was 
signed June 12, 1909. Work since has gone on without inter- 
ruption. Unfortunately, ledge was encountered while excavat- 
ing for two of the buildings, and about 300 cubic yards of rock 
had to be removed, which has made considemble additional 
expense. Unless some unforeseen delay occurs, the contractor 
will complete his work about the first of January, which is 
about three weeks later than the contract called for. 

The group of buildings consists of an administration building, 
which occupies the front and center, the service building in 
the rear, one ward and one shack on the west side for women 
patients and duplicates of these two buildings on the east side 
for men patients. All of the buildings front to the south. 
The closed ward is intended to be used for patients having more 
advanced disease. All portions of this building can be heated. 
It is so arranged that there is a door betw^een each two beds 
opening on a wide porch which runs along the length of both 
sides of the ward. Bed patients will be kept in the open air 
on these porches both day and night, except at such times as 
their condition or inclement weather makes it undesirable. 
There are also six private rooms in each of the closed wards, 
to be used for very sick persons requiring special nursing and 
seclusion. Beds for 47 patients are provided for in each of 
these wards. The shacks are unheated in the sleeping portion 
and therefore must be occupied by early-stage cases, who are 
able to care for themselves without much attention from nurses. 
Beds for 28 patients are provided for in each shack. The 
total capacit}^ of the sanatorium is planned, therefore, to pro- 
vide for 75 men and 75 women, divided as follows: 56 earlv- 



30 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



stage cases in shacks, 82 moderately advanced cases in warm 
wards and 12 far-advanced cases in \Yarm rooms. 

The superintendent's family, the assistant physicians, nurses 
and office employees will have rooms in the administration 
building. In the annex to the service building there are rooms 
for IG men and 16 women. Thus provision is made for 57 
employees besides the superintendent's family. 

Since the first of April I have lived in the farmhouse on the 
property. This was necessary in order to have constant super- 
vision over the construction work. The house, which had been 
unoccupied for some months, was in a very dilapidated condi- 
tion and badly out of repair. The interior of the house has 
been papered and painted and some repairs made. The expense 
of these changes has been $285.63. 

It was found that we could do the trenching for the water 
and steam pipes and install the sewage disposal plant by day 
labor much cheaper than by contract. A marked saving has 
also been made by erecting the water tower and tank in the same 
way. Considerable grading and trucking have been done by 
our own horses, and in addition quite a good sum has been 
earned by carting labor and supplies for the building and heat- 
ing contractors. 

Water Supply. 
Only after driving many test wells in diflferent parts of the 
farm was water found in sufficient quantity to supply our needs. 
Finally water was located about 600 feet east of the buildings. 
Five wells were then driven and a pumping test recently made, 
which shows sufficient water for our present needs. This water 
will be pumped by electric motor into the water main supply- 
ing the buildings ; the surplus will go into a tank of 20,000 
gallons' capacity, which is elevated to give sufficient pressure 
to throw water over the hio^hest roof. This will o^ive some fire 
protection, as a hydrant is placed in front and behind the build- 
ings. Chemical fire extinguishers will be placed on each floor 
of all buildings for additional protection. Water pipes have 
been laid connecting the farmhouse and barn with the sana- 
torium supply. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



31 



Sewage Disposal. 
A filter bed 150 feet square has been constructed about 800 
feet west of the buildings. The soil under the loam which was 
removed is sandy and should be good filtering material. The 
sewer main ends in a concrete tank 24 feet by 8 feet by 9 feet, 
which when full empties itself automatically on the filter bed. 
This bed is divided into four equal parts by dikes, and is so 
arranged that the sewage can be turned from one section to 
another at will. 

Power and Heating. 

Two fifty horse-power high-pressure boilers will furnish steam 
for heating the buildings, the hot- water system, the laundry, 
and for the steam cookers in the kitchen. 

A 35 kilowatt steam turbine and generator will furnish light- 
ing for the buildings, power to run the laundry machinery and 
to pump the water. 

This equipment to be complete needs a duplicate generating 
set. Any mishap or needed repairs to our generator would 
leave us without lights, stop the laundry machinery, and, most 
serious of all, leave us Avithout power to pump the water for 
the usual needs and for fire emergencies. 

Grounds. 

In order to get the proper floor grade it was necessary for 
the contractor to do a large amount of excavating for two of 
the buildings. This left high banks of earth around sections 
of these wards, which in places were 10 feet high. Some of 
this, which was close to the buildings, has already been re- 
moved by our own teams. Measurements show that nearly 
2,500 cubic yards of earth remain, which will have to be re- 
moved in order to get a proper grade about the buildings. 

Roads will have to be built next spring, one in front of the 
buildings and another from the highway to the rear of the ser- 
vice building, for the cartage of coal and supplies. 

Barn. 

There is a large barn on the property, 117 feet by 50 feet, 
and four stories high, including basement. This Avas built 



32 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



about thirty years ago. Few, if any, repairs have been made 
on it in the mean time. The frame is in excellent condition. 
The roof will not need shingling for two or three years. I 
have gone over the matter of alterations and repairs with a 
carpenter, and estimated the cost of such changes as seem de- 
sirable. These, if made, would give us a very good barn, one 
in which 100 tons of hay could be stored, 40 cows could be 
kept, a good horse stable and plenty of carriage and store room 
provided. This year 45 tons of hay were cut on the farm, not- 
withstandins: twentv acres of the best o-rass land were under 
cultivation last year and not seeded to grass in the fall. 

Proposed Repairs and Alterations. 
Convert basement, now used for manure cellar and horse 
stalls, into a cow stable and milk room adjoining. To do this 
it will be necessary to concrete the floor and sheathe the walls 
and ceiling. It is proposed to build a manure shed on the out- 
side of barn and a silo on the west side of the barn, also to 
convert the east end of second story, an area 54 feet by 50 
feet, into a horse stable, carriage and harness room. It is 
proposed to concrete the floor and sheathe the walls and ceiling. 
The harness room should be heated in order to keep the robes 
and harnesses in good condition, and therefore it would be 
necessary to build a chimney. The outside of the barn should 
be clapboarded and painted in order to preserve it and improve 
its appearance. Total estimated expense of above-mentioned 
items, $2,000. 

Farmhouse. 

This is a story and a half house with seven rooms. The 
repairs already done have made the house very comfortable, 
except that plumbing has never been installed. Bath and 
toilet fixtures should be put in. The outside of the house 
needs to be clapboarded and painted and a new piazza built in 
place of the old one, which is beyond repair. Five hundred 
dollars would make all these changes and provide us with a 
farmhouse which would serve very well for the farm foreman 
and some of the hands. 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT 



— 



33 



Piggery. 

It has been shown in other sanatoria that the table refuse can 
be more profitably utilized by feeding it to hogs than in any 
other way. All food which has been once served on the 
patients* table has to be thrown into the garbage barrel. As 
this is infected material it must be boiled before being fed to 
animals. AVhen so disinfected it is p)erfectly safe to feed to 
hogs and they thrive remarkably well on it. Judging from 
experience in other similar institutions we could feed 1.3< > swine 
on the sanatorium garbage and farm products without having 
to buy any grain. We have available land at a sufficient dis- 
tance from our buildings and from neighboring houses where a 
piggery- could be erected. A plan for a building 100 feet by 
24 feet, well ventilated and drained, with a cook house in one 
end, was submitted to a builder for an estimate of cost. This 
he figured would be $1,800 with equipment. 

Hexhouse. 

I should like to build colony houses to accommodate 1,000 
fowls. These could be largely cared for by patients. Aside 
from the eggs produced it is very desirable to buy our table 
poultry alive when opportunity offers and kill them as needed. 
This is economical, and in addition will provide fresh-killed 
poulti-y, which is much appreciated by patients. Cold-storage 
poultry is less nutritious and often unj^ala table. 

Artificial Ice Plant. 
It would be much more economical for us to have an arti- 
ficial ice plant, as otherwise we would have to haiwest our ice 
two miles from the sanatorium and build an ice house in which 
to store it. An artificial ice plant which will produce the 
equivalent of 2 tons of ice and make 250 pounds of ice daily, 
an electric motor for power and refrigerator rooms of sufficient 
size in the basement, and a small one in the kitchen, can be 
installed for $2,. 300. Our present power plant wiU generate 
sufficient electricity, and the expense of this additional power 
will not equal the cost of handling ice. 



34 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 1909. 



Laundry. 

Owing to lack of suflScient money the laundry is inadequately 
equipped with machinery to do the work in an economical way. 
We have no machinery to do starch work, and that will mean 
sending it out to public laundries or hiring more help to do it 
by hand. This is slow and therefore a more expensive method. 
A metallic dry room is also greatly needed. 

Furnishings and Equipment. 
The amount of money available from this appropriation is 
barely enough to equip the buildings in the most meager way. 
It will be necessary to buy more furniture and bedding. More 
equipment is needed in the kitchen, laundry and dining room. 
We should also have a well-equipped laboratory. At least 
$5,000 more will be needed for additional equipment and 
furnishings (see Appendix C). 

Respectfully submitted, 



HENRY D. CHADWICK, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



Appeot)ix a. 



North Readixg State Sanatorium. 



Estimate for Maintenance. 
Salaries, wao;es and labor : — 



Superintendent (per year), . 


$2,500 


00 




Assistant superintendent (per year). 


1,200 


00 




Assistant physician (per year) , 


720 


00 




Superintendent of nurses and matron (per 








year), 


800 


00 




Chief engineer (per year) , . 


1,000 


00 




Head cook and baker (per month). 


58 


33 




Assistant cooks (per month). 


30 


00 




Domestics (per year), .... 


18 


00 to $20 00 


Graduated nurses (per month), 


35 


00 




Attendants and orderlies (per month) , . 


20 


00 to $^ 


50 00 


Head bookkeeper (per month), 


45 


00 




Stenograj^her (per month) , . 


30 


00 




Stable men and teamsters (per month), 


30 


00 




Laborers (per month). 


30 


00 




Laundry help (per month) , . 


30 


00 




Assistant engineers (per month), . 


60 


00 




Foreman (per month), 


50 


00 




Carpenter and painter (per month) , 


60 


00 





Food, 

Clothing and materials. 

Furnishings , 

Heat, light and power : 

Coal, . 

Sundries, 



$5,500 00 
500 00 



Repairs and improvements (materials and labor not on pay 

roll), 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 

Board of horses, $900 00 

Blacksmithing and repairs, . . . 300 00 

Seed and fertilizer, .... 500 00 

Sundries, 300 00 



$26,620 00 
31,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 



6,000 00 
2,000 00 



2,000 00 



Amount carried forward, 



$71,620 00 



38 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forivard, $71,620 00 

Miscellaneous : — 



Sojip and laundry supplies, . . . 


$1,200 


00 


Medicine and hospital supplies, 


2,000 


00 


oLai/ionery , po&t<ige liiiu priiiLiiig^, . . 




00 


Cuspidor supplies, .... 


1,500 


00 


Chapel services and entertainment, 


300 


00 


Telephone and telegraph service, . 


300 


00 


Traveling expenses (officials). 


300 


00 


Books, magazines and periodicals. 


500 


00 


Freight and express charges. 


1,000 


00 


Sundries, ...... 


700 


00 



9,000 00 
$80,620 00 



New Construction, Repairs and Equipment. 



Repairs and additions to barn, ...... $8,000 00 

Hennery, 1,800 00 

Piggery, 1,800 00 

Concrete walks, 500 00 

Duplicate engine and generator, ..... 2,000 00 

Sterilizer, 900 00 

Incinerator, ......... 500 00 

Purchase of land and spur track, ..... 1,000 00 

Furnishings and equipment, . . . . . . 2,500 00 



$19,000 00 



Approjjriation, $105,000 

Payments : — 
Land, surveys, etc., . 
Builders' contract, with deductions, 
Power plant equipment and steamtittin 
Water supply, . 
Grading, 
Plumbing, . 
Laundry equipment, . 
Electric lighting and fixture 
Architect's commission. 
Superintendent's salary, 
Superintendent's expenses. 
Furnishings, 
Miscellaneous, 

Amount carried forward, 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 39 

Amou/it brought forward, ...... $82,793 86 

Sewer, 791 32 

Expenses of commission, ....... 2,937 86 

Horses, wagons, tools, etc., ...... 2,256 35 

$88,779 39 

Additional liabilities 14,622 89 

$103,402 28 

Appropriation $105,000 00 

Payment* and liabilities, 103.402 28 

Balance, ......... .$1,597 72 



40 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Appexbix B. 



Lakeville State Sanatorium. 



Estimate for Maintenance. 



Salaries, wages and labor, . . . . . 






$29,720 00 


Food, ........ 






31,200 00 


Clothing and clothing materials, . . . . 






3,000 00 


Furnishings, ...... 






2,000 00 


Heat, light and power, .... 






6,000 00 


Re^^airs and improvements, .... 






2,000 00 


Farm, stable and gi'ounds, .... 






2,000 00 


Miscellaneous, ...... 






9,000 00 








$84,920 00 


The basis of this estimate is as follows : 








Salaries, wages and labor : — 


Month. 


Tntfll rk<»r 

Month. 


Superintendent, ..... 


$208 


33 


$208 33 


First assistant, ..... 


100 


00 


100 00 


Second assistant, ..... 


60 


00 


60 00 


Third assistant, ..... 


50 


00 


50 00 


Supervisor of nurses, .... 


45 


00 


45 00 


Graduate nurses (6), . 


35 


00 


210 00 


Attendants (13), 


25 


00 


325 00 


Orderlies (4), 


30 


00 


120 00 


Matron, housekeeper and dietition, 


60 


00 


60 00 


V^lilcl CUUK, ...... 


75 


00 


7 ^ no 

t o uu 


Baker, ...... 


60 


00 


60 00 


Assistant cooks (3), .... 


40 


00 


120 00 




20 


00 


900 00 


Chief engineer, ..... 


83 


33 


83 33 


Assistant engineers (3), 


60 


00 


180 00 


Steward, ...... 


100 


00 


100 00 


Treasurer's clerk, .... 


55 


00 


55 00 


General helper, ..... 


40 


00 


40 00 


Farm foreman, ..... 


65 


00 


65 00 


Laborers (5), 


30 


00 


150 00 


Laundry man, 


35 


00 


35 00 


Laundry women (3), .... 


25 


00 


75 00 


Carpenter and painter. 


60 


00 


60 00 


Total per month, . . . . . 






$2,476 66 


Total per year, . . . . . 






$29,720 00 



1909.] PL"BLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 41 



Food: — 

150 patients, at .$4 per week, $31,200 00 

Clothing and clothing materials.^ 3,000 00 

Furnishing? 2,000 00 

Heat, light and power : — 

Coal, bituminous, 1,000 tons, at $4.0'.'. -$4,500 00 

Coal, anthracite, 150 tons, at $7. . 1,050 00 

Oil, waste, packing, wood and sundries. 450 00 



6,000 00 

Repairs and improvements : — 

Cement, lumber, paint, oil, glass, electric work and sup- 
plies, hardware, mechanics* labor not on pay roll, 
plumbing, steam fitting and supplies. . . 2,000 00 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 



Horses (5, at $16 per month each). 


^60 00 


Blacksmith. . . 


100 00 


Fertilizer and seed, .... 


400 00 


Carriage and wagon repairs, 


100 00 


Harness repairs, ..... 


50 00 


Labor not on pay roll. .... 


100 00 


Tools and farming implements. 


250 00 


Sundries, ...... 


40 '>:' 


cellaneous : — 




Soap and laundry supplies, . 


$1,000 00 


Medicine and hospital supplies. 


2,000 00 


Stationery and office supplies. 


250 00 




350 00 


Printing and printing supplies. 


500 00 


Cuspidor supplies. .... 


1,400 00 


Chapel services and entertainment 


250 00 


Telephone and telegraph service. 


350 00 


Traveling expenses (officials). 


300 00 




1,200 00 


Books, magazines and periodicals. 


100 00 


Freight and express charges. 


800 00 




5C»0 0<) 



2,000 00 



9,000 00 



1 Inasmuch as a proportion of patients admitted to the new sanatoria are chanty 

cases, a special appropriation for proTiding warm clothing is desirable. 



42 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



New Construction, Repairs and Equipment. 

New barn, with quarters for farm help, .... $12,200 00 

Repairs on old house, 1,800 00 

Poultry houses and poultry, 1,800 00 

Duplicate generating set, ....... 1,500 00 

Refrigerating machine, 2,500 00 

Incinerator, ......... 500 00 

Plank or gravel walks, ....... 500 00 

Screens, 1,000 00 

Furnishings and equipment, ...... 5,000 00 



$26,800 00 

Appropriation, $105,000. 

Payments : — 

Land surreys, etc., $4,735 81 

Builders' contract, with deductions, . . . . . 38,702 17 

Power plant equipment and steam fitting, .... 8,078 17 

Water supply, 2,97266 

Grading and building driveway, . . . . '. . 698 57 

Plumbing, 1,248 00 

Laundry equipment, ........ 300 00 

Electric lighting and fixtures, 999 17 

Architect's commission, ....... 2,429 87 

Superintendent's salary, ....... 2,590 28 

Superintendent's expenses, . . . . . . 502 10 

Furnishings, . . . . . . . . . 523 51 

Miscellaneous, . . . . . . . . . 759 65 

Sewer 145 30 

Expenses of commission, ....... 2,937 86 

Horses, wagons, etc., . . . . . . . 2,499 30 

Draining pond, ......... 324 31 

Tools, . . . . • 206 74 



$70,653 47 

Additional liabilities, 28,864 17 



$99,517 64 

Appropriation, $105,000 00 

Payments and liabilities, . . . . . . . 99,517 64 



Balance for furnishings, commission's expenses, etc., . $5,482 36 



1909.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



43 



Appendix C. 



Westfield State Sanatorium. 
Estimate for Maintenance. 



Salaries, wao^es and labor : — 



Superintendent (per year), . 


$2,500 


00 


Assistant superintendent (per year), 


1,200 


00 


Assistant physician (per year), . 


720 


00 


Third assistant physician (per year), . 


600 


00 


Steward (per year), .... 


1,200 


00 


Superintendent of nurses and matron 






(per year), ..... 


900 


00 


Chief engineer (per year) , . 


1,000 


00 


Chief cook (per month) , . . . 


75 


00 


Baker (per month), .... 


60 


00 


Assistant cooks (2, at 840 per month), 


80 


00 


Domestics (10, at $20 per month), 


200 


00 


Graduation nurses (6, at §35 per 






month), ...... 


210 


00 


Attendants and orderlies (14, at $30 






per month) ...... 


420 


00 


Head bookkeeper (per month) , . 


45 


00 


Stenographer (per month), . 


40 


00 


Stablemen and teamsters (3, at $30 per 






month), ...... 


90 


00 


Laborers (5, at $30 per month), . 


150 


00 


Laundry help (4, at $30 per month), . 


120 


00 


Assistant engineers (3, at $60 per 






month), ...... 


180 


00 


Foreman (per month) , . . . 


75 


00 



Food, 

Clothing and materials. 

Furnishings, 

Heat, light and power : 

Coal, . 

Sundries, 



$5,500 00 
500 00 



$29,060 00 
31,000 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 



6,000 00 



Amount carried forivarcl. 



$71,060 00 



44 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amount hrought forward, 



i71,060 00 



Repairs and improvements (material and labor not on pay 

roll), 

Farm, stable and oT-ounds : — 



Board of horses, ..... 


$900 


00 


Blacksmithing and repairs, . 


300 


00 


Seed and fertilizer, .... 


500 


00 


Sundries, ...... 


300 


00 


cellaneous : — 






Soap and laundry supplies, . 


$1,000 


00 


Medicine and hospital supplies, 


2,000 


00 


Stationery and office sup^^lies. 


250 


00 


jruoia.^c, ...... 


ooyj 


no 


Printing and printing supplies, 


500 


00 


Cuspidor supplies, .... 


1,400 


00 


ChajDel services and entertainments. 


250 


00 


Telephone and telegraph service, 


350 


00 


Traveling expenses (officials), 


300 


00 


Ice, ....... 


1,200 


00 


Books, magazines and periodicals, 


100 


00 


Freight and express charges. 


800 


00 


Sundries, ...... 


500 


00 



2,000 00 



2,000 00 



9,000 00 
$84,060 00 



New Construction, Eej^airs mid Equipment 
Grading and roads. 
Alterations and repairs to barn, . 
Repairs to farmhouse, . 

Piggery, 

Poultry houses and poultry. 
Artificial ice plant. 
Duplicate generator set, 
Coal bunker adjoining boiler room. 
Farm implements. 
Incinerator, .... 
Covered corridor between administration and service building 
and plank or gravel walks between the shacks and wards 
Live stock needed : — 

50 hogs, at 87 each, ...... 

40 cows, at $65 each, ...... 

Screens for buildings, ....... 

Furnishings and equipment, ..... 



$2,500 00 
2,000 00 
500 00 
1,800 00 
1,800 00 
2,500 00 
1,500 00 
200 00 
300 00 
500 00 

450 00 

350 00 
2,600 00 
1,000 00 
5,000 00 

$23,000 00 



1909.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 45 

Ai^propriation, $105,000. 

Payments : — 

Land, surveys, etc., ........ $6,537 48 

Builders' contract, with deductions, . . . . . 34,963 92 

Power plant equipment and steam fitting, .... 3,366 70 

Water supply, 2,391 81 

Grading, 575 00 

Plumbing, . . . 1,700 00 

Architect's and engineer's commissions, .... 1,800 00 

Superintendent's salary, . . . . . . . 1,720 42 

Superintendent's expenses, ....... 998 59 

Furnishings, 278 81 

Sewer, 803 76 

Miscellaneous, ......... 485 38 

Expenses of commission, 2,937 87 

Horses, wagons, etc., ....... 1,646 88 

Tools, 250 00 

Repair of house on property for superintendent, . . . 302 65 



$60,759 27 

Additional liabilities, 36,648 74 



$97,408 01 

Appropriation, $105,000 00 

Payments and liabilities, 97,408 01 



Balance for furnishings, commission's expenses, etc.. 



$7,591 99 



Public Document 



No. 77 



FOURTH ANXUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Teustees of Massachusetts Hospitals 
FOE Consumptives. 



November 30, 1910. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1911. 



Approved by 
The State Boaed of Publication. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Trustees, 5 

Report of the Trustees, ....... 7 

Report of the North Reading State Sanatorium, . . 24 

Report of the Lakeville State Sanatorium, ... 45 

Report of the Westfield State Sanatorium, ... 66 

Report of the Rutland State Sanatorium, . . . 87 



TRUSTEES. 



Arthur T. Cabot, M.D., Chairman. 
Arthur Drinkwatee. Willloi C. Godfrey. 

George A. Dunx. Sylvia B. K^n-owlton. 

Albert C. Getchell_, M.D. William D. McFee, M.D. 



JOHX B. Ha WES, 2d, M.D., Secretary. 



3 Joy Street, Boston. 



€l)e CommonrDcaltl) of itla05a£l)U0£tt0. 



EEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF MASSACHUSETTS 
HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



To His Excellency the Governor of the Commonwealth and to the 
Honorable Council. 

In accordance with the terms of the act establishing this 
Board (chapter 474 of the Acts of 1907) the Board submits 
the following report : — 

On Feb. 6, 1910, the Westfield State Sanatorium, the last 
of the three institutions authorized under the terms of this act, 
was completed. Section 15 of this act provides that, " upon the 
completion of the sanatoriums as herein provided, the trustees 
shall assume and exercise all the powers and duties in respect 
to the sanatorium at Rutland now pertaining to the trustees of 
that institution, and upon such completion, the powers of the 
said last named trustees, in respect to the said sanatorium, 
shall cease." In accordance with this act, therefore, Upon the 
completion of the Westfield State Sanatorium the former Board 
of Trustees of the Rutland State Sanatorium ceased to exist, 
and the administration of that institution was transferred to 
this Board. 

This act (chapter 474, Acts of 1907) also states that when 
the said sanatoriums have been completed, and the governor 
has issued a proclamation declaring them ready for the admis- 
sion of patients as hereinafter provided, the representatives of 
the board of charity, and of the board of health designated above, 
shall cease to act, and the administration of the three sana- 
toriums shall be vested in the remaining seven, who shall act 
as a board of trustees." In accordance with the act, therefore, 
the terms of office of Mr. Charles H. Adams of the State Board 



8 



HOSPITALS FOR C0XSU:MPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



of Charity and of Mr. Charles H. Porter of the State Board of 
Health expired, and they ceased to be members of the Board. 

In January. 1910. Mr. Alvah Crocker of Fitchburg resigned 
from the Board and ALr. George A. Dunn of Gardner was ap- 
pointed by Governor Draper to take his place. In June, 1910, 
AErs. Sylvia B. Knowlton was reappointed a member of the 
Board. 

Within a few weeks after the official opening of each sana- 
torium the full quota of patients was reached, and there is now 
a long waiting list for each institution. The average of this list 
for the last six months has been about 130 men and 45 women. 
At times the waiting list has been larger than this, although 
the proportion of men to women has remained about the same. 
The average length of stay of patients at the three new sanatoria 
is about three months. A man applying for admission is obliged 
to wait nearly four weeks before his name can be reached, and 
a woman two weeks. 

It is the intention of the Board to keep patients at these in- 
stitutions iintil they are either cured of the disease, or its 
progress sufficiently arrested to permit of their going home and 
returning to their work, or until death has occurred. Although 
this is the policy of the Board, and the superintendents make 
every effort to keep patients in the institutions, there is a con- 
siderable number in the advanced and therefore the most in- 
fectious and dangerous stages of the disease who, when it is 
evident that their condition is constantly growing worse, are 
taken home by their friends and relative to die. There are also 
many patients in the earlier stages of the disease who feel that 
they must return to their work and support their families, and 
who, therefore, leave the sanatoria before the disease is ar- 
rested or cured. On the other hand, the number of patients who 
have shown improvement is gratifying. Although the great 
majority of those admitted are in the moderately advanced or 
advanced stages of the disease, many patients have been dis- 
charged with the disease arrested, and a few who entered in the 
advanced stages have been returned to comparative health. 

As the sanatorium grounds are made more attractive, and 
recreation pavilions and other arrangements for the amusement 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



9 



and occupation of patients are provided, it will be easier to 
hold patients for a longer time. That this is already being 
brought about is shown by the fact that many of the patients 
expect to stay during the entire winter, or until cured. 

Regulatiox of Work. 

Many of the patients at the sanatoria are too weak to move 
about. Their disease is in an active stage and they are feverish, 
and for them the important thing is to rest, and if possible to 
recover enough strength to throw off the disease. For such 
patients the sanatoria afford the opportunity to take this needed 
rest under favorable conditions in the fresh air. Other patients 
have considerable strength and are not feverish. For them the 
problem is to supply a healthy mode of life in the open air. 
They do not require absolute rest; indeed, complete inactivity 
is harmful to them, for while they gain flesh they do not gain 
the strength that enables them to bear fatigue. Such patients, 
treated by rest alone, when they leave the sanatoria to resume 
their ordinary modes of life are apt to lose all the advantage 
they have gained, and suffer a relapse of their disease. 

It is important for these patients to have sufficient regulated 
exercise to improve their muscular power and to fit them to 
resume their ordinary occupations when they return to their 
homes. It also promotes their cure and improves their general 
condition of health to give them some regular occupation, grad- 
uated to the strength of the individual patient, — an occupation 
that will exercise their minds as well as their muscles. Com- 
plete idleness is not a healthy state ; it is recognized that every 
sanatorium should supply some occupation for the patients com- 
mitted to its charge. 

It is our aim to meet this requirement in the sanatoria under 
our supervision, and to provide for our patients some light work 
prescribed by the physician and carefully graduated to the 
strength of the individual patient. We are meeting with some 
resistance to this plan on the part of the patients, some of them 
objecting because they have been led to believe that complete 
rest is the sine qua non of treatment in all cases, and some be- 
cause they simply object to work, and feel that their payment 



10 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



of $4 a week to the sanatorium entitles them to a life of leisure 
there. 

Both of these objections are due to false conceptions and 
misunderstandings and are gradually being overcome. It is 
obviously absurd to regard the relations of a patient to the 
sanatorium as those of a boarder to the summer hotel. 

The work prescribed for patients is prescribed for their own 
good ; it is important, in order that the sanatoria may accom- 
plish their best results, that the system of work be cheerfully 
accepted and carried out. The right-minded patient should feel 
pleased if the small task which affords him healthful exercise 
and occupation makes some slight return to the State for its 
care of him, and perhaps assists in the preparation of a croquet 
ground, a lawn or flower bed, to make the place more attractive 
for those who are to come after him. In some instances a stay 
in a sanatorium gives opportunity for a patient who has always 
worked indoors to acquire some skill in outdoor pursuits, which 
will enable him to find healthful and remunerative occupation 
after the disease is arrested. 

In every sanatorium we have ex-patients on our pay roll, and 
we may expect in future to secure many permanent employees 
among those who have learned their duties while assisting as 
patients in the institution. We have now at the four State 
sanatoria over 100 ex-patients on the pay roll. Ex-patients thus 
employed continue to be under the observation of the physi- 
cians ; they live hygienically and do their work in the open air, 
thus guarding in the fullest degree against relapse. Such em- 
ployment of ex-patients in the sanatoria is a not inconsiderable 
contribution to the solution of the problem of how to obtain 
work for arrested cases. It is carrying on, in the most efficient 
and practical way possible, a farm colony for discharged pa- 
tients, without any extra expense to the State. 

Separatioi^" of the Sexes. 

The Board of Trustees is of the opinion that it is unwise to 
treat patients of both sexes in the same institution. The argTi- 
ments for a separation of the sexes are as follows : — 

1. Such an arrangement would do away with opportunity 
for scandals likely to arise in mixed hospitals, where many of 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 



11 



the patients are comparatively well. Such scandals have arisen 
in the past. and. despite constant watchfulness, are apt to arise 
in the future under existing conditions. We are told that 
among the clergy are some who advise their female parishioners 
not to go tc sanatoria where both sexes are admitted. This is a 
real and ever-present difficulty. In our sanatoria the stringent 
rule that no two patients of opposite sexes shall speak to each 
other under penalty of immediate discharge has to be rigidly 
enforced. 

2. It would give the patients much more freedom to roam 
about the grounds. At present no patient has more than one- 
half the grotmds to wander about in without encroaching on 
the territorv set aside for the other sex. 

3. It would make it easier to enlarge the accommodation of 
the present sanatoria to house a considerably larger number of 
patients. In the summer, tents could be extensively used, which 
would greatly increase the number of beds available. This is 
especially true of the three sanatoria which in the about-to-be- 
described plan are set aside for men ; thus the great number 
of men applying could be accommodated. The present cooking 
and dining plants would take care of this increased number if 
they were all of one sex, and at each sanatoritim there is suffi- 
cient heating capacity to warm several new wards, which could 
be easily and cheaply built were the patients all men. In this 
way our winter accommodations could be enlarged at compara- 
tively smaU cost. 

Objections to such an arrangement would doubtless be raised 
in that it would involve treating in one institution patients in 
all stages of the disease. This has been carefully considered. 
Letters were written to the leading authorities on the subject in 
Europe and America. The opinions expressed by these gentle- 
men have been almost unanimous in stating that it is practically 
impossible to maintain an instittition for incipient cases of 
tuberculosis alone, but that an arrangement by means of which 
the early cases can be treated in open pavilions and the ad- 
vanced cases in closed wards, with separate rooms for the very- 
sick patients, in one institution, is the only satisfactory solution 
of the problem. 

In order, therefore, to arrange this separation of the sexes. 



12 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTRTS 



[Dec. 



the Board of Trustees plans to set aside the Rutland State 
Sanatorium as an institution for women alone, and to reserve 
the three remaining sanatoria at Lakeville; Xorth Reading and 
Westfield solely for men. This plan would give 350 beds for 
women, and a number of beds for men which could easily be 
brought up to over 500. This proportion of beds for men and 
women would approximately agree with the proportion of ap- 
plications from male and female patients on our waiting list. 

On Xov. 15, 1910. a hearing was given representatives of the 
Massachusetts Homoeopathic Medical Society to present their 
objections to this plan. The chief objection brought up at this 
hearing was that, according to the proposed arrangsment, male 
patients would be deprived of the benefits of homoeopathic treat- 
ment. In view of this the Board of Trustees has requested the 
superintendents of the three sanatoria at Xorth Reading, Lake- 
ville and Westfield to be on the lookout for snitable medical 
assistants from homoeopathic medical schools in order that those 
patients who desire it may receive homoeopathic treatment. 

Peovisiois^ foe Cheldbzx. 

There is urgent need for a proper place to treat consumptive 
children. The Board believes it to be unwise to place young 
children in wards among older patients, and as a general rule 
does not admit to the State sanatoria children under fifteen 
years of age. There should be either a separate institution for 
such children or a ward provided for them at the Hospital 
School for Crippled Children in Canton: or, better still, small 
local hospitals, where these children can be near their parents 
and frequently visited by them. 

Every effort is made to bring about the fullest cooperation 
between the State sanatoria and the local health authorities, 
public and private. Upon the arrival of any patient at a sana- 
torium the local board of health is notified, in order that the 
premises which he had occupied may be properly cleaned and 
disinfected: likewise, upon the discharge of any patient the 
local board of health, the State health inspector in charge of that 
district and the local anti-tuberculosis association are informed, 
in order that the patient may be followed up at home, and made 



1910.] PL-BLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 13 



to live according to those rules which he has learned at the sana- 
torium and which are so necessary for the preservation of his 
own health and the safety of others. 

Educational Wobx. 

During the past year the Board has been active in carrying 
on a campaign of educational work throughout the State. As in 
previous years, bulletins on important and vital subjects have 
been sent out every two weeks to nearly 200 newspapers in the 
State : many letters have been written in answer to inquiries in 
regard to the State sanatoria and the general subject of tubercu- 
losis; the secretary of the Board has had numerous personal 
interviews with physicians, patients and their friends or rela- 
tives, who come to the office in constantly increasing numbers 
for information and advice. Much literature in the way of 
reprints, cards, reports, pamphlets, etc, is kept on hand for 
distribution. Members of the Board, the four superintendents 
and the secretary have given lectures to large numbers of people 
on the general subject of tuberculosis, and the four superintend- 
ents have given ntmierous informal talks to their patients. The 
monthly paper, for some years past issued at the Rutland State 
Sanatorium, has been enlarged to include news and items of 
interest from the four sanatoria. This journal is now called 
the Bulletin of the State Sanatoria." In it will be printed 
letters from discharged patients from each institution, and ar- 
ticles of interest to patients and their friends in regard to tuber- 
culosis, its prevention and cure. 

In April. 1910. Governor Draper signed a bill, introduced 
by the Associated Committees of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society for the Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis, ap- 
propriating the sum of $1,000 for school tuberculosis exhibits. 
The expenditure of this money and the preparation and dis- 
tribution of these exhibits were to be done under the supervision 
of this Board. After careful study twenty exhibits have been 
prepared, which are designed to demonstrate, by means of pho- 
tographs and mottoes, the general subject of how to live and 
its relation to the prevention and cure of tuberculosis. 

These exhibits are being distributed through the cities and 



14 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



towns to serve as examples to the school committees, in the ex- 
pectation that they will realize their value and supply them- 
selves w^ith a number of exhibits sufficient to meet the needs of 
the schools in their charge. 

We have made arrangements with the maker of these exhibits 
to supply them at a price of $35 each, which seems a reasonable 
compensation for the work involved. The accompanying table 
shows where the loan exhibits are now placed, and also shows 
what places have purchased exhibits under thp above plan. 

The loan exhibits, which are the property of the State, will 
be moved from place to place in order that they may become 
widely known. 



Loaned. 

5 



School Tuberculosis Exhibits. 

Boston, city of, ...... . 

Boston Association for Relief and Control of Tuberculosis 
Brookline Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 
Cambridge Anti-Tuberculosis Association, 
Canton, 
Chelsea, 
Chicopee, 
Clinton, 
Fitchburg, 
Gardner, 
Holyoke, 
Lawrence, 
Pittsfield, 
Springfield 
Worcester, 

Exhibits under construction or awaiting distribution, 8. 



Bought. 

5 



Work Geneeax. 
Each year of our work shows an enlargement of the field we 
must cover. 

In the past year, since the three new sanatoria were opened, 
this Board has had to assume the care and responsibility for the 
management of the four State sanatoria, widely separated and 
somewhat inaccessible. In order to properly watch and super- 
vise these the Board has divided itself into four visiting com- 
mittees, each responsible for one sanatorium. 

At each monthly meeting the four superintendents have pre- 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



15 



sented a report, which has been discussed by the whole Board. 
In addition to this the chairman has visited all the sanatoria at 
intervals, and has been in frequent personal communication with 
the superintendents. 

The duty of forming and distributing the school exhibits, 
ordered by the last Legislature, has been performed in our office 
by the secretary and chairman. 

Within the i^ast year the special examinations for the Rutland 
State Sanatorium have been discontinued and a general plan 
for the admission of patients to all four sanatoria has been 
adopted, which, doing away with special examiners, has effected 
a saving to the State of about $2,500, but entails a good deal of 
work by our office force. 

Under the present plan any regular practicing physician can 
recommend a patient for admission. He fills out an application 
blank provided from our office, and after this is received the 
patient is allotted to the sanatorium which seems most suitable 
for him, preferably the one nearest his home, except in the early 
cases, where a preference for the Rutland State Sanatorium is 
expressed. This plan has worked satisfactorily, and has been 
favorably received by the medical profession, who had before, in 
some instances, commented unfavorably on the plan of special 
examinations for Rutland. 

The above-described increase of the work of our Board makes 
it plain that it is impossible for a set of busy men to visit the 
sanatoria in the manner prescribed by section 11, chapter 474, 
Acts of 1907. 

It is important, therefore, that the trustees should have the 
assistance in the above work of a competent medical man, who 
should give his whole time to it. Moreover, the work of the 
sanatoria is closely connected with the anti-tuberculosis work 
in many cities and towns, and it is of gi-eat importance that the 
closest co-operation among all agencies working against tubercu- 
losis in the State should be fostered and directed. 

Tt is most proper that this direction and fostering care should 
be exerted by the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives, who 
have charge of the sanatoria which must be the backbone of any 
system of State control. 

After long study and consideration of the work now in our 



16 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



handsj and with a realization of the need of a uniform plan and 
system patiently and intelligently adhered to, we feel that it 
is almost imperative that our Board shall have an executive 
secretary, who to a medical training unites a capacity for ad- 
ministration. Such a secretary would carry on the traditions 
of the work of a Board the personnel of which is always liable 
to change. He would have time and opportunity to master the 
details of our work, would keep the trustees constantly informed, 
and could pursue such investigations as the Board might direct 
in regard to the management of other sanatoria from which we 
might learn facts important to the management of our own. 
Such a man would, we believe, effect economies which would 
many times offset his salary. More important than this, how- 
ever, he would enable us to carry on the work against tubercu- 
losis in such a manner as to get the best results from all the 
measures the State is putting in operation. 

It may be proper to point out here that the commission or- 
dered by the last Legislature " to investigate and report upon a 
system of caring for tuberculosis patients by State and local 
authorities " advises that a subsidy of $5 per week be paid for 
each nonpaying patient in a local hospital which meets with the 
approval of the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives, etc. 

If this plan is carried into effect it will put the local hospitals 
for tuberculosis throughout the State under the supervision of 
this Board. This will call for much visitation, first to deter- 
mine what hospitals shall be approved, and afterwards to ensure 
that a standard of efficiency acceptable to the State is main- 
tained in them. 

From the above consideration it seems clear that this Board 
should have at its disposal a medical health officer of high class, 
who should have a salary of at least $5,000. We respectfully 
ask permission to seek out and engage a man fitted for these 
duties. 

Annual Report. 
According to the present law this Board of Trustees is en- 
titled to only 50 copies of the annual report for its own use and 
for distribution. In order to do active and efficient work against 
tuberculosis we have a long list of correspondents, from whom 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



17 



we get advice and information and from whom we expect re- 
ports of the work that they are doing. We also feel that it is 
important to see that this report reaches a large proportion of 
the really active and influential practicing physicians in the 
State. We feel, therefore, that we could distribute 1,000 copies 
to the great advantage and furtherance of the campaign against 
tuberculosis, and would request the necessary legislation to pro- 
vide us with these extra copies of this report. 

DiSBUESEMENTS. 

The office disbursements May 5, 1910, to Nov. 30, 1910, have 
been as follows : — 

Appropriation, $3,700 00 

Salary of secretary, $1,140 20 

Salary of stenographer, 561 79 

Stationery, office supplies, printing, etc., . . 868 24 

Rent of offices, 399 97 

Expenses of trustees, 123 91 

Press clippings, 35 00 

Telephone, 57 80 

Extra clerical assistance, 98 22 

Electric lighting, 6 84 



The estimates for the maintenance of this office for the com- 
ing year, all of which have been approved by the State Board 
of Charity, are as follows : — 

Salaries of secretary and stenographer, including extra 



$3,291 97 



clerical hire. 



$3,200 00 
800 00 



Office rent. 



Miscellaneous expenses, including telephone, stationery 
and supplies, printing of the annual report, and travel- 
ing expenses of trustees and office force, . 



1,100 00 



$5,100 00 



I^ORTH Reading State Sanatorium. 
The I^"orth Reading State Sanatorium, which was opened 
Sept. 22, 1909, has now been in operation for over a year. In 



18 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUiNIPTRIES. 



[Dec. 



February, 1910, the full capacity of the institution was reached. 
Since that time, up to the beginning of summer, the number of 
patient? varied from 140 to 150. During the summer months, 
by means of tents, a dozen extra beds were provided, so that on 
an average approximately 160 patients have been accommodated 
for the past six months. The waiting list for this institution, 
which draws its patients not only from Boston but from the 
cities of Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, Salem, Cambridge, Haverhill, 
Xewburyport, etc.. has been constantly increasing, and is much 
larger than that of any of the other three institutions. 

AVhen this sanatorium was built over a deep bed of sand and 
gravel it was believed that the disposal of the sewage would be 
a comparatively simple matter. The system that was installed 
under the advice of a competent engineer has proved insufficient, 
owing to a wholly unexpected impermeability of the soil. Up 
to the present time we have met the difficulty in a fairly satis- 
factory manner by means of long filtration trenches. It is 
quite evident, however, that the permanent disposal of the sew- 
age must be provided for in a more efficient manner, and we 
later in this report ask for a special appropriation to enable us 
to accomplish this. 

The estimates for the coming year, all of which have been 
approved by the State Board of Charity, are as follows : — 

Salaries and wages, $27,500 00 

Food, 30,278 00 

Clothing and clothing material, . . . 1,500 00 

Furnishings, 2,500 00 

Heat, light and power, .... 5,000 00 

Repairs and improvements, . , 4,000 00 

Farm, stable and gTounds, . . . 2,000 00 

Miscellaneous, 6,222 00 



The Lakeville State Sanatorium was declared open by Gov- 
ernor Draper Jan. 6, 1910. The full capacity of the institution 
was reached in June, 1910. Since that time the sanatorium 



$79,000 00 



For special appropriations : — 
Sewage purification works, . 



$3,800 00 



Lakevilxe State Sanatorium. 



1910.] PL-BLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 19 



has been kept fnll. and during the snnuner a few extra beds 
were provided, making it possible to maintain an average of 
about 160 patients. 

The grounds have beea greatly improved and made attractive 
with numerous fruit trees, shrubs and flowers. 

The estimates for the coming year, all of which have been 
approved by the State Board of Charity, are as follows : — 



Salaiies and wages. $30,020 00 

Food, 30,000 00 

Clothing materials. L500 00 

Furnishings, 2.500 00 

Heat, hght and power, .... 5.000 00 

Keparrs and improvemoits. . 2.000 00 

Farm, stable and grounds. .... 2.500 00 

IfoedlazieouB^ 7,000 00 

$80,520 00 

For special appropriatioiis : — 

Recreation and employment building, Sl^S^^K) 00 

Poultry house and poultry, . IJJOO 00 

Additional wells far water supply. . 500 00 

Extension of sewerage system, . . 500 00 

Fence about sanatorium grounds, . . SOO 00 

$4,600 00 



Westfiexd State SA:?rATOEn::vi. 
The Westfield State Sanatorium was opened by proclamation 
of Governor Draper Feb. 6, 1910. This institution, situated 
on a high hill overlooking the Westfield River and valley, has 
one of the most beautiful locations of any institution in the 
State. Until comparatively recently there were not enough 
applications for admission to this institution from the western 
part of the State to fill the vacancies. Such vacancies, accord- 
ingly, have been filled by those patients from the east who 
signified their willingness or desire to enter. For the past few 
months there have been a sufficient number of applications from 
Pittsfield, Westfield, Springfield. Holyoke. Chicopee. Xorth 
Adams. Gardner, etc.. to keep this institution full, with a wait- 
iDg list. In Jime, 1910, the full capacity of the institution 
was reached. As in the other institutions, the superintendent 
has been able to provide a few extra beds during the summer. 



20 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



so that the average quota of patients during the past few months 
has been about 160. 

In our last report we urged the purchase of an adjoining 
farm, from which we believed there was danger of pollution 
of our water supply. The accompanying correspondence be- 
tween this Board and the State Board of Health is self-explana- 
tory, and fully sets forth the need of the purchase of this land. 

The Common-wealth op Massachusetts, 

Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives, 

3 Joy Street, Boston, Nov. 7, 1910. 

Massachusetts State Board of Health, State House, Boston. 

Gentlemen : — Understanding that the chairman of your Board 
has recently visited the sanatorium at Westfield, and has examined 
the water supply to that institution with the engineer of your Board, 
the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives would be happy to have 
an expression of opinion from you as to the desirability of acquiring 
any adjoining property, with the object of protecting the water supply 
of that sanatorium from possible pollution. 

Respectfully yours, 

(Signed) Arthur T. Cabot^ 

Chairman. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Office of the State Board of Health, 

State House, Boston, Dec. 1, 1910. 

To the Commission on Hospitals for Consumptives, Arthur T. Cabot^ 
M.D., Chairman, 3 Joy Street, Boston, Mass. 
Gentlemen : — The State Board of Health has considered your 
request of Nov. 7, 1910, for advice as to the desirability of acquiring 
additional lands, with the object of protecting the water supply now 
used by the Westfield State Sanatorium from possible pollution, and 
has examined the results of analyses of samples of water from the 
wells from which the supply of the institution has been drawn during 
the year 1910. 

It appears that the population at the institution during the past 
few months has been in the neighborhood of 200, and that the quantity 
of water used has amounted to about 20,000 gallons per day. This 
quantity has apparently been obtained from the wells without serious 
difficulty during the very dry months of the past summer and fall. 

The results of the analyses of samples of water from the wells 
collected during the past six months are similar to those of the samples 
collected last year, though there has been an improvement, especially 
as to the quantity of iron present in the water. The water still shows 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 77. 



21 



evidence of previous pollution, which, judging from the results of 
recent investigations, is caused very largely by the pollution of the 
ground water at and in the neighborhood of the dwelling house near 
the highway northwest of the wells. The experience of the past year 
indicates that, if the present sources of water supply should be properly 
protected, an adequate quantity of water of suitable quality for the 
requirements of the institution, as at present developed, can be obtained 
from these wells, but if the water should not be protected, and the 
quality should become objectionable, the cost of securing an adequate 
su^>ply of good water from some other source would be a serious one. 

Considering the circumstances, it is advisable, in the opinion of the 
Board, for the trustees to secure control of the dwelling house and land 
north of the wells between the highway and the brook, and, when con- 
trol has been secured, the occupation of the dwelling house and the 
cultivation of the land should be discontinued. 

By order of the Board, 

(Signed) Mark W. Richardson^ 

Secretary. 



The estimates for the coining year, all of which have been 
approved by the State Board of Charity, are as follows : — 



Salaries and wages, $29,140 00 

Food, 30,000 00 

Clothing materials, 1,500 00 

Furnishings, 2,500 00 

Heat, light and power, .... 5,000 00 

Repairs and improvements, . . . 2,500 00 

Farm, stable and grounds, .... 2,300 00 

Miscellaneous, 7,060 00 

For special appropriations : — 

Recreation and employment building, . $1,800 00 

Purchase of farm now owned by Mrs. 
Andrew Pignatare, containing 40 acres 
of land, dwelling house and outbuild- 
ings, installation of plumbing and sewer, 

repairs on house and fencing property, . 4,000 00 

Purchase of 20 cows, .... 1,500 00 

Enlarging locker rooms and diet kitchens 

and additional piazzas, .... 1,000 00 

Grading, 1,000 00 



$80,000 00 



$9,300 00 



22 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 



Rutland State Sanatorium. 

As stated earlier in tliis report, according to the terms of the 
act creating this Board, at the completion of the three new in- 
stitutions the Eiitland Board ceased to exist, and this Board took 
over the administration of the Rutland State Sanatorium. 

It is the policy of the Board, for the present at least, to re- 
serve the Rutland sanatorium for those patients in the incipient 
or in the moderately advanced stage of the disease. When pos- 
sible, patients in the advanced stages of the disease are sent to 
that institution nearest their home. 

The law is still in force which states that preference shall be 
given, at the Rutland State Sanatorium, to citizens of this 
country. During the past year at the Rutland State Sanatorium 
197 women, although bona fide residents of this State, were re- 
fused admission to that institution on account of noncitizenship. 
The Board of Trustees is in favor of repealing this law. 

In June, 1910, Dr. Frederick L. Hills, superintendent of 
the Rutland State Sanatorium, handed in his resignation. The 
position of superintendent was offered to Dr. P. Challis Bart- 
lett, superintendent of the Xew Hampshire State Sanatorium, 
formerly assistant superintendent at Rutland. Dr. Bartlett 
accepted this offer, and on June 23, 1910, was appointed super- 
intendent of the Rutland State Sanatorium. 

In August, 1910, Dr. George Lapham, for a number of 
years first assistant superintendent of the Rutland State Sana- 
torium, resigned his position in order to go into private prac- 
tice. This resignation was accepted with gi'eat regret by the 
Board of Trustees. 

The estimates for the coming year, all of which have been 
approved by the State Board of Charity, are as follows : — 



Salaries and wages, $63,000 00 

Food, 78,000 00 

Heat, light and power, .... 14,000 00 

Repairs and improvements, . . . 3,000 00 

Fumishing-s, 3,500 00 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



23 



Farm, stable and grounds, .... 


$8,000 


00 


Clothing", ....... 


500 


00 


Miscellaneous, 


14,000 


00 


For special appropriations i — 






One 150 kilowatt Westing'house dynamo, . 


$4,840 


00 


Replacing 1,900 feet sewer pipe, . . 


1,975 


00 


Increased fire protection, .... 


400 


00 


Resurfacing main road across sanatorium 






fTonnds 


1,400 


00 


^ew horse barn (of wood), . 


8,950 


00 


V.ril Q-po'PTYiprit', of OfwnPTnfpv ^hnn 


700 


00 


Woodworking machinery, .... 


835 


00 


Extension of western veranda on infirmary. 


965 


00 


To make over upper and lower ell with 






their annexes into an infirmary, 


865 


GO 


Furnishing, ...... 


390 


00 


Elevator for present infirmary, . 


1,500 


00 


Covering bridge between administration 






and central building with concrete. 


150 


00 




450 


00 



$184,000 00 



$23,420 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

AETHUR T. CABOT. 
ARTHUR DRI^TKWATER. 
GEORGE A. DUm. 
ALBERT C. GETCHELL. 
WILLIAM C. GODFREY. 
SYLVIA B. Kl^OWLTOK 
WILLIAM D. McEEE. 



24 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



NOETH READING STATE SANATOEIUM. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 
ERNEST B. EMERSON, M.D., . Superintendent and Physician. 
CARL C. McCORISON, M.D., Assistant Superintendent and Physician. 
ARTETUR P. JANES, M.D., .... Assistant Physician. 

H. JENNIE SANFORD, .... Superintendent of Nurses. 

MIRA B. ROSS, Matron. 

EDWARD W. PERRY, Chief Engineer. 

WILLIAM MARGESON, . Forentan. 




5 AoMIMISnrRATIOK. BTJ11.-DIMG • 

er^iNiNG Room BuiuoiHG. 
8 Open Pavilioh. 

:oWAT^iTo^Hl^ B LOC K • P L AN • NORT H • R E AD I N G • 5tAT B ■ 5aN ATO R I U M • 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



25 



EEPOKT OF THE SUPEKINTEISTDENT. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Ladies ajsd Geis^tlemeis^ : — I hereby submit the report of 
the I^orth Keading State Sanatorium for the year ending ^^'ov. 
30, 1910. 

The records show that during the year 508 patients have been 
treated and that 392 have been admitted. The daily average 
number of patients was 148. The largest daily census was 
161, and the smallest, 115. 

There have been admitted during the year 30 incipient, 126 
moderately advanced, 234 advanced cases, and 2 not tuber- 
culous. Many patients have been admitted apparently as a last 
resort and in a condition too weak to make the journey to the 
sanatorium. Friends and relatives, having been informed of 
the condition of the patient, oftentimes within a week or two 
have removed these cases, that they might die at home. Of 34 
patients remaining in the sanatorium one week or less, 22 were 
removed as stretcher cases, against advice. Probably some of 
these cases have been properly cared for in their own homes; 
others have undoubtedly gone back to homes where they could 
not receive proper care, and have become a menace to other 
members of the family and the community. It would seem as 
though such cases should not be admitted in the first place, or, 
what would be far better, that there should be some means of 
preventing them from going back into the community. That 
we are caring for many cases hitherto denied hospital treatment 
on account of the advanced stage of the disease is shown by our 
tables. There has been a daily average of 60 bed cases, ap- 
proximately 40 per cent, of the daily population. Of these, the 
majority have been in the last stages of tuberculosis, although 
a few have been bed cases temporarily on account of high tem- 
perature, rapid pulse or some minor disturbance, which has 
required rest in bed for varying periods of time. 



26 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Of the 392 cases admitted 317 were inside workers, 286 
were admitted from cities and towns having a population of 
25,000 or more. 

The average duration of residence in the sanatorium was 65 
days; the longest residence of any one person was 377 days, 
and the shortest, 1 day. 

Of the patients discharged during the year 138 have gained 
in weight, 66 have remained stationary, 57 have lost, 34 were 
not considered (duration of residence in the sanatorium being- 
less than one week) and 55 patients died. Five patients have 
been discharged apparently cured, 32 arrested, 94 improved, 
90 not improved, 55 died, 72 not considered (duration of stay 
being less than one month) and 2 not tuberculous. The average 
age was thirty-one years. One hundred and eighty-nine pa- 
tients were foreign-born; 119 patients were American-born but 
of foreign parentage. 

One hundred and sixty-six cases have been supported from 
private funds, 150 cases by cities and towns, 134 cases entirely 
by the State, and 58 private cases have later become either town 
or State charges. There were remaining ITovember 30, 47 pri- 
vate cases, 42 city or town cases, 30 State cases and 39 unknown 
cases. 

The total cost of maintenance for the year ending ]^ov. 30, 
1910, was $79,039.13 ; deducting $420.01 collected from miscel- 
laneous sources leaves a net amount expended for maintenance 
of $78,619.12. The average per capita cost per week is $10.18. 
There has been collected from private patients $8,592.27, and 
from cities and towns $8,179.57. Further details will be found 
in succeeding pages of this report. 

During the past few years it has become more generally rec- 
ognized that a certain amoimt of work, regulated and adapted 
to the strength of the patient, is a valuable aid in his efforts to 
regain health and strength. Its importance is not as yet fully 
appreciated. For many years we have been taught that the 
three essentials for the treatment and cure of tuberculosis were 
nourishing food, fresh air and rest. As a result many patients 
have been sent home with a layer of soft fat, apparently well, 
but in reality with little resistance to withstand the wear and 
tear of earning a livelihood which, as a rule, must be gained 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



27 



under the same conditions which brought them to the sana- 
torium in the first place. In order that benefit may be derived 
from work it must be prescribed and regulated by the physician 
and be under his daily supervision, as very few are able to judge 
its effect on themselves. Work, properly regulated, occupies 
the mind, hardens the patient and enables the physician to 
better judge his patient's real condition. As the idea of em- 
ployment for the sanatorium patient is new, more or less oppo- 
sition has been encountered. This, however, is being overcome 
slowly as the more intelligent and better class begin to realize 
the reason and importance of some occupation, and have oppor- 
tunity to observe the good results obtained in others. Although 
many are tmfit to perform even the lightest of duties. I feel 
very strongly that those who are, in the judgment of the physi- 
cians, able to do a little, even if not more than making a bed, 
should be required to do their allotment if they wish to contiaue 
our treatment, and that an effort shotild be made to bring the 
curable case to a point where nearly, if not quite, a full measure 
of work is rendered, otherwise we have not performed our full 
duty to those imder our charge. 

I>>IPEOVEME^'TS. 

Cement walks have been built connectiog all of the buildings. 

Waterpi-oof and sanitary floors have been laid in the lava- 
tories and toilets of the wards and pavilions, replacing the 
original wooden floors. 

A forty-gallon Badger fire extinguisher, mounted on wheels, 
and a motor-driven circular saw have been added to our equip- 
ment. 

A refrigerating machine, pipe and coils have been purchased 
and are to be installed during the coming winter. 

Work on the hennery and piggery has been started, and it is 
expected that the buildings will be completed and ready for use 
within a few weeks. 

The repairs and addition to the barn, authorized by chapter 
115. Acts of 1910, have been started, and it is hoped they will 
be completed before spring. 

Contracts have been placed for a new engine, generator and 
incinerator. 



28 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Staff. 

Dr. Harry S. Wagner, formerly of the Agnes Memorial Hos- 
pital, Denver, was appointed to the medical staff Dec. 19, 1909, 
and served most efficiently until he resigned, Feb. 20, 1910, to 
accept the position of first assistant physician at the Westfield 
State Sanatorium. Dr. Gordon B. Underwood was appointed 
second assistant physician, succeeding Dr. Wagner, Feb. 24, 
1910, and served until Aug. 21, 1910, when he resigned to ac- 
cept an appointment in the United States army. Dr. Arthur 
P. Janes, formerly of the State Infirmary at Tewksbury, was 
appointed second assistant physician, succeeding Dr. Under- 
wood, Aug. 22, 1910. 

Miss Jane Barker, superintendent of nurses and matron, re- 
signed Oct. 1, 1910, to accept a position at the Children's Hos- 
pital. Miss Barker came to us at a time when the position was 
most trying and difficult and when our organization was yet 
to be developed. Her services were of a high order of merit and 
deserve words only of commendation. Mrs. Jennie Sanford 
has been appointed superintendent of nurses, succeeding Miss 
Barker, and Miss Mira Ross has been appointed matron. 

Recommendations. 
Our present method of sewage disposal is unsatisfactory, un- 
sanitary and fails to meet the requirements of a modern es- 
tablishment. Plans and specifications have been prepared, in 
accordance with the law, for the construction of a filtration 
system, at an estimated expense of $3,800. I would recom- 
mend that the trustees bring this matter before the incoming 
Legislature. 

The sum of $79,7 Y 8 will be required for the maintenance of 
the sanatorium the ensuing year. 

Acknowledgments. 

I desire to acknowledge our obligations to the Rev. Father 
Lee, the Rev. Father Walsh, the Rev. Father Riordan and the 
Rev. Mr. Junkins, who have labored for the welfare of all. 

I desire to acknowledge our gratitude for the many gifts of 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUIVIENT — No. 77. 



29 



books, magazines and garments sent or brought to us, the donors 
of which oftentimes are unknown. 

I wish especially to thank the Winchester Branch of the 
i^'eedlework Guild of America for a box of garments, Mrs. H. 
Griggs of Xewton for a box of knitted helmets, and the King's 
Daughters of Andover for a Christmas box. 

I desire to acknowledge my gratitude to the officers, nurses 
and employees, who have sho^vn their loyalty during a year 
which has been especially hard for all. 

To you, the Board of Trustees, I wish to express my thanks 
and appreciation for your confidence and support. 

Eespectfully submitted, 



Nov. 30, 1910. 



EK^^EST B. EMEESO^sT, 

Superintendent. 



30 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSmiPTIVES. [Dec. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending ISTov. 30, 1910 : — 



Cash Account. 
Receipts. 

Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates: — 

Private, . . . . $8,592 27 

Cities and towns, . . 8,179 57 

$16,771 84 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 

Wages not caUed for, 19 70 

Sales: — 

Food, .... S3 36 

Miscellaneous, . . . 396 95 

400 31 



Miscellaneous receipts: — 

Interest on bank balances, .... 46 32 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance of 1909, $4,150 25 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30), 5,000 00 

Approved schedules of 1910, . . . 68,793 32 



$17,238 17 



77,943 57 

Special appropriations, ........ 3,793 64 



Total $98,975 38 

Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, $17,238 17 

Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance November schedule, 1909, . . 4,150 25 

Eleven months' schedules, 1910, . . . 68,793 32 

November advances, ..... 4,647 97 



$94,829 71 

Special appropriations : — 

Approved schedules, ........ 3,793 64 



Amount carried forward. 



$98,623 35 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



31 



Amount brought forward, ....... $98,623 35 

Balance Nov. 30, 1910: — 

In bank, S203 34 

In office, 148 69 

352 03 



Total $98,975 38 



Maintenance. 

Appropriation, .......... $80,620 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below), ....... 79,039 13 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . $1,580 87 



Analysis of Expenses. 



Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration, 
Medical service, . 
Ward service (male), . 
Ward service (female). 
Repairs and improvements. 
Farm, stable and grounds, 



Food : — 
Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 

Cheese. 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish. . 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 

Meats, 

Milk, 

Molasses and syrup. 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 

Vegetables, 

Sundries, 



Clothing and materials : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, 
Clothing, ..... 
Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 

Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc.. 

Brushes, brooms. 

Carpets, rugs, etc.. 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . 



$11,301 76 

4,477 29' 

1,647 75 

4,194 43 

1,169 59 

3.780 40 



$3,390 67 
350 20 
113 97 
72 06 
179 13 
89 54 
3,282 50 
140 00 
402 95 
1,611 34 
10,226 82 
4,784 81 
101 30 
1,050 40 
558 15 
1,669 79 
1,504 06 



$125 10 
297 00 
147 12 



$904 15 
111 21 
578 20 

1,112 83 



$26,571 22 



29,527 69 



569 22 



Amounts carried forward, 



$2,706 39 $56,668 13 



32 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, .... $2,706 39 

Furnishings — Con. 

Furniture and upholstery, .... 604 84 

Kitchen furnishings, ..... 164 05 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., . . 403 85 

Sundries, 143 45 



Heat, light and power: — 

Coal, S3,688 64 

Freight on coal, 640 67 

Oil, 80 50 

Sundries, ....... 8 92 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Doors, sashes, etc S336 10 

Electrical work and supplies, . . 321 39 

Hardware, 469 61 

Limiber, 454 32 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., . . . . 287 54 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, . . 334 25 

Roofing and materials, .... 23 37 

Sundries 1,726 20 



Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Blacksmith and supplies, .... $136 55 

Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, . . 417 96 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., . . . 409 49 

Hay, grain, etc., . . 221 33 

Harnesses and repairs, .... 151 39 

Horses 500 00 

Other live stock, ..... 59 00 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 204 63 

Sundries 90 23 



Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., .... $70 01 

Chapel services and entertainments, . . 429 17 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . . 794 53 

Ice 7 50 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 2,477 37 

Postage 167 20 

Printing and printing supplies, . . . 802 95 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 407 32 

Stationery and office supplies, . . . 333 23 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 365 32 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 216 56 

Tobacco, 1 50 

Cuspidor supplies, . . . . . 411 94 

Sundries 1,301 73 



$56,668 13 



4,022 58 



4,418 73 



3,952 78 



2,190 58 



7,786 33 



Total expenses for maintenance, 



$79,039 13 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 



33 



Special Appropriations. 
Appropriations for fiscal j'ear, ....... S10,S00 00 

Expended during the j-ear (see statement annexed), . . . 3,793 64 



Balance Nov. 30, 1910, S7,006 36 



RzsorRCES AXD Liabilities. 

Resources. 

Cash on hand S352 03 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money), 4,647 97 

Due from treasury- of Commonwealth account 

November, 1910, schedule, .... 5.245 81 

$10,245 81 

Liabilities. 

Schedule of November bills, $10,245 81 



ERXEST B. EMERSOX^, 

Treasurer. 



34 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



go 



T3 . 

gn 



O CO o o o 

O CX) iO o o 

O Tfi 1-H o o 
O (M 00 o o 

c<r 1— Tt-Tt— T 



rH lO 
»0 GO 
1— ( CO 



to 00 
1:^ 1—1 

T-H CO 



I I 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

o o o o o 
o o o o o 



CO 
CO 

CO 



o 
o 

o 
o 

00 

<s 



''sj^ 



CL, &, Ph 

d d d 1^ 

^^^^^ 

O O o 

T-H 1—1 1—1 i-H 1—4 

01 Oi Oi 



xn m m m xn 

■4-^ -(-2 -t-^ -(-3 -4-=> 
O O C3 O O 



bC c^ 



;h cj 



'ZSXJ a; § 



|2i i 
o 

m En 



a 

02 



P. 

CO 



m 



« 1 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 



35 



VALUATIOX. 



Real axd Persoxal Estate. 



Live stock, $1,560 00 

Carriages and agricultural implements, .... 1,510 00 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 9,575 00 

Beds and bedding, inmates' department, .... 4,291 49 

Other furniture, etc., inmates' department, . . . 6,215 30 

Personal property, superintendent's department, . . 4,695 52 

Ready-made clothing, 375 08 

Provisions and groceries, 3,926 70 

Drugs and medicines, 1,847 38 

Fuel, 2,790 00 

Library, 100 00 

Real estate, 77,375 00 



$114,261 47 

This is to certify that the foregoing list is a true schedule and appraisal of the 
personal property and real estate at the Xorth Reading State Sanatorium belong- 
ing to the Commonwealth Nov. 30, 1910. 

CHARLES H. LITTLEFIELD. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Lawkence, Dee. 3, 1910. 

Essex, ss. 

Then personally appeared the above-named Charles H. Littlefield and made 
oath that the foregoing schedule and appraisal is correct according to his best 
knowledge and beUef. 

DANIEL J. MURPHY, 

Justice of the Peace. 



36 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTR-ES. [Dec. 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS AXD EMPLOYEES. 







$2,500 


00 








T 400 


00 










00 


T^OnWpPT*P7- (t)PV TTlOTltVl^ 








00 


l \ZLX\Ji^±. <X\JL±\Z±. \ VJkZX. ±±±\Ji~L lxj. J J • • • • • 






^0 


00 


SlTnP7*1TlfpTlHpTlf f)'? 7Tn7*^P^ f DPT TnOTltll^ 








00 


frT^^irlnPltP TITIT^P^ /^TIPT' TTlOTltll^ 






35 


00 


Attendants (per month). ..... 


. $20 




to ^0 


00 








45 


00 


AQ^is;tant TnatTOTi ^ "dpt months 






25 


00 


Cliief ensrineer (p6r montli). .... 






100 


00 


Assistant engineers (per month). 






60 


00 


Fireman (per month), 






50 


00 


Chef (per month), 






75 


00 


Cooks (per month), 


. $22 


00 


to 35 


00 


Domestics (per month), 


. IS 


00 


to 20 


00 


General workers (per month), .... 


. 25 


00 


to 30 


00 


Laimdryman (per month). 






30 


00 


Laundi-esses (per month), 


. $22 


00 


to 30 


00 


Carpenter (per month), 






60 


00 


Farmer (per month), 






50 


00 


Stablemen (per month), 






30 


00 


Farm laborers (per month), .... 






30 


00 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 



37 



SPECIAL EEPOET. 



The following special report is prepared in accordance with 
a resolution of the National Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rection, adopted May 15, 1906: — 



Population. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of inmates present at beginning of fiscal year, 


60 


56 


116 


Number received during the vear 


199 


193 


392 


Number discharged or died during the vear, 


177 


173 


350 




82 


76 


158 


Daily average attendance {i.e., number of inmates actually 


76 


72 


148 


present) during the year. 








Average number of oflBcers and employees during the year, . 


30 


28 


58 


Expenditures. 








Current expenses : — 








1. Salaries and wages, 


$26,571 


22 




2. Clothing, 


569 


22 




3. Subsistence, 


33,946 42 




4. Ordinary repairs, .... 


3,952 


78 




5. Office, domestic and outdoor ex- 








penses, 


13,999 49 




Total, 




$79,039 13 


Extraordinaiy expenses : — 








1. Additional furnishings and equip- 










$2,175 14 




2. Hennery, piggery, etc., . 


1,61S 50 




Total 




3,793 64 



Grand total, 



$S2,S32 77 



38 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Notes on current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages should include salaries of trustees or direc- 

tors, if any. 

2. Clothing includes shoes, and also materials for clothing and 

shoes if they are manufactured in the institution. 

3. Ordinarj^ repairs include all of those which simply maintain 

the buildings in condition, without adding to them. Any re- 
pairs which are of the nature of additions should be classed 
with " permanent improvements." 

4. This item includes everything not otherwise provided for, e.g., 

furniture, bedding, laundry supplies, medicines, engineer's 
supplies, postage, freight, library, etc. 
Executive head (superintendent and resident physician) : Erxest B. 
Emersox. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 77. 



39 



STATISTICAL TABLES, 



Table 1. — Admissions and Discharges. 



Males. 



Females. Totals. 



Patients in sanatorium Dec. 1, 1909, 



Number of patients admitted Dec. 1, 1909, to Xov. 30, 1910, 
inclusive. 

Number discharged Dec. 1, 1909, to Nov. 30, 1910, inclusive. 
Number of deaths (included in preceding item), . 
Number remaining in sanatorium Nov. 30, 1910, . 
Daily average number of patients, 



60 


56 


116 


199 


193 


392 


177 


173 


350 


32 


23 


55 


82 


76 


15S 


76.01 


72.06 


148.07 



Table 2. — Civil Condition of Palients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Married, 


93 


110 


203 




102 


72 


174 




4 


10 


14 


Divorced, 




1 




Totals 


199 


193 


392 



Table 3. — Age of Patients admitted. 






Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1 to 14 years, . 




3 


4 


7 


14 to 20 years, . 




14 


27 


41 


20 to 30 years, . 




70 


80 


150 


30 to 40 years, . 




&4 


55 


119 


40 to 50 years, . 




29 


23 


52 


Over 50 years, . 




19 


4 


23 


Tot.Hls, 




199 


193 


392 



40 HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTRTS. [Dec. 



Table 4. — Nativity and Parentage of Patients admitted. 





M.VLES. j 


Females. 


Totals. 


PL-\CES OF NATIVITY. 


c 


o 


u 

61 


C3 




o 










.2 


JS 


x: 
o 


.2 


j3 


o 


.2 


1 


C 






Em 






Em 




Ph 


Em 
























^^iSS£lcllll56ttS, . ... 


97 


25 


22 


67 


19 


19 


164 


44 


41 




9 


18 


17 


11 


10 


9 


20 


28 


26 


OtKcr States 


9 


11 


8 


10 


7 


9 


19 


18 


17 


Totsl D3tiv6, .... 


115 


54 


47 


88 


36 


37 


203 


90 


84 


Other countries: — 






















3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


5 


5 


5 




2 


2 


2 




2 


1 


3 


4 


3 
















1 










1 


1 








1 


1 






19 


22 


25 


31 


40 


41 


50 


62 


66 


England 




9 


6 


7 


6 


7 


11 


15 


13 






2 


1 








1 


2 








1 








1 


2 


2 








8 


8 


1 


4 


3 


3 


12 


11 


Greece 






1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


3 


3 




22 


65 


71 


29 


60 


65 


51 


125 


136 


Italy 




4 


4 


4 


5 


5 


8 


g 


9 






1 


1 








1 




1 


Norway, 




1 


1 




1 




1 


2 




Russia 


17 


19 


19 


16 


17 


16 


33 


36 


35 






3 






2 






5 


1 






2 


2 


10 


10 


10 


11 


12 


12 






1 


1 


1 




1 


2 


2 


2 


Wales 














1 






Total foreign, .... 


83 


145 


146 


105 


153 


155 


188 


298 


301 




1 












1 












6 




4 


1 




4 


7 


Totals, 


199 


199 


199 


193 


193 


193 


392 


392 


392 





19i0.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 41 



Table 5. — Residence of Patients admitted. 



Place. 


Number. 


Place. 


Number. 


Adams, 


1 


Newburyport, .... 


2 




1 


Newton, ..... 


9 




4 




1 




2 






Attleborough, .... 
















Boston 


90 








3 




2 




2 




^ 




10 




12 




10 




1 


Concord, 


^ 


Saugus, 


3 




2 




17 




15 




1 




5 




1 




1 


Stoneham, 


5 




6 




2 


-...^.i^ ; 1 1 


27 


Taunton, ..... 


^ 


TT , , ,1 T>_^1, 


1 


Topsfield, 


1 




1 




7 




25 


Walpole, 


1 




1 




9 






Watertown, 


3 


T r^nrnll 


16 




2 


Lynn, ...... 


33 




1 




15 




1 




1 


Whitman, 


1 


Marblehead 


1 


Wilmington 


1 


Marlborough, .... 


1 


Winchester, 


i 


Medford, 


5 


Winthrop, 


4 


Melrose 


5 


Woburn, 


3 


Mendon, .... 




Worcester, 


1 


Methuen, 




Total 


392 


Milton, 


1 







42 HOSPITALS FOR 



CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Table 6. — Occupations. 



1 Males. 


Females. 




Males. 

1 


Females. 








Lather, .... 


1 




xSalcer, .... 


1 




Laundress, 




2 


B&rber, .... 


J 




Letter carrier. 






6&rt6ii(i6rf . . 






Linotypist, 


1 




£elt maker, 


1 
1 




Machinist, 


10 




Slacksmith, 






Metal polisher. 


1 




Bookbinder, 




2 


Mill operative. 


8 


12 


Bookkeeper, 


1 

X 


2 


Milliner, .... 




1 




1 




Music teacher, 


1 




Brakeman, 


J 




Newsboy, 






Bricklayer, 






No work, 


2 


5 


Buffer, .... 


2 




Nurse, trained. 






Butler, . . • • 






Nursemaid, 




2 


Cabinet maker, , . 


2 




Painter, .... 


4 




Cap maker^ 






Pattern maker. 


2 




Carpenter, . 


g 




Pedler, .... 


2 




Cashier, .... 


ji 


1 


Photographer, . 


1 




Cliambermaid, . 




1 


Physician, 


1 




Cliauffeur, 






Plumber, 


3 




Civil engineer, . . 


\ 




Porter, .... 


1 




oierK, .... 


10 


4 


Printer, .... 


3 




Commission agent. 


J 




Rigger, .... 


1 




Currier, .... 


2 




Salesman, 


3 




Domestic, 




22 


Seamstress, 




3 


Dyer, .... 


1 
1 




Section hand. 


2 




Electrician, 


5 




Shipper, . ' . 


4 




Engineer, 


2 




Shoe factory operative, . 


31 


6 


Errand boy. 






Shop girl, 




3 


Farmer, .... 






Silver polisher. 


1 




Fish, skinner, . 






Stenographei , 


1 


2 


Gardener, 


X 




Street car conductor. 


4 




Glazier, .... 


2 




Student, .... 


6 


11 


Hatter, .... 


1 




Tailor 


7 


1 


Housewife, 




103 


Teamster, 


8 




Insurance agent. 


1 




Telephone operator. 




1 


Iron moulder. 


1 




Tinsmith, 


1 




Jeweler 


1 


1 


Tool grinder, . 


1 




Junk dealer, . 






Waiter, . . 


1 


4 


Laborer, .... 


24 




Watchmaker, . 


1 


2 


Lamp maker, . 


1 




Totals, 


199 


193 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIExXT — No. 77. 43 



Table 7. — Condition on Admission. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




17 


13 


30 


Moderatelj- advanced, 


64 


62 


126 




118 


116 


234 


Non-tubercular 




2 


2 


Totals 


199 


193 


392 


Table S. — C onditioi on Di 


sclicifge. 








Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Apparently cured, 


3 


2 


5 


Arrested 


19 


13 


32 


Improved 


43 


51 


94 


Progressive 


41 


49 


90 


Died, 


32 


23 


55 


Not considered (duration of stay less than one month). 


39 


33 


72 


Non-tubercular, 




2 





Totals 


177 


173 


350 



Table 9.— Deaths. 



Duration- of Disease. 


Length of Residence ts 

S.AXATOKIUM. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Under 1 month, 








11 


4 


15 


1 to 2 months. 








8 


9 


17 


2 to 3 months, 








2 




3 


3 to 4 months. 








5 




6 


4 to 5 months. 








2 




3 


5 to 6 months. 








2 


3 


5 


6 to 7 months. 








1 






7 to 8 months, 










2 


2 


8 to 9 months. 










1 




9 to 10 months. 


- 


- 






1 


2 


10 to 12 months. 














12 to 18 months. 


5 


6 


11 








18 to 24 months. 




4 


9 








Over 2 years, .... 


20 


11 


31 








Not known, .... 


2 


1 


3 








Totals, .... 


32 


23 


55 


32 


23 


55 



44 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTR^S. [Dec. 

Table 10. — Cause of Death. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Phthisis 


32 


22 


54 






1 


1 


Totals 


32 


23 


55 




Lauhdpv 



3 r 
Block • Pl^an - Lakevi • STAm - Sahato Ri UM ^ 

• Mass • 



HOUSH: 

Power House 

WATE.RTOWER 

Kens ■ Vv^aj^p • B uildiNG 
Apmikistpation Bujlpjng 
Dining Room Building 

V/OMEKS WARP BUILDIHG 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



45 



LAKEYILLE STATE SANATOKIUM. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

SUMNER COOLIDGE, M.D., Superintendent. 

S. W. CORNISH, M.D., Physician. 

JOHN J. STACK, M.D., Physician. 



ELLA M. KELLEY, . 
LESTON P. GIDDINGS, 
THOMAS SAMPSON, 



Matron. 
Steward. 
Farm Foreman. 



46 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



EEPORT OF THE SUPEEII^TEI^DEisTT. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

This sanatoriuin was opened by proclamation of His Ex- 
cellency Governor Draper on Jan. 6, 1910, at which time only 
the men's ward and administration building were ready for 
occupancy. 

The first male patient was admitted Jan. 19, 1910. The 
women's ward was ready for patients about a month later, and 
the first female patient was admitted February 22. 

Opening as we did in midwinter, it was thought best to fill 
the beds slowly in order the better to insure the comfort of the 
patients, so we did not approach our full capacity till June. 
Since that time we have maintained a daily average of 151+ 
patients. 

On the whole, the admissions of the later months of the year 
show a slightly larger proportion of early cases than was the 
case in the early months. 

There is a strong prejudice against allowing patients to die 
away from their families, as a result of which several have been 
removed from the sanatorium, against advice, a few days before 
death. 

Eesideitce. 

The geographical distribution of cases admitted shows that 
64 towns are represented, of which Boston sent us 36 per cent, 
of all cases, ITew Bedford 9 per cent., Brockton 7 per cent, and 
Fall Eiver 4 per cent. 

Results. 

To estimate the results of our first year's treatment is diffi- 
cult. While a considerable proportion of our cases have re- 
mained in the sanatorium long enough to show definite results, 

a great many, including many hopeful cases, have become impa- 

i 

\ 



1910.]- PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 77. 



47 



tient, or dissatisfied, or unruly, and have moved on without 
receiving any appreciable benefit from their stay. This is 
probably due to the fact that many of our cases do not come to 
us of their own free will and accord, but, to a certain extent, 
are coerced by boards of health, societies or friends. 

Of 229 patients discharged, 24 stayed one week or less. Of 
the remaining 205 the number of those who gained weight was 
114, — 67 men and 47 women. The average gain of the men 
was 8.6 pounds and of the women 7.8 pounds. The greatest 
gain of a man was 60 pounds and of a woman 36 pounds. There 
were 61 who lost weight, — 35 men and 26 women. 

The average stay of these cases was 80 days. Our records 
show that 61.6 per cent, of all cases considered were improved 
and 38.4 per cent, not improved. 

The discharge of a few cases apparently cured or arrested 
has been a source of great encouragement to the other patients. 

Of 150 patients who on ISTovember 30 had been in the sana- 
torium one week or more, 68 women and 60 men gained, the 
women averaging 13.6 pounds, the men 9^ pounds. Of the 
68 women who gained, 52, who had been with us three months 
or more, made an average gain of 15.7 pounds, while the aver- 
age gain of those who remained in the sanatorium six months 
or more was 16.9 pounds, and 8 women who have remained 
nine months or more averaged 17.7 pounds each. It is to be 
noted that the average stay of patients remaining in the sana- 
torium jN'ovember 30 was 141 days. 

Classificatiox. 
Of 386 cases admitted, the sanatorium classification of 162 
differed from the classification before admission. Of these, 31 
favored the patient, 119 were less favorable to the patient and 
12 entered without previous classification. 

Water Supply. 
Although many of the wells in this vicinity have been dry for 
several months, the water supply of the sanatorium has been 
adequate for the actual necessities of the institution, and the 



48 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



quality of the water is unexcelled in this State; but the wells 
have been drawn upon to their full capacity, showing the need 
of additional wells in the near future. 

Sewage Disposal. 
Up to the present time the sewage has been disposed of very 
satisfactorily underground by subsoil tiling, which serves the 
additional purpose of fertilizing the land. There is need of an 
extension of the system to allow the use of the several sections 
intermittently. A small expenditure at this time will provide 
ample capacity for several years. 

UaeMj Stable axd Grounds. 

Our records show what may seem to be an excessive expendi- 
ture in this department. When it was found that we should 
not need all of our maintenance appropriation in the early 
months of the year, because of the small number of patients, 
it was thought best to use the money available in improving the 
grounds, buildings and equipment. To this end an effort was 
made to complete, if possible, the most difficult part of the land- 
scaping, i.e.^ the building of an avenue and walks, the grading 
and planting immediately about the buildings, and the exten- 
sion of the sewerage system as found necessary. This work was 
difficult and expensive; in fact, the greater part of the money 
spent in this department was spent for this kind of work, the 
actual work of producing about $1,100 worth of farm produce 
being merely incidental. 

The vegetable garden was very successful and greatly appre- 
ciated by the patients ; in fact, few vegetables except potatoes 
were bought during the summer months. 

About 3 acres of brush land have been cleared and ploughed 
and about 1% acres have been set with apples, pears and other 
small fruits. 

Eepaies axd Improve meis'ts. 
A considerable expenditure has been made in repairs and im- 
provenlents, but it is believed that the efficiency of the whole 
plant has been materially increased thereby. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



49 



Special Appropriations. 
All tlie new work for which special appropriations were made 
is progressing satisfactorily. The new barn is more than half 
completed; the duplicate generating set is erected and almost 
ready for use; the refrigerating engine is erected and the am- 
monia piping has been commenced; a poultry house has been 
completed and is now occupied by 400 hens; a complete outfit 
of screens was purchased early in the summer; an incinerator 
is almost completed; the furniture and equipment of the insti- 
tution have been gTeatly improved by the special appropriation 
for that purpose. 

I-MPROVEMEXTS DESIRED. 

The greatest need of the institution is a building for recrea- 
tion and occupation of patients. At present the patients are 
huddled into the wards in stormy weather because we have no 
other shelter for them. A building is needed which shall con- 
tain an assembly room, several workshops and a laboratory. 

In addition to the extension of our sewage disposal, as men- 
tioned above, there is urgent need of a fence about the sana- 
torium grounds. Our neighbors rightly object to the trespassing 
of our patients, and we likewise object to the trespassing of our 
neighbors and their animals, and especially to undesirable vis- 
itors, who frequently visit patients clandestinely. 

In our last annual report a request was made for $1,800 for 
a hennery. Eight hundred dollars was appropriated on the 
ground that we could make a beginning with that amount. This 
has been done, but the plant is not complete and cannot be 
handled profitably in its present condition. 

The capacity of our water plant should be increased without 
delay by the addition of five new wells. 

Medical Service. 
Dr. John E. Runnells, first assistant at the opening of the 
sanatorium, resigned June 23 to accept the position of superin- 
tendent of the Xew Hampshire State Sanatorium. His service 
during those early months of organization was most faithful 



50 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



and efficient. He was succeeded by Dr. Solon W. Cornish, A.B., 
Dartmouth, M.D., Harvard, 1908. Dr. Harold F. Parker 
served as second assistant from March 26 to August 31, when 
he was succeeded by Dr. John J. Stack, A.M., Holy Cross, 
M.D., Harvard, 1907. 

Miss Adele L. Richardson, supervisor of nurses since the 
opening of the sanatorium, resigned in October to take up post- 
graduate work. She performed her very difficult task with 
loyalty to the institution and with a zeal limited only by her 
physical strength. Her place has not yet been filled. 

I wish to express my appreciation of the unfailing support 
and encouragement of your Board, and of the loyalty of heads 
of departments and their subordinates, without which no insti- 
tution can succeed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SUMXER COOLIDGE, 

Superintendent. 



Nov. 30, 1910. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 



51 



REPOKT OF THE TEEASURER. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending Xov. 30, 1910 : — 



Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates: — 
Private, 

Cities and towns, 

Sales: — 
Food. 

Clothing and materials, 
Miscellaneous. 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Pigs and hogs. 
Vegetables, 
Sundries, 

Miscellaneous receipts: — 

Interest on bank balances, 
Simdries, 



Cash Accotrvr. 
Receipts. 



$5,344 12 
5,678 59 



$2 75 
34 45 
ISl 11 



832 00 
28 85 
80 



S60 65 
90 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Advance money (amoimt on hand Novem- 
ber 30) 

Approved schedules of 1910, 

Special appropriations, , . . . . 

Total 

Payments. 

To treasurj- of Commonwealth, institution receipts, 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Eleven months' schedules, 1910, 

November advances, . 



$11,022 71 



218 31 



61 65 



61 55 



$5,000 00 
66.472 89 



$11,364 22 

66.472 89 
2,952 08 



$11,364 22 



71.472 89 
11,667 08 

$94,504 19 



$80,789 19 



Amount carried forward. 



$80,789 19 



52 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward 880,789 19 

Special appropriations : — 

Approved schedules, ........ 11,667 08 

Balance Nov. 30, 1910: — 

In bank $1,809 85 

In office, 238 07 

2,047 92 

Total $94,504 19 

Maintenance. 

Appropriation, $75,990 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below), ....... 75,975 19 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 



$14 81 



Analysis of Expenses. 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 

General administration, .... $12,405 23 

Medical service, 3,664 30 

Ward service (male), 830 86 

Ward service (female), .... 2,852 11 

Repairs and improvements, .... 2,419 59 

Farm, stable and grounds, .... 5,011 12 

Food: — 

Butter, $1,656 54 

Butterine 62 85 

Beans, 82 75 

Bread and crackers, ..... 71 76 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc., .... 239 03 

Cheese, 14 67 

Eggs, 2,001 93 

Flour 637 27 

Fish, 538 53 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 418 95 

Meats, 6,232 06 

MHk, 5,003 91 

Molasses and syrup, ..... 24 26 

Sugar 823 32 

Tea, coffee, broma and cocoa, . . . 444 25 

Vegetables, 655 72 

Sundries, 492 43 

Clothing and materials : — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, .... $43 47 

Clothing, 313 33 

Dry goods for clothing and smaU wares, . 57 41 

Furnishing goods, ..... 5 75 

Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . . . $1,584 43 

Brushes, brooms, . . . . . 178 30 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 624 89 



$27,183 21 



19,400 23 



419 96 



Amounts carried forward, 



$2,387 62 $47,003 40 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCmiENT — No. 77. 



53 



Amounts brought forward. 

Furnishings — Con. 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . 
Furniture and upholstery. 
Kitchen furnishings. ... 
Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 
Sundries, ...... 

Heat, light and power: — 

Coal, 

Freight on coal, . . . . . 

on, 

Sundries, ...... 

Repairs and improvements : — 

Brick, 

Cement, lime and plaster, 
Doors, sashes, etc., . . . , 
Electrical work and supplies. 
Hardware, ...... 

Lumber, ...... 

Machinery, etc., . . . . . 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., . . . . 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 

Roofing and materials. 

Sundries, ...... 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies. 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs. 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc.. 
Hay, grain, etc., . . . . . 

Harnesses and repairs. 

Horses, ...... 

Cows, ...... 

Other live stock, . . . . . 

Rent, 

Tools, farm machines, etc., . 

Sundries, ...... 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., 
Chapel services and entertainments. 
Freight, expressage and transportation, . 
Funeral expenses, . . . . 

Hose, etc., ...... 

Ice, ....... 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra), 
Postage, ...... 

Printing and printing supplies. 
Soap and laundry supplies, . 
Stationery and oflBce supplies. 



S2,387 62 S47,003 40 



830 76 
1,042 64 

989 47 

129 32 
330 74 

5,710 55 

$4,658 37 

42 00 

62 63 
116 04 
4,879 04 

S75 24 

707 32 

295 94 
397 76 
280 24 

1,055 45 

101 30 
445 99 

1,473 54 
61 59 
996 99 
5,891 36 

S151 44 
894 36 
950 92 
1,120 55 
92 51 
875 00 
190 00 
237 00 
225 00 
231 06 
367 07 
5,334 91 

S20 05 

130 00 

831 80 
110 00 
246 06 
552 90 

2,603 78 
14 84 

102 00 

296 81 
664 48 
375 20 



Amounts carried forward, 



$5,947 92 



$68,819 26 



54 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, .... $5,947 92 S68,819 26 

Miscellaneous — Con. 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 287 19 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 230 56 

Tobacco, 3 50 

Sundries, 686 76 

7,155 93 



Total expenses for maintenance, ..... $75,975 19 

Special Appeopriations. 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... $21,350 00 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed) , $11,667 08 
Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . 10 

11,667 18 



Balance Nov. 30, 1910, $9,682 82 

Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand $2,047 92 

Novembercash vouchers (paid from advance money), 2,952 08 

Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 

November, 1910, schedule 4,502 30 

$9,502 30 



Liabilities. 

Schedule of November bills, 



$4,502 30 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



55 



I 



a e>H 
Hi 



05 (N 


CO O 00 




CD 05 


05 --^ <M 


00 


lO O 


CO (M 


<M 


O 


CO o 


00 


00 CO 


I— 1 T— 1 


CO 















T-H 00 

CO o 
1-1 00 



O <M 
O 05 

CO 05 I> 
^ 05 05 
(M 05 CO 



T-H 00 

CO o 

i-H 00 



O 
O Oi 

CO o 

i-H Oi C5 

(M Oi CO 



o o o 
o o o 

o o o 
LO o o 
CO o lo 



00 00 OO 00 00 



Qh Qh 

o c;> o o 



o 

01 Oi 



o o o 

05 05 05 



m m m 
-f^ 

o CP o 



;3 
o 

So 



g a 

CP o 



0) 



a 

CO 



o 

o 
o 



02 



1 



.1 

C3 

^ I 



56 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



VALUATION 



Real estate : — 

Land, number of acres, 75, valuation, . . . $4,125 00 
Buildings and water plant, valuation, . . . 93,875 00 



Total real estate valuation, $98,000 00 

Personal estate : — 

Live stock on farm, 3,162 00 

Produce of farm on hand, 106 50 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . . 2,047 83 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, .... 1,625 00 
Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . . 4,436 00 
Other furniture in inmates' department, . . . 1,702 63 
Personal property of State in superintendent's de- 
partment, 3,598 54 

Ready-made clothing, 132 09 

Provisions and groceries, 730 23 

Drugs and medicines, 100 00 

Fuel, 860 00 

Other supplies undistributed, 1,225 38 



Total personal estate valuation, .... $19,726 20 
Total valuation, $117,726 20 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 57 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS AXD EMPLOYEES. 



Superintendent and treasurer (per annum), . . $2,500 00 

Physician (per annum), 1,200 00 

Physician (per annum), 720 00 

Matron (per annum), 720 00 

Steward (per annum), 1,200 00 

Steward's assistant (per month), .... 45 00 

Chief engineer (per month), 75 00 

OflBce assistant (per month), 18 00 

Farmer (per month), $40 00 to 60 00 

Supen'isor (per month), 45 00 

Nurses (per month), $25 00 to 35 00 

Attendants (per month), 18 00 to 25 00 

Orderlies (per month), 20 00 to 30 00 

Cook (per month), 50 00 to 60 00 

Assistant cook (per month), 40 00 to 50 00 

Baker (per month), 40 00 to 50 00 

Storeroom helper (per month), 25 00 to 35 00 

Engineers (per month), 50 00 to 60 00 

Fireman (per month), 40 00 

Laundry help, male and female (per month), . . $20 00 to 35 00 

Kitchen help (per month), 18 00 to 25 00 

Waiters, male and female (per month), . . . 18 00 to 20 00 

Expressman (per month), 30 00 

Farm help (per month), 25 00 

Laborers (per day) (without living), .... 1 80 

Carpenter (per day) (without living), ... 3 28 

Carpenter (per month), 55 00 

Matron's assistant (per month), 25 00 

Ward maids (per month), 18 00 

General helpers (per month), $18 00 to 35 00 



oS 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTRTS. [Dec. 



SPECIAL REPOET. 



The following report is prepared in accordance with a reso- 
lution of the Xational Conference of Charities and Corrections, 
adopted May 15. 1906: — 



Population. 





Alales. 


Females 
xemaies. 


Totals. 


dumber of patients present at beginning of fiscal year, 








Number received during the year, 


202 


184 


386 


Xiimber discharged or died during the year, 


122 


107 


229 


Number at end of the fiscal year, 


80 


" 


157 


Daily average attendance (i.e., number of inmates actiially 


67 


57 


124 


present ) durine the vear. 








Average nimiber of officers and employees during the time 


35 


23 


58 


institution was full (June 1 to November 30). 








Experiditures. 








Current expenses : — 








1. Salaries and wages, 


$27,183 


21 






419 


96 




3. Subsistence, 


19,400 


23 




4. Ordinary repairs and improvements. 


5,891 


36 




5. Office, domestic, and out-doors ex- 










23,080 


43 








— $7. 


5.975 19 


Extraordinary expenses: — 








1. New buildings, land, etc., 


$1,594 


31 




2. Permanent improvements to existing 








buildings and grounds. 


10,072 


77 





Total, 11.667 08 



Grand total, 



$87,642 27 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



59 



Summary of Current Expenses. 

Total expenditures, $87,642 27 

Deducting extraordinary expenses, 11,667 08 

$75,975 19 

Deducting amount of sales, 341 51 



$75,633 68 



Dividing this amount by the daily average number of patients. 124, 
gives a cost for the year January 5 to November 30 of $609.95, 
equivalent to an average weekly net cost of $12.95. 



60 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSmiPTIVES. [Dec. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Table 1. — Admissions and Discharges. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients admitted, Jan. 19 to Nov. 30, 1910, in- 


202 


184 


386 


clusive. 








Number discharged, Jan. 19 to Nov. 30, 1910, inclusive. 


122 


107 


229 


Number of deaths (included in preceding items). 


17 


11 


28 


Number remaining in sanatorium Nov. 30, 1910, . 


80 


77 


157 


Dailj^ average number of patients, 


67 


57 


124 


Daily average number of bed patients, June 1 to Nov. 30, 1910, 


20 


21 


41 



Table 2. — Civil Condition of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




91 


90 


181 


Single, 


105 


82 


187 




7 


9 


16 














2 


2 




203 


183 


386 



Table 3. — Age of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1 to 14 years, 


1 


2 


3 




26 


23 


49 


20 to 30 years, 


63 


74 


137 


30 to 40 years 


58 


62 


120 




36 


20 


56 




15 


6 


21 




199 


187 


386 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 61 



Table 4. — Nativity and Parentage of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


PLACES OF NATIVITY. 


g 


© 


i 


a 




V 


1 


o 


© 




Is 




oin 




2 
t 


nth 






oth 






1 










1 






United States: — 




















Massachusetts, .... 


79 


15 


15 


58 


16 


17 


137 


31 


32 


Other New England States, . 


10 


9 


7 


9 


6 


9 


19 


15 


16 


Other States 


5 


2 


5 


12 


5 


4 


17 


7 


9 


Total native, .... 


94 


26 


27 


79 


27 


30 


173 


53 


57 


Other countries: — 




















Canada, ...... 


24 


24 


23 


26 


25 


30 


50 


49 


53 


Corea, ...... 


_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 




_ 


_ 




Denmark, ..... 
















1 




England, ...... 


11 


8 


11 


4 


7 


8 


15 


15 


19 


Finland, ...... 


3 




1 


2 


1 


1 


5 


2 


2 


France, ...... 




_ 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Germany, ..... 




3 


2 


1 


4 


2 


2 


7 


4 


Ireland, ...... 


21 


61 


58 


32 


59 


53 


53 


120 


111 


Italy, ...... 


3 


3 


3 


7 


4 


4 


10 


7 


7 


Norway, ...... 


_ 


1 




_ 


_ 




_ 


1 


1 


Poland, ...... 








3 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


Portugal, ...... 


2 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


4 


3 


2 


Roumania, ..... 


1 


_ 
















Russia, ...... 


27 


23 


24 


16 


10 


9 


43 


33 


33 


Scotland, ...... 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


1 


2 


5 


3 


Sweden, ...... 


7 


8 


8 


4 


6 


5 


11 


14 


13 


Switzerland 


2 












2 






Turkey, 


3 


3 


3 


1 






4 


3 


3 


Wales 








1 






1 






Western Islands, .... 


1 


2 


1 




4 


2 


2 


6 


3 


Total foreign, .... 


107 


141 


140 


102 


130 


121 


209 


271 


261 


Unknown, 


1 


35 


35 


3 


27 


33 


4 


62 


68 


Totals 


202 


202 


202 


184 


184 


184 


386 


386 


386 



62 HOSPITALS FOR CONSTOIPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 5. — Residence of Patients admitted. 



Place. 


Number. 


4 Place. 


Number. 


Arlington, ..... 





IVililOIl, ...... 


i 


Ashland, ..... 




Nantucket, ..... 


1 


Attleborough, .... 


10 


New Bedford, .... 


34 


Blackstone, ..... 




Newbury port, .... 


1 


Boston, •«•... 


141 


Newi;oii, ..... 




Bournedale, ..... 




Norwood, ..... 


e 



Bridgewater, ..... 




North. Attleborough, 


Q 

o 


Brockton, ..... 


07 


v-'aK r>iuns, ..... 


1 


Brookline, ..... 




r^ittsnela, ..... 




Canton, ...... 




Plymouth, . • • . . 


A 

4 


i^ambnage, ..... 




Quincy, ...... 


12 


Chelsea, ...... 




Paiidolph, ..... 




uaiion, ...... 




Raynham, ..... 




Dedham, ..... 




I^oclcland, ..... 


2 


X)ennis, 




XV U-tXallU., ..... 


2 


Dudley, ..... 




Scituate, ..... 




Easton, ...... 


2 


Somerville, ..... 


a 
o 


HiVerexr, • . . . . . 




ouuLii. j-vidxuticc;, . . ■ • 




rail rtiver, ..... 


ifi 

10 


Springfield, ..... 




Fitchburg, ..... 




S n <T Vi '^ A n 

LiJ U.gJJ.t\iXl, ..... 


3 


Framingham, .... 




'X'auntou, « . . • . 


14 


Gardner, ..... 


1 


Xruro, ...... 


J. 


Hanover, ..... 




Walpole, ..... 


I 


Harding, ..... 


1 
1 


Walt ham, ..... 


K 

o 


Haverhill, ..... 




T( LCI tAJ VV U., . . • . ■ 


1 


Holyoke, ..... 




Wareham, . . • . • 


2 


Hyde Park, 


8 


Westfield 




Lawrence, 


2 


Whitman, . . . . 


5 


Lynn 


4 


Woburn, 


1 


Medford, 


2 


Woods Hole, 


1 


Med way, 


1 


Worcester, 


3 


Melrose, 


7 


Total, 


386 


Middleborough, .... 


3 







1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 63 



Table 6. — Occupations. 





Males. 


Females. 




Males. 


Females. 


Attendant, 


- 


1 


Jeweler, .... 


7 


1 


Baker 


1 


- 


Laborer, .... 


16 


- 


Barber, .... 




1 


Laundress, 


- 


2 


Blacksmith, . 


3 


- 


Longshoreman, 


1 


- 


Bookkeeper, . 


2 


- 


Machinist, 


8 


- 


Bookbinder, , 




2 


Marble cutter, 


1 


- 


Brakeman, 


1 


- 


Mechanic, 


1 


- 


Candy factory, 


- 


3 


Milliner, .... 


- 


2 


Card room, 


1 


- 


Mill operative. 


19 


8 


Carpenter, 


5 


- 


Missionary, 


- 


2 


Carriage shop, 


1 


- 


Nurse, .... 


- 


2 


Chair maker, . 


1 


- 


Painter 


8 


- 


Charwoman, . 


- 


1 


Paperworker, . 




- 


Chemical worker, . 


1 


- 


Pedler, .... 


1 


- 


Choreman, 


2 


- 


Photographer, 


1 


- 


Cigar stripper, 


- 


1 


Pianist, .... 


- 


1 


Clerk, .... 


15 


6 


Plumber, 


1 


- 


Color mixer, . 




- 


Printer, .... 


1 




Compositor, . 


- 


1 


Reporter, 


1 


- 


Designer, 




- 


Roofer, .... 


1 


- 


Domestic, 


5 


21 


Rubber worker, 


3 


- 


Dressmaker, . 


- 


2 


Sailor, .... 


3 


- 


Dry goods buyer, . 


1 


- 


Sculptor, 


1 


- 


Electrician, 


3 


- 


Seamstress, 


- 


2 


Enameler, 


1 


- 


Shoemaker, 


7 


- 


Engineer, 


2 


- 


Shoeworker, . 


12 


3 


Errand boy, . 


1 


- 


Silversmith, . 


2 


- 


Farmer 




- 


Stage mechanic, 


1 


- 


Florist, .... 


1 


- 


Steam fitter, . 


2 


- 


Foundry, 


1 




Stonecutter, . 


3 




Glass blower, . 


2 




Stone mason, . 






Glass engraver. 






Student, 


6 


9 


Hatter 


1 




Switchman, . 


1 




Hostler, .... 






Tailor 


13 




Housewife, 




105 


Teamster, 


6 




Inspector paper tubes, . 






Telephone operator, 




1 


Ironworker, 


2 




Telegraph operator. 


1 





64 HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTRTS. [Dec. 



Table 6. — Occupations — Concluded. 





Males. 


Females. 




j Males. 


Females. 


Trunk maker, 
Vocalist, .... 
Woodworker, . 
Wool sorter, 


1 

: 

1 


; 1 


Treer 

L'nknovrn, 
Totals, 


1 
6 


6 


202 


j 184 


Table 7. - 


— Condition on Discharge. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Per Cent. 


Apparently cured, 

Arrested, 

Improved, 

Unimproved. . 


5 
5 

42 

32 


2 
44 
29 


5 
7 
S6 
61 


3.14 
4.40 
54.09 
38.37 


S4 


75 


159 





Average stay of discharged patients, 80 days. 



Table 8. — Classification of Discharges. 





Males. 


Females 


Totals. 


Total niimber discharged, 


121 


105 




229 




17 


11 




2S 




104 


97 




201 




20 


22 




42 




S4 


75 


159 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



65 



Table 9. — Deaths ^ Duration of Disease, Length of Stay in Sanatorium 
and Cause of Death. 





dxjkation of 
Tuberculosis. 


Length op Stat. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Under 1 month, 

1 to 2 months 

2 to 3 months, .... 

3 to 4 months, .... 

4 to 5 months 

5 to 6 months, .... 

6 to 7 months, .... 

7 to 8 months, .... 
9 to 10 months, .... 

1 to 2 years 

2 to 3 years 

3 to 4 years, .... 

5 to 6 years 

Unknown, 

Totals, .... 


- 

2 
9 

2 




1 

4 
1 

3 


1 



2 

13 
2 

2 
4 


7 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 


5 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 


12 
4 
2 
3 
3 
2 
2 


17 


11 


28 


' 17 


11 


28 



Cause of death, phthisis, 28. 



66 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



WESTFIELD STATE SANATOKIUM. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HENRY D. CHADWICK, M.D., . . . Superintendent. 

HARRY S. WAGNER, M.D., . . . Physician. 

ROY MORGAN, M.D., Physician. 



MARY C. ]\lAcNEiL, Supervisor of Nurses. 

HERBERT W. SMITH, .... Steward. 

WILLIAM H. AUSTIN, .... Chief Engineer. 

FRANK P. BUXTON, Farmer. 



Women:? X-^kj? 



CTocjerfid fore I y* 

1 r 



E.G. 6^ G.C. G>^f^DWER_ Aj^CHlTECTvS 



-61 -o"- 



JEKVICE- E>LDG. 



44 5-^"- 



E)L.ocfc- Plan - 



« Men j • W-^R-D 













1 


1 ■ ■ 1 . -i — r : 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 67 



REPORT OF THE SUPERIXTEIn^DE^^T. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Ladies axd Gextlemex: — On Feb. 16^ 1910, the sanato- 
rium was declared open by His Excellency the Governor. As 
soon thereafter as possible a staff of employees was engaged, 
and the buildings were put into condition for the reception of 
patients. The first one was admitted February 24. Applica- 
tions for admission from the western part of the State did not 
come in fast enough to fill the beds, and for that reason many 
patients from the eastern part of the State were admitted. The 
150 beds were filled for the first time on June 9. It was later 
found that 4 additional beds could be placed in each of the 
pavilions, thereby increasing the total capacity to 158. The 
daily average number of patients since opening has been 128.4. 
Three hundred and seventy-one patients have been admitted. 
Of this number, 214 have been discharged, leaving 157 patients 
in the sanatorium Xovember 30. The condition of patients on 
admission and discharge will be found in the appended tables 
of statistics. The average length of stay of all discharged pa- 
tients was 75 days. 

As it was more than three months after the opening of the 
sanatorium before all of the beds were filled, it brings our 
daily average number of patients down to 128.4. The gross 
per capita cost on this basis is $12.67; per capita cost, minus 
sales, $12.60; less total receipts, $10.64. 

Of the 371 patients admitted, 112 paid their board, the board 
of 101 was paid by cities or towns, 31 were State charges, and 
the status of 85 has not yet been determined. 

The daily average number of bed patients has been 23 men 
and 31 women, a total of 54. 

Forty-six patients stayed less than one month. A few of 



68 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



these left because of homesickness, but most of them went home 
when thev found that they could not recover, wishing to spend 
their last days with their relatives and friends. It is probable 
that at least one-half of this number did not live more than 
one month after reaching home. 

The two greatest difficulties in the way of successful treat- 
ment is to get patients to go to a sanatorium when tuberculosis 
first manifests itself, and when admitted, to induce them to 
remain long enough for the disease to become thoroughly ar- 
rested. 

Usually they insist upon returning home as soon as the active 
symptoms subside under the rest treatment. 'No physical exam- 
ination can determine what the degree of arrest is in an indi- 
vidual case, as at rest a patient may be apparently cured, but 
under home conditions of living and work the disease frequently 
lights up into renewed activity. These relapses can be largely 
prevented if while in the sanatorium patients will begin work 
as soon as they are able, gradually increasing the day's labor 
until it approximates the expenditure of energy required by the 
occupation to which they must return. If a patient has done 
this he has increased his resistance to tuberculosis to the point 
where he can become self-supporting, with a good prospect of 
keeping well. As most of our patients were beyond the in- 
cipient stage and with active disease, but little work could be 
expected from them the first few months. Many of these pa- 
tients, however, are now doing light work about the buildings. 
This next year I hope much more of the work in the dining 
room and wards and about the grounds can be done by patients. 

Impeoveme^^^ts. 

The grounds about the buildings have been graded and sur- 
faced with loam, with the exception of the west end of the 
women's ward and the rear and east end of the men's ward. A 
large amount of filling was necessary in front of the administra- 
tion building and women's ward. The special appropriation of 
$1,500 was insufficient to complete all of the grading. 

A coal bunker adjoining the boiler room, large enough to hold 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



69 



20 tons of coal, has been built of concrete. The bakeroom has 
been enlarged by an addition 10 by 12 feet. This was made 
necessary by the installation of a large portable tile oven. 

The farmhouse has been thoroughly repaired, piazzas added 
and plumbing installed. This now makes a very comfortable 
house of seven rooms and bath. 

A shed near the farmhouse has been made into a dormitory 
for the teamsters and farm hands. 

A covered corridor connecting the service and administra- 
tion buildings has been built. The service building, adminis- 
tration building and the infirmary section of the wards have 
been screened. 

Cold-storage rooms in the basement of the service building 
and a kitchen refrigerator have been built in, and a refrigerat- 
ing machine installed. This furnishes sufficient ice for our use, 
and ample refrigeration for all purposes. 

The outside of the barn has been shingled and the trimmings 
painted. A silo has been erected and filled with ensilage in 
anticipation of keeping some cows next year. Quite a good 
deal of work has been done on the interior of the barn. 

The 15 kilowatt turbine generator is now being installed. 
This will be ready for use as an auxiliary within two weeks. A 
gasoline pump has been installed in the pump house for emer- 
gency use in case the electric pump gets out of order. 

A piggery 135 by 26 feet has been erected and is now filled 
with 105 swine. Thirty-three of these hogs were purchased 
last spring. From these 72 pigs have been raised. 

Farm. 

Twenty acres of the best land had been under cultivation by 
the previous owner, and was allowed to grow up to weeds last 
year. This land and about 10 acres more was ploughed and 
planted with corn and potatoes, besides a small garden. One 
thousand bushels of ears of com were harvested, and the re- 
mainder of the corn was cut up for ensilage, which filled our 
80-ton silo. We raised 1,400 bushels of potatoes. Owing to 
the large amount of grading and other farm work necessary 



70 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



last spring our garden was late in being planted. However, 
we raised a fair amount of late snmmer and winter vegetables. 
Although 30 acres of the best hay land was under cultivation, 
we cut 45 tons of hay. 

Water Supply. 
Although it has been a very dry season our water supply has 
been ample to meet our needs. The water analyses which have 
been made once a month by the State Board of Health show 
about the same condition that existed last spring, except that 
there has been a slight improvement in the amount of iron 
present. 

I understand that the State Board of Health did not recom- 
mend the purchase of the neighboring farm last year, although 
they felt that that was the most probable source of contamina- 
tion, because they were uncertain as to the well yielding suffi- 
cient water. Xow that an ample supply of water has been 
obtained during the past very dry season, the State Board of 
Health in a letter to the trustees dated December 1, recommends 
the purchase of this farm, which is owned by Andrew Pignatare. 
The lowest price I have been able to obtain from him is $3,500. 
There are about 40 acres of land, a dwelling house of six rooms 
and a barn. An additional $500 would be needed to make 
repairs and provide some system of sewage disposal, or to re- 
move the house to a location where the sewage would not con- 
taminate our wells. The house could then be rented for $15 
a month to some of our married employees. 

We are making alterations in the barn so that we shall be 
able to keep 33 cows. I would like to start our dairy with at 
least 20 cows. That would require an appropriation of $1,500; 

One thousand dollars will be needed to finish the grading 
about the buildings. This should be done as early as possible, 
as the sand from the rear of the men's ward blows into the 
buildings, causing a great deal of annoyance to the patients. 

Dr. George L. Schadt, who has served efficiently as second 
assistant physician since March 2, resigned November 30 to 
go into private practice. Dr. Roy Morgan will succeed him 
as second assistant. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



71 



Laboeatory Work. 

Nine hundred and twenty-eight specimens of sputum have 
been examined. Of these, 441 were negative and 587 were 
positive. The sputum of 189 patients was positive on the first 
examination. In 30 other cases more than one specimen was 
examined before bacilli were found, as follows : Two specimens 
in 16 cases, three specimens in 7 cases, five specimens in 4 
cases, six specimens in 1 case and seven specimens in 2 cases. 
In 1 case bacilli were not found in the sputum but were 
found in the fasces. Seventy-nine other patients had negative 
sputum on repeated examination, or had no expectoration. The 
Von Pirquet skin test was used in all these cases. If this re- 
action was doubtful, a subcutaneous tuberculin test was used. 
Only 5 persons out of the 371 persons admitted proved to be 
free from tuberculosis. The above figures indicate that in 
making a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis but little weight 
can be placed on a negative sputum examination. Although 
some of our cases had extensive physical signs in their lungs, 
bacilli could be found only after repeated examinations. 

Examinations of the blood of patients have been made to 
determine the effect of sanatorium life and treatment on the 
constituents of the blood; 247 white counts have been made; 
9 red counts and 152 differential counts of the white cells. 
When sufficient material for a paper has been obtained, it is 
our intention to publish the findings. 

Acknowledgments. 
I wish to express my appreciation for the cordial feeling 
toward the sanatorium which has been shown in many ways 
by the people of Westfield, and to gratefully acknowledge their 
interest in the work of the institution. The clergymen have 
willingly provided Sunday services whenever possible. Mem- 
bers of the Westfield Band and the choir of the Advent Church 
have given us concerts. Magazines and books have been gen- 
erously contributed by the Women's Club of Brockton, and resi- 
dents of Webster, Springfield, Westfield and Holyoke. A total 



72 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 

of 49 books have been given, which form a nucleus for our 
library. 

To yoUj members of the Board of Trustees, I wish to express 
my gratitude for your support and confidence throughout the 
past year. The difficulties that arise in organizing a new in- 
stitution have been made much easier by your advice and en- 
couragement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY D. CHADWICK, 

Superintendent, 

Nov. 30, 1910. 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



73 



REPOET OF THE TREASUREE. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending l^ov. 30, 1910 ; — 



Cash Account. 
Receipts. 

Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates: — 

Private $6,650 61 

Cities and towns, . . 3,860 06 



$10,510 67 



Salaries, wages and labor: — 

Wages not called for, 18 73 



Sales: — 

Food, .... $7 10 

Clothing and materials, . 4 65 

Furnishings, ... 3 23 

Miscellaneous, . . . 219 82 



234 80 



Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Pigs and hogs, ...... 13 60 

Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances, . $17 09 

Sundries 3 80 



20 89 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30) $3,759 07 

Approved schedules of 1910, $61,292 63 

Less returned, . . 204 82 

61.087 81 



Special appropriations, ..... $14,109 38 
Less returned, ...... 88 85 



$10,798 69 



64,846 88 



14,020 53 



Total $89,666 10 



74 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, $10,798 69 

Maintenance appropriations: — 

Eleven months' schedules, 1910, . . . 61,087 81 

November advances, ..... 1,373 17 

S73,259 67 

Special appropriations: — 

Approved schedules, ........ 14,020 53 

Balance Nov. 30, 1910: — 

In bank, $1,839 38 

In office 546 52 

2,385 90 



Total, $89,666 10 



Maintenance. 

Appropriation, $65,236 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below), ....... 67,089 52 



Deficiency, . . $1,853 52 



Analysis of Expenses. 



Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration, 
Medical service, .' 
Ward service (male), . 
Ward service (female), 
Farm, stable and grounds, 



Food: — 
Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, . 

Fruit (dried and fresh). 

Meats, 

MHk, 

Molasses and syrup, 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 

Vegetables, 

Sundries, 



Clothing and materials: — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers. 
Clothing, ..... 
Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 



$10,176 26 
3,676 07 
1,566 84 
1,806 91 
4,741 08 



$2,267 11 
75 90 
42 57 
99 64 
292 38 
96 10 
2,264 79 
1,278 64 
604 08 
1,085 69 
7,300 14 
3,939 01 
53 46 
452 66 
200 04 
996 65 
491 38 



$8 25 
153 48 
63 27 



$21,967 16 



21,540 24 



Amounts carried forward, .... $225 00 



$43,507 40 



1910.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



75 



Amounts brought forward, 



$225 00 $43,507 40 



Clothing and material — Con. 
Furnishing goods, 
Leather and shoe findings, . 
Sundries, .... 

Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms. 

Carpets, rugs, etc.. 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc.. 

Furniture and upholstery. 

Kitchen furnishings. 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 

Sundries, .... 



Heat, light and power 
Coal, 

Freight on coal 
Wood, 

on, . 

Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Brick 

Cement, lime and plaster. 

Doors, sashes, etc.. 

Electrical work and supplies, 

Hardware, ..... 

Lumber, ..... 

Machinery, etc., .... 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., . 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, 

Roofing and materials. 

Sundries, ..... 



Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies. 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs. 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc.. 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Harnesses and repairs, . 
Horses, 

Other live stock, . 
Tools, farm machines, etc.. 
Sundries, 



Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc.. 
Chapel services and entertainments, 
Freight, expressage and transportation. 
Funeral expenses, 

Hose, etc., ..... 



3 80 
2 45 
35 81 



$2,081 76 
217 61 
92 75 
1,001 99 
1,745 76 
626 85 
125 13 
544 69 



$1,403 21 
1,573 67 
62 64 
33 52 
27 47 



S5 00 
163 19 
112 29 
647 76 
191 39 
408 27 
145 91 
489 19 
865 81 
135 43 
304 25 



$76 80 
123 62 
952 34 
686 48 
122 60 
600 00 
957 74 
256 71 
297 87 



$35 08 
27 18 

548 32 
55 00 

156 10 



267 06 



6,436 54 



3,100 51 



3,468 49 



4,074 16 



Amounts carried forward, 



$821 68 $60,854 16 



76 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, .... $821 68 S60,854 16 

Miscellaneous — Con. 

Ice, 126 32 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 2,624 63 

Postage, 141 94 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 935 14 

Stationery and office supplies, . 476 48 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . 183 52 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 305 40 

Cuspidor supplies, ..... 308 60 

Sundries 311 65 

6,235 36 



Total expenses for maintenance, ..... $67,089 52 

Special Appropriations. 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... $15,750 00 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), $14,020 53 
Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . 1 91 

14,022 44 



Balance Nov. 30, 1910, $1,727 56 

Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand, $2,385 90 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money) , 1 ,373 17 

Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 

November, 1910, schedule, .... 389 12 

$4,148 19 

LiahiLUies. 

Schedule of November bills $6,001 71- 



1910.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



77 



Jo 
pq s 



©.2 . 



H 5 



Oi CD o lO 

O O r-l 

(M CO rH 
CO 03 
O CO 



i-H ^ o »o o 

O (M O 00 O 

05 TtH 00 o 
CD C5 O 05 O 
<N C5 lO 



r-l Tfl O to O 

O (M O 00 O 

05 Ttl 00 O 
CD 05 O 05 O 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

o o o o o 
o o o o o 

to to CD^O tO^ 

i-Tr-TrH^lo'^C^ 

m 



a a &. a a 

^ 

^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

o o o «;> C3 
1— I »— I 1— I 1— I 1— ( 

05 05 05 05 05 
T— I rH »— I 1-H >— I 

O! CC CO CC M 
^ ^ +3 -tJ ^-^ 
O O O O 



05 



<D 03 



o 

<=> 2 



02 

O 

.S .2 

-rt o3 'S 



^ OJ S 



g 

ft PI a> 

• 02 T3 , 

ft^ O g 
O § ft ^ 
I— I 



W 1 



0) 



a 
-§ 

CO 



O 

CO 



p 

o 



78 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSmiPTn^S. 



[Dec. 



VALUATION 



Keal estate: — 

Cultivated land, 62 acres; wood land, 40 acres; pas- 
turage, 28 acres; administration building, service 
building, four ward buildings, piggery, bam, farm- 
house and power plant, $91,700 00 

Personal estate : — 



Live stock on farm, . 




$3,300 


00 


Produce of the farm on hand. 




2,216 


00 


Carriages and agricultural 


imple- 






ments, .... 




1,835 


00 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 


5,400 


00 


Beds and bedding, 




4,760 


00 






4,207 


00 


Personal property of State in 


super- 






intendent's department, . 




375 


00 






750 


00 


Provisions and groceries, . 




1,344 


00 


Drugs and medicines, . 




100 


00 


Fuel, 




50 


00 






25 


00 


Other supplies, undistributed, 




240 


00 



24,602 00 



$116,302 00 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



79 



LIST OF SALAKLED OFFICEES AXD EMPLOYEES. 



Snperintendent (per year) $2,500 00 

First assistant physician (per year), .... 1,400 00 

Second assistant physician (per year), 900 00 

Matron (per year), 900 00 

Chief engineer (per year), 1,000 00 

Chef (per month), 75 00 

Second cook (per month), 35 00 

Baker (per month), 60 00 

Storekeeper (per month) 30 00 

Four kitchen workers (per month), .... $20 00 to 25 00 

Five waiters (per month), 20 00 to 25 00 

Seven domestics (per month), 15 00 to 20 00 

Three head nnrses (per month), 40 00 

Four graduate nurses (per month), .... 35 00 

Six attendants and orderUes (per month), . . . $20 00 to 30 00 

Bookkeeper (per month), 45 00 

Stenographer (per month), 35 00 

Four stablemen and teamsters (per month), . . 30 00 

Four laborers (per day) (without board). ... 1 75 

Four laundry employees (per month), . . . $20 00 to 40 00 

Three assistant engineers (per month). . . . 50 00 to 60 00 

One fireman (per month) 50 00 

Foreman (per month), 75 00 

Housekeeper (per month), 35 00 

One general worker (per month), .... 35 00 

Telephone operator (per month), .... 20 00 



80 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



SPECIAL EEPOET. 



The following special report is prepared in accordance with 
a resolution of the ITational Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rections, adopted May 15, 1906 : — 



Population. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Niimber received during the year, 


202 


169 


371 


Number passing out of the institution during the year, 


126 


88 


214 


Number at the end of the fiscal year in the institution. 


78 


79 


157 


Daily average attendance (number of inmates actually pres- 


65.4 


63 


128.4 


ent) during the year. 








Average number of employees and officers during the year, . 


35 


22 


57 



Expenditures. 

Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, . . . $21,967 16 

2. Clothing, 267 06 

3. Subsistence, 21,540 24 

4. Ordinary repairs, .... 3,468 49 

5. Office, domestic and out-door ex- 

penses, 19,846 57 

Total, $67,089 52 

Extraordinary expenses : — 

1. New buildings, land, etc., . . $3,088 09 

2. Permanent improvements to ex- 

isting buildings, .... 11,314 54 

Total, : 14,402 63 



Grand total. 



$81,492 15 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



81 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Table 1. — Admissions and Discharges. 



Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients admitted, February 16 to November 30, 


202 


169 


371 


inclusive. 








Number of patients discharged, Februarj' 16 to November 30, 


126 


88 


214 


inclusi\e. 








Number of deaths (included in preceding item), . 


35 


19 


54 


Number remaining in sanatorium November 30, . 


78 


79 


157 


Daily average number of patients, 






128.4 


Daily average number of patients since June 1, . 






150.4 


Table 2. — Civil Condition of Patients admitted. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Married 


97 


91 


188 


Single, 


97 


66 


163 


Widowed 


8 


11 


19 


Divorced, 




1 


1 


Totals, 


202 


169 


371 


Table 3. — Age of Patients admitted. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1 to 14 years, .......... 


1 


12 


13 


14 to 20 years, 


24 


33 


• 57 


20 to 30 years, 


65 


72. 


137 


30 to 40 years, 


61 


34 


95 


40 to 50 years, .......... 


31 


7 


38 


Over 50 years, 


20 


11 


31 


Totals, 


202 


169 


371 



82 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTR^ES. 



[Dec. 



Table 4. — Nativity and Parentage of Patients admitted. 



Males. 



PLACES OF NATIVITY. 



United States: — 
Massachusetts, 
New England States, 
Other States, . 
Total native, 

Other countries: — 
Austria, . 
Canada, . 
Cuba, 
England, . 
Finland, . 
France, 
Germany, 
Greece, 
Ireland, 
Italy, 
Judea, 
Xorwaj', . 
Roumania, 
Russia, 
Scotland, . 
Sweden, . 
Syria, 

Switzerland, 
Ttirkey, . 
Wales, 
Unknown, 

Total foreign, 



73 



79 
202 



Females. 



77 



26 



10 



35 



Totals. 



134 



18 



180 

7 
39 
1 

13 
15 



371 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 83 



Table 5. — Residence of Patients admitted. 



Place. 


Number. 


Place. 


Number. 


Adams 


10 


Ludlow, 


1 

2 


Aldenville 


1 


Lynn, 


5 


Allston 


2 


Marlborough, .... 


1 ^ 


Amherst, 


1 


Medford, 


1 


Ashby, 


1 


Melrose, 


2 


T> ■ 1 i1. 1?— -..Ill . 

Baldwinville, .... 


2 


Milford 


2 


Barnstable, 




MillArille 




Berkshire, ..... 


1 


Milton, 




Blackatone, 


1 


Mittineague, 


1 


Boston, 


42 


Monson, 


4 


Brockton, ..... 


^ 


New Bedford 


2 


Cambridge 


2 


Newton Highlands, 


1 


Charlton City 


2 


North Adams 


7 


Onelsea, ...... 


2 


Northampton, .... 


4 


Cheshire, 




North Grafton 


1 


Chester, 




Norwood, 


2 


Chicoi>ee, 




Orange, 


2 


Dalton, ...... 




Pittsfield, 


8 


ijuoiey, ..... 




Palmer 


^ 


iiiast JNortnnela, .... 




Quincy, 


1 


l!<ast JfeppereU, .... 




Readville 


1 


Everett, ...... 




Salem, ...... 


2 


Fitchburg, ..... 


18 


Somerville 


7 


Florence, 




South Ashburnham, 




Gardner, 




South Framingham, 




Great Barrington, .... 




Southborough 


2 


ureenneld 




Southbridge 


7 


Groton, 




Springfield 


36 


uartsvule, ..... 




Sterling, 




Haverhill 




Stoneham, 




Hayden^^lle, 




Turner's Falls, .... 


1 


Holyoke 




Waltham, 


2 


Hudson, 




Ware 




Huntington 




Webster 


2 


Hyde Park, 




Westborough, .... 


1 


Lancaster, 




Westfield 


15 


Leominster, i 


2 


Westminster, 


1 


Lowell ' . . ! 


2 


Weston, 





84 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 5. — Residence of Patients admitted — Concluded. 



Place. 


Number. 


Place. 


Number. 


West Lynn, 


1 






West Springfield, .... 


1 




1 


West Townsend, .... 




Worcester, 


64 


Willimansett, .... 


2 


Total 


371 



Table 6. — Occupations. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Artist, .... 


1 




1 


Grocer 


1 






Attendant, 


1 






House cleaner, . 








Barber, .... 


2 




2 


Housekeeper, . 




66 


66 


Bartender, 


2 




2 


Houseworker, . 


1 


16 


17 


Blacksmith, 


3 




3 


Insurance agent. 


1 






Bookkeeper, 


1 


1 


2 


Janitor, .... 








Bronzer, . . . 


1 




1 


Laborer, . . . . 


16 




16 


Butcher, . . . . 


1 


- 




Laundryman, . 


1 


- 




Carpenter, 


i 




4 


Lithographer, . 


1 






Cashier, .... 


3 




3 


Machinist, 


8 






Charwoman, 




1 


1 


Manicurist, 




1 




Cigar binder, 




1 


1 


Merchant, .... 








Clerk, .... 


10 


7 


17 


Mill, . , . 


16 


20 


36 


Compositor, 




1 


1 


Milliner, .... 




2 


2 


Conductor, 


2 




2 


Motorman, 


2 




2 


Cook, .... 


1 


1 


2 


No work, .... 


1 


7 


8 


Coppersmith, , 


1 




1 


Office boy, 


1 




1 


Designei, .... 


1 




1 


Oysterman, 


1 




1 


Dressmaker, 




1 


1 


Painter, .... 


4 




4 


Engineer, .... 






1 


Paper hanger, . 


2 




2 


Electrician, 


3 




3 


Plumber, .... 


1 




1 


Electrotypist, . 


1 




1 


Porter, .... 


1 




1 


Elevator man, . 


1 




1 


Printer 


1 




1 


Factory 


14 


9 


23 


Brakeman, 


1 




1 


Farmer, .... 


3 




3 


Sailor, .... 


1 




1 


Foundry, .... 


2 




2 


Section hand, . 


2 




2 


Gardener, .... 


2 




2 


Shoemaker, 


7 


5 


12 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 85 



Table G. — Occupations — Concluded. 





















S 


1 
1 


DO 

1 




S 


£ 




















Signal service, . 


1 




1 


Telephone operator, . 


- 


1 




Slater, .... 


1 




1 


Tinsmith, .... 








Social worker, . 




1 




Traveling salesman, . 


1 






Steam fitter, 


2 




2 


Waiter, .... 


3 


8 


11 


Stenographer, . 




2 


2 j 


Wire maker, 


6 






Stoneworker, 


11 




11 


Window decorator, . 


1 






Student, .... 


7 


11 


18 ' 


Upholsterer, 


1 






Steward 


2 




2 


Woodworker, 


4 






Tailor 


4 




4 ; 


Unknown, 


9 






Teamster 


11 




11 


Totals, 


202 


169 


375 


Lineman, .... 


1 















Table 7. — Condition on Admission. 



\ Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Incipient, 


31 


38 


69 


Moderately advanced 


43 


48 


91 


Far advanced 


126 


78 


204 


Unclassified, 


2 




2 


Nontuberculous, 






5 


Totals 


202 


169 


371 



Table 8. — Condition on Discharge. 





:\Iale3. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Disease arrested 


31 


25 


46 


Lnproved, 


18 


13 


31 


Unimproved, 


33 


16 


49 


Died 


35 


19 


54 






3 


3 


Not considered, 


19 


12 


31 


Totals, 


126 


88 


214 



86 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTRTS. [Dec. 



Table 9. — Deaths. 





Duration- of Disease. 


SAXATORirM Res 


IDEXCE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Under 1 month. 








9 


6 


15 


1 to 3 months, 


2 


2 


4 


14 


3 


17 


3 to 6 months, 


2 


2 


4 


8 


9 


17 


6 to 9 months, 


_ 
o 




5 


4 


1 


5 


9 months to 1 year, . 














1 to 2 years 


17 


10 


27 








2 to 5 years 


5 


3 


8 








5 to 10 years, .... 


2 


2 


4 








10 to 15 years, .... 


1 




1 








Unknown, 


1 




1 








Totals, .... 


35 


19 


54 


35 


19 


.54 





Table 10. — Causes of Death. 





:sraie3. 


Females. 


Totals. 




33 


19 


52 


Valvular disease of heart, ...... 


2 




2 


Totals, 


35 


19 


54 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



87 



EUTLAND STATE SANATORIUM. 



CONSULTING PHYSICIANS. 

HERBERT C. CLAPP, M.D., .... Boston. 
EDWARD 0. OTIS, M.D., .... Boston. 

CONSULTING LABYNGOLOGIST. 

A. C. GETCHELL, M.D., Worcester. 



RESIDENT MEDICAL OFFICERS. 



P. CHALLIS BARTLETT, M.D., 
JAMES A. LYON, M.D., . 
JOHN M. WISE, M.D., 
HERBERT F. GAMMONS, M.D., 
CLARENCE MURPHY, . 
E. RAY BURNHAM, M.D., . 



Superintendent. 

Physician. 

Physician. 

Physician. 

Bacteriologist, 

Laboratory Assistant. 



MARY E. THRASHER, .... Matron and Superin- 
tendent of Nurses. 
CHARLES E. CARROLL, .... Steward. 

WALTER C. BROWN, Chief Engineer. 

FREDERICK H. DRURY Farmer. 



8S 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDED. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit the 
following report for the year ending Nov. 30, 1910. 

There was a daily average of 340 patients during the year. 
There were 762 patients admitted and 758 patients discharged. 
This includes 12 deaths, — 9 men and 3 women. 

The total expenditure for the year was $187,963.11, which, 
with a daily average of 340 patients, makes the per capita 
cost $10,598. Deducting from the total amount expended the 
amount received from the sale of supplies ($3,742.47), and 
adding the decrease of the supplies on hand from the inventory 
of the previous year ($541.46), gives us a per capita cost of 
$10,416. 

The increased expense for 1910 was largely due to the hiring 
of extra employees, made necessary because of the elimination 
of the custom of patients working for their board. There was 
also an increase in the farm expense during the past year be- 
cause of the poor harvest in 1909 of both hay and ensilage. 

Residence. 

This year the table giving the counties from which patients 
were admitted has been left out and the table giving the cities 
and the towns has been substituted. Boston furnished 235 pa- 
tients, or 30.84 per cent. 

Age. 

The average age of the men admitted was twenty-seven years 
and eight months; of the women admitted, twenty-seven years 
and seven months. 

There is still a constant inquiry relative to the admission of 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



89 



children. During the last year there were not any children 
admitted under fourteen years of age, and with the large num- 
ber of patients that we have I do not believe it advisable to 
admit any under this age. 

Results of Trf.atmext. 

The average sanatorium residence was 5 months and 23 days, 
IT days less than last year. There are in the house 22 patients 
that have been here over a year. 

The number of incipient cases that have been discharged as 
apparently cured is considerably less than last year, chiefly due 
to the decreased length of stay. There were 9tt nonconsidered 
eases during the year. These are cases that stayed in the sana- 
torium less than six weeks. There were 120 far-advanced 
cases admitted, — 12 more than last year. The number of ad- 
vanced cases has increased steadily during the past few months. 

During the month of Xovember we have had under treat- 
ment more patients than at any time since the sanatorium 
opened, the daily average being 3-18 cases. 

The average gain in weight of the considered cases is as fol- 
lows: men, 15 pounds; women. 12.5 pounds. Largest indi- 
vidual gain: a man, 651 o pounds: a woman. 421 o pounds. 

Laboeatoey. 

There has been a great deal of laboratory work done during 
the past year and of a varied nature. As this part of the work 
seems important, I will give a little resume of what has been 
done. There have been 116 autogenous bacterial vaccines made, 
and in some cases where these have been used the opsonic index 
has been taken. Faeces were examined for tubercle bacilli in 
56 cases, with some animal inoculations. 

There were 122 special urinary analyses and microscopic ex- 
aminations, including quantitative determination of total sol- 
ids, urea, chlorides and total nitrogen in a small per cent, of 
cases. 

Work has been started to study tissue changes in animals that 
have been given tuberculin subcutaneously. Various kinds of 
tuberculin have been used in regularly increasing doses. 



90 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Sixty blood examinations have been made, including red and 
white and differential counts. The sputum of each patient is ex- 
amined regularly every month. The sputum examinations will 
average 400 a month. Besides this there have been 100 special 
examinations for tubercle bacilli and associated organisms. 

There are also regular chemical analyses made of milk and 
cream that we purchase, and during the summer months the 
milk and cream are examined bacterially. 

ImPEO VEME NTS. 

The nurses' home was finished during the spring and was 
occupied June 11. The verandas on the east side of the in- 
firmary (second floor) have been roofed in, also the veranda on 
the second floor of ward L. 

There are always a great number of repairs in buildings of 
this kind and I believe we will need to do more next year than 
we did last. 

Improvements desired. 

There has been a constant increase in the number of electric 
lights because of new buildings. Last year the electric plant 
was overloaded, and since that time we have added the new 
nurses' home. This greatly overloads our generator. For the 
purpose of taking care of this overload we need 1 150 kilowatt 
dynamo and engine. To do this work we would require $4,840. 

Last year the State Board of Health recommended the relay- 
ing of 1,900 feet of Akron sewer pipe with iron pipe. For this 
purpose we need $1,975. 

The new nurses' home has no hydrant near it. This hydrant 
is needed, also some new hose and fire extinguishers. We need 
for this purpose $400. 

The mile of road across the sanatorium grounds has a great 
deal of teaming over it. This road needs repairing and part 
of it will have to be entirely rebuilt. The State engineer's 
office last year estimated that this would cost $1,400. 

The present horse barn is badly out of repair. We also need 
carriage room and a place to store farm implements. The old 
buildings are also very unsightly. Plans and specifications for 
this barn were made last year. The figures obtained from the 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



91 



contractor show that it would cost $8,950 to build this barn of 
wood. 

In the present carpenter shop we have no machinery. With 
a plant of this size we are constantly needing all kinds of wood 
finish. At the present time we have to send several miles to 
have even the smallest piece of mill work done. This is ex- 
pensive. I recommend an addition to the carpenter shop for 
the purpose of installing woodworking machinery. This would 
cost $700. The machinery , including a drill for ironwork, 
would cost $835. 

The infirmary veranda space is not large enough to accom- 
modate all the patients. I recommend its extension. This 
would cost $965. 

There has been a steady increase in the number of infirmary 
cases. Upper and lower L, with their annexes, seem suitable 
for an infirmary. The kitchen could be made in the basement. 
These changes, with the furnishings, would cost $1,255. 

The present infirmary has an operating room on the second 
floor. We also have to carry all of our very sick women pa- 
tients up the stairs. I recommend the installation of an eleva- 
tor, at a cost of $1,500. 

The increase in the number of very sick patients frequently 
makes it necessary to carry a patient back and forth to the sta- 
tion on a cot. We have no wagon suitable for this work. I 
recommend the purchase of an ambulance, at a cost of $450. 

The walk between the administration building and center is 
covered with tin and a wooden walk placed on this. There is 
a constant expense to keep this in repair. I recommend that 
this be covered with tar concrete, at an expense of $150. 

Training School. 
The training school has been carried on successfully and at 
present there are 10 young ladies taking the course. There 
seems to be a constant demand for nurses who have been trained 
in tuberculosis work. 



92 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Medical Service. 

In September Dr. Geo. !N^. Lapham resigned, to take up pri- 
vate practice. Dr. Lapham has been here as assistant physi- 
cian since Jan. 1, 1901. His skill as a medical ofl&cer and his 
long service made him a valuable man for the sanatorium. His 
resignation was regretted by all who knew him. 

Dr. John M. Wise was appointed as assistant physician dur- 
ing the early part of the year, and took up his work January 8. 

On the resignation of Dr. Lapham in September Dr. Gam- 
mons, who had served as an interne for a year, was appointed 
as assistant physician. 

We are greatly indebted to the many friends of the sanato- 
rium for their unfailing generosity, and to the patients them- 
selves, who are always ready to help forward the work of the 
institution. 

The unfailing support which I have received from the officers 
and employees has made possible whatever measure of success 
we have attained. 

For the assistance and support of your Board I am deeply 
grateful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. CHALLIS BARTLETT. 

Nov. 30, 1910. 



1910.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



93 



REPORT OE THE TREASURER. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending l^ov. 30, 1910 : — 



Balance Dec. 1, 1909, 



Cash Account. 



S4,276 29 



Institution Receipts. 
Board of inmates : — 
Private, . 

Reimbursements (charitable 

association), 
Cities and towns. 
Soldiers' relief (State aid and 

minors), .... 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 
Wages not called for, . 

Sales : — 
Food, 

Clothing and materials, 

Furnishings, 

Heat, light and power. 

Repairs and improvements. 

Miscellaneous, 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Cows and calves, 
Pigs and hogs, 
Sundries, 

Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances. 
Sundries, 



Receipts. 



S38,467 85 

1,500 05 
10,397 92 

571 05 



$1,595 61 
126 45 
61 23 
2 40 
118 21 
1,792 10 



S252 


50 


2,195 


12 


2 


85 


$159 


99 


15 


00 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance of 1909, 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30), 

Approved schedules of 1910, 

Special appropriations, . . . . . 



$50,936 87 
46 47 



3,696 00 



2,450 47 



174 99 



$6,573 94 

8,500 00 
175,366 14 



57,304 80 



190,440 08 
9,296 44 



Total, $261,317 61 



94 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSmiPTR^S. 



[Dec. 



Payme7its. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, S57,304 80 

Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1909, . . 10,969 38 

Eleven months' schedules, 1910, . . . 175,366 14 

November advances, ..... 5,933 08 



$249,573 40 

Special appropriations: — 

Approved schedules ($9,296.44 less advances of November, 

1909, $119.15) 9,177 29 

Balance Nov. 30, 1910: — 

In bank, $589 05 

In office, 1,977 87 

2,566 92 



Total, $261,317 61 



Maintenance . 

Appropriation $184,000 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below). ....... 187,963 11 



Deficiency, $3,963 11 



Analysis of Expenses 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration. 
Medical ser^dce, . 
Ward ser^dce (male), . 
Ward ser^ace (female). 
Repairs and improvements, 
Farm, stable and grounds, 



Food: 



Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers. 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, . 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 

Meats, 

Milk, 

Molasses and sjTiip, 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 

Vegetables, 

Sundries, 



$39,472 84 
4,594 60 
1,344 39 
5,824 25 
3,156 68 
7,717 02 



$6,931 57 
381 75 
122 12 
88 77 
821 31 
125 70 
9,615 19 
2,136 62 
1,994 42 
2,484 18 
36,072 09 
9,713 26 
42 58 
1,867 23 
1,098 20 
3,790 64 
428 63 



$62,109 78 



77,714 26 



Amount carried forujard, 



$139,824 04 



191C.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



95 



Amount brought forward, 



Clothing and materials : — 

Boots, shoes and mbbers, .... $5 00 

Furnishing goods, ..... 25 



Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . . . $2,171 06 

Brushes, brooms, ..... 266 31 

Carpets, rugs, etc., ..... 63 50 

Crockery, glassware, cutlerj', etc., . . . 751 28 

Furniture and upholstery, .... 788 32 

Kitchen furnishings, ..... 427 17 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., . . 39 30 

Sundries 277 35 



Heat, light and power 
Coal, 
Wood, 

Teaming coal. 
Oil, . 
Sundries, 



$12,465 92 
21 50 
1,685 62 
252 87 
436 90 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Cement, lime and plaster, .... $106 65 

Doors, sashes, etc., ..... 60 00 

Electrical work and supplies, . . 257 28 

Hardware, 401 51 

Lumber, 412 41 

Machinery, etc., ...... 92 40 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., 673 09 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, . . 1,249 83 

Roofing and materials, .... 6 90 

Sundries, ....... 59 55 



Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Blacksmith and supplies, .... $168 15 

Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, . . 78 20 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., . . . 1,330 73 

Hay, grain, etc., 6,082 71 

Harnesses and repairs, . . . 51 95 

Horses, 240 00 

Other live stock. 434 93 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 235 75 

Sundries, 1,228 00 



Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc $120 10 

Chapel services and entertainments, . . 505 00 

Freight, expressage and transportation, . . 969 72 

Hose, etc., 6 50 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 3,181 65 

Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra), . 135 00 



$139,824 04 



5 25 



4,784 29 



14,862 81 



3,319 62 



9,850 42 



Amounts carried forward, 



$4,917 97 $172,646 43 



96 HOSPITALS FOR CONSmiPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward. 



$4,917 97 $172,646 43 



Miscellaneous — Con. 

Examining applicants, 
Postage, .... 
Printing and printing supplies, 
Printing annual report, 
Cuspidor supplies, 
Soap and laundry supplies, . 
Stationery and office supplies. 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph. 
Water, .... 
Sundries, . . . . 



1,411 33 
440 54 
636 75 
167 90 

1,656 98 

1,237 20 
739 39 
244 63 
923 53 

2,394 47 
545 99 



15,316 68 



Total expenses for maintenance. 



$187,963 11 



Special Appropriations. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1909 $9,415 86 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), $9,296 44 

Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . 119 42 

$9,415 86 

Resources and Liabilities. 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, $2,566 92 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money) , 5,933 08 

Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 

November, 1910, schedule, .... 133 86 

$8,633 86 

Liabilities. 

Schedule of November biUs, $12,596 97 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT 



— No. 



77. 



T3 


CO (M 




a 


o CO o 












1—4 


1—1 


























m 






3 


!>. CO 00 


00 


05 CD 05 




'd . 


O 05 05 


o 




00 Oi 05 


00 




OO 05 CO 




■'^'"i— Ti— r 


od" 










m 






o o 






O o 

w ^ w 






o 






00 O T-i 


Oi 


OJ M ® 


to Tti CO 


C<l 


r 












o o o 


o 




o o o 


o 


o 
G 
■< 


o o o 
o o o 


o 






a) 




oo" 


1 




1— 1 




€^ 






l> l> t> 






I> l> I> 






^ ^ ^ 
















o o o 










oTaTcr 






o o o 




o 


05 Oi 05 






1-H 1— 1 T— 1 






02 CC tZ2 
OJ <D <D 










PhPhPh 












a 






o 
























CIS 






















fECT. 






m 


IS 




O 


d furnis 
as, . 
s, 






d 

^ S 






















rue 
ioni 
ase 
















j 






i 







• i-H 

en 
>^ 

1 



PC 



< 



98 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



VALUATIOX. 



By valuation of William C. Temple and Louis M. Haiiff on the 
nineteenth day of December, 1910. 

Real estate : — 

Roadway and sewer beds. 21 acres at 



Personal estate : — 

Live stock on fai'm. .... 
Produce of the fann on hand. . 
Carriages and agi'icultiii'al implements. 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures. . 
Beds and bedding- in inmates' depart- 
ment. 



$100. 


$2,100 00 


Cultivated land, 120 acres at $90, 


10,800 00 


Woodland, 90 acres at $32, 


2,880 00 


Pastui-age, 122 acres at $22, 


2,681 00 


Lawn, 12 acres at $500, 


6,000 00 


dings : — 




Nihin house, 


$900 00 


Old farmhouse. 


2,200 00 


Xew farmhouse, 


1,000 00 


Farm bams and outbuildings, . 


1,500 00 


Silo, 


200 00 


Piggery 


1,320 00 


Xew cow barn. 


9,000 00 


Henneiy, 


1,500 00 


Carpenter shop, 


500 00 


Coal trestle, 


1,600 00 


Pavilion, 


1,700 00 


Institution building and present fijs:- 




tures. 


428,300 00 


Xui-ses' home, 


14,881 00 


Roads and seAverage svstem. 


20,000 00 



$9,194 25 
2,277 10 
1,338 00 
1,^00 00 



8.000 00 



$24,464 00 



487.601 00 



Amounts carried forward. 



$22,609 35 $512,065 00 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 



99 



Amounts brought forward, . . . $22,609 35 $512,065 00 
Personal estate — Con. 



Other furniture in inmates' 


depart- 






ment, .... 




y.ouu 




X^crbOUdl piUptfllV Oi OldLc 111 


BUpcl 






111 LCllUCllL S ClC^dl LUlCilL, . 




±fO\J\J 


no 


Ready-made clothing, . 




250 


00 


Drv goods, .... 




1,691 


72 


Provisions and groceries, . 




1,144 


39 


Drugs and medicines, . 




758 


27 


Fuel 




1,728 


00 






1,000 


00 


Other supplies undistributed, 




853 


60 



41,035 33 



Total, 



$553,100 33 



100 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



FARM ACCOmTT. 



Dr. 

Products of the farm on hand, as estimated Dec. 

1, 1909, 

Stock on hand, as estimated Dec. 1, 1909, 



General expense: — 
Blacksmith, 
Coal, 
Fertihzer, 
Hardware, 
Harness repairs, 
Hay and grain, . 
Horse, 
Shavings, . 
Simdries, . 
Teaming (outside), 
Tools, etc., 
Wagon repairs, . 
Labor, 



$103 25 
42 08 
1,232 61 
7 23 
67 05 
4,750 91 
240 00 
154 17 
144 74 
720 62 
85 86 
13 00 
6,119 88 



Material, etc., produced by other departments 
of sanatorium for farm department: — 
Board of employees, . . $1,612 50 



Carpenter department, 
Engineer department. 
Painter department, . 
Waste, sanatorium kitchen, 



7 81 
30 88 
6 46 
200 00 



$2,401 40 
367 79 



$13,681 40 



1,857 65 



$2,769 19 



15,539 05 



$18,308 24 



Or. 

Produce of farm delivered to sanatorium: 
Apples, 25 barrels, at $1.75 to $2.50, . 
Beans (shell), 27i bushels, at $0.70 to $1.25, 
Beans (wax), 48 bushels, at $0.60 to $1.00, 
Beets, 103 bushels, at $0.65 to $1.00, . 
Cabbage, 5,424 pounds, at $0.00f to $0.01 f, 
Carrots, 153 bushels, at $0.60 to $1.75, 
Cauliflower, 126 dozen, at $0.90 to $3.00, 
Cucumbers, 35 bushels, at $1.00 to $1.75, 
Cucumbers (small), 993 dozen, at $0,046, 
Celery, 13 bushels, at $0.50, 
Corn, 332* dozen, at $0.08 to $0.12, 



$47 04 
24 65 

37 65 
76 95 
54 28 

105 75 
184 65 
40 51 
45 67 
6 50 

38 08 



Amount carried forward. 



$661 73 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



101 



Amount brought forward, .... 


$661 


73 


Produce of farm delivered to sanatorium — Con. 






Hay, 157 pounds, ...... 


1 


61 


Leeks, 66| dozen, at $0.50, .... 


33 


25 


Lettuce, 191 dozen, at S0.25 to $0.50, . 


72 


72 


Milk, 125,438 quarts, at $0.04^ 


5,644 


72 


Onions, 25^ bushels, at S0.45 to $0.85, . 


18 


65 


Onion top, 600 bushels, at $0.01 1, 


10 


02 


Parsley, 17 pecks, at $0.40 to $0.50, 


6 


85 


Parsnips, 28 bushels, at $1.00, .... 


28 


00 


Pork, 7,203 pounds, at $0.11 to $0.14, . 


909 


61 


Peas, 18^ bushels, at $1.25 to $1.50, . 


25 


63 


Peppers, 4J bushels, at $0.65 to $0.75, . 


3 


82 


Potatoes, 178 bushels, at $0.57^ to $0.60, 


104 


38 


Radishes, 1,105 bunches, at $0.20 dozen, 


16 


73 


Rhubarb, 1,046 pounds, at $0.02, 


20 


92 


Squash, 14,884 pounds, at $0.01 to $0.01 i . 


219 


88 


Squash (summer), 127 dozen, at $0.40 to $0.50, 


53 


37 


Spinach, 1 peck, ...... 




05 


Tomatoes, 204 bushels, at $0.40 to $1.00, 


117 


10 


Turnips, 86 bushels, at $0.50 to $0.75, . 


46 


45 



$7,995 49 



Sales : — 

Live stock, hogs $113 00 

Live stock, cows and calves, .... 252 50 

Pork, 25,190 pounds, 2,082 12 

Com 2 85 

2,450 47 

Sanatorium, board of driving and express horses, 

5 at $20, 12 months $1,200 00 

Service, labor and teaming for sanatoriimi, putting 
in ice, hauling provisions, filter beds, etc., . . 2,266 43 

3,466 43 

Stock: — 

Products of farm on hand, as estimated Dec. 1, 1910, $2,277 10 

Stock on hand Dec. 1, 1910 314 26 

2,591 36 



$16,503 75 



Deficit against farm, 



$1,804 49 



102 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



POULTEY DEPAETME^TT. 



Dk. 

Stock, 

General expense: — 
Grain and feed, .... $1,387 44 

I'oultry, 440 34 

Water, 4 90 

Salaries and wages, . . . 667 82 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Lumber, 48 13 

Wire netting, . . . . 26 95 

Steam fittings, .... 4 65 

Hardware, 40 



Sundries : 
Oil, . 

Machinery, 
Straw, 
Coal, . 
Sundries, 



16 47 
35 60 

20 52 

21 97 
14 84 



$2,690 03 



Material, etc., produced by other depart- 
ments of sanatorium for poultry de- 
partment : — 
•Board of employees, . . . $417 06 
Engineer department (labor), . 3 79 
Patient board workers, . . 73 68 
Farm department (teaming), . 49 50 
Farm department (mangles), . 1 80 



545 83 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 103 



Cr. 

Products of poultry department delivered to sanatorium : — 
Poultry, 2,616 pounds, .... $455 15 

Eggs, 6,288 dozen, 1,852 77 

Fertilizer, 219 barrels, .... 104 50 

49 loads, 36 75 

$2,449 17 

Stock: — 

Sundries, $35 45 

Grain, etc., 30 82 

Poultry, 1,083 00 

1,149 27 



$3,598 44 



Deficit against poultry department. 



$589 07 



104 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS AISTD EMPLOYEES. 



Superintendent and treasurer (per annum), 




$2,500 


00 


Physician (per annum), 






1,100 


00 


Physician (per annum), 






1,000 


00 


Physician (per annum), 






800 


00 


Matron (per annum), 






1,200 


00 


Steward (per annum), 






1,500 


00 


Chief engineer (per annum), .... 






1,200 


00 


Farmer (per annum), 






900 


00 


Bookkeeper (per week, without living), 






9 


25 


Stenographer (per week), 






9 


25 


Office assistant (per week, without living), . 






6 


90 


Clerk (female, per week), . . . . ' . 






5 


75 


Clerk (male, per week, without living). 






9 


25 


Pharmacist (per week), 






4 


00 


Bacteriologist (per week), 






11 


50 


Nurses (per week), 


. $6 


90 


to 9 


25 


Nurses (night, per week), 






9 


25 


Attendants (per week), 


. $2 


75 


to 5 


75 


Night attendants (per week, without living). 






11 


05 


Cook (per week, without living), . 






19 


60 


Assistant cook (per week), ..... 






9 


25 


Baker (per week, without living). 






18 


45 


Supervisors (male, per week), .... 


. $5 


00 


to 9 


25 


Supervisors (female, per week), .... 


. 4 


00 


to 7 


00 


General work (male and female, per week), 


. 2 


75 


to 5 


75 


Storekeeper (per week), ..... 






11 


50 


Storeroom helpers (per week), .... 


. $3 


00 


to 5 


00 


Engineer and fireman (per week, without living). 






13 


85 


Engineer (per week, without living), . 






15 


00 


Fireman (per week), 


. $6 


90 


to 8 


05 


Laundress (per week), 






9 


00 


Laundry help (male, per week), . . . . 


. $3 


50 


to 7 


00 


Laundry help (female, per week). 


. 3 


25 


to 5 


50 


Kitchen help (per week), 


. 3 


45 


to 5 


45 


Butcher (per week, without living), . 






8 


05 


Waiters (per week), 


. $3 


45 


to 5 


75 


Waitress (per week), 






3 


45 



1910.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 



105 



Serving rooms (male, per week), . 
Serving rooms (female, per week), 
Diet kitchen help (per week), 
Expressman (per day, without living), 
Coachman (per week). 
Farm help (per week), . 
Farm help (per day, without li\dng) 
Poultry manager (per week). 
Carpenters (per day, without li\dng) 
Carpenter (per week). 
Painter (per day, without living). 



$3 45 to 

$2 75 to 

$3 45 to 
5 75 to 
1 75 to 

$2 70 



4 40 
3 45 

5 75 

1 75 

6 90 

6 90 

2 00 
10 35 

to 3 00 

7 00 
2 50 



106 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



SPECIAL EEPORT. 



The following special report is prepared in accordance with 
a resolution of the ^sTational Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rections, adopted May 15, 1906: — 



Population. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients present at beginning of fiscal year, 


184 


162 


346 


Number received during year, 


396 


366 


762 




402 


356 


758 


Number of deaths included in preceding item. 


9 


3 


12 




178 


172 


350 


Daily average attendance (i.e.), number of inmates actually 

present) during year. 
Average number of officers and employees during the year, . 


179 
122 


161 

66 


340 
188 



Expenditures. 

Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, . . . $62,109 78 

2. Clothing, 5 25 

3. Subsistence, 77,714 26 

4. Ordinary repairs, .... 30,150 73 

5. Office, domestic and outdoor ex- 

penses, 17,983 09 



Extraordinary expenses : — 

1. New buildings, land, etc., . . . $7,584 04 

2. Permanent improvements to exist- 

ing buildings, .... 1,402 40 



$187,963 11 



8,986 44 



Grand total, $196,949 55 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



107 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Table 1. — Admissions and Discharges. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


N\imber of patients in sanatorium Dec. 1, 1909, . 


184 


162 


346 


Number admitted Nov. 30, 1909, to Dec. 1, 1910, . 


396 


366 


762 


Number discharged Nov. 30, 1909, to Dec. 1, 1910, 


402 


356 


758 


Number of deaths (included in preceding item), . 


9 


3 


12 


Number remaining in sanatorium Nov. 30, 1910, . 


178 


172 


350 


Daily average number of patients, 


179 


161 


340 



Table 2. — Monthly Admissions and Discharges, with Average Monthly 

Population. 







Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Daily 
Average. 




Date. 


Males. 


Females. 


Males. 


Females. 




1909. 














1910. 


27 


23 


25 


28 


342 


January, . 




34 


31 


37 


31 


342 


February, . 




21 


29 


19 


34 


337 


March, 




35 


30 


41 


23 


342 


April, 




44 


36 


49 


38 


331 


May, . 




37 


33 


33 


33 


334 


June, . 




35 


25 


35 


20 


335 


July, . 




37 


16 


33 


14 


342 


August, 




23 


39 


29 


42 


341 


September, 




37 


43 


35 


37 


338 


October, 




35 


31 


36 


30 


345 


November, 




31 


30 


30 


26 


348 


Totals, 




396 


366 


402 


356 





108 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 3. — Admissions and Discharges from the Beginning of the Sana- 
torium. 





Nu.iiib6r. 


Per Cent. 




8,118 


- 




7,768 




Not considered 


1,499 






6,269 






3,005 


47.93 




2,644 


42.17 




620 


9.89 


Died 


71 





Table 4. — Civil Condition of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




220 


165 


385 




165 


172 


337 




11 


28 


39 


Divorced, 




1 


1 


Totals, 


396 


366 


762 


Table 5. — Age of Patients admitted. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 












80 


62 


142 


20 to 30 years, 


145 


160 


305 




106 


107 


213 




47 


35 


82 




18 


2 


20 




396 


366 


762 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 109 



Table 6. — Stage of Disease at Admission. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Per Cent. 




130 


155 


285 


37.4 


Moderately advanced, 


184 


172 


356 


46.7 




81 


39 


120 


15.7 










.1 


Totals, 


396 


366 


762 





Table 7. — Nativity of Patients admitted. 



Patient born in — 


00 


males. 




Patient born in — 


i 


males. 


CO 




"a 


o 












United States, . 


294 


259 


553 


Scotland, .... 


4 


1 


5 


Canada, .... 


14 


42 


56 1 


Prince Edward Island, 




1 


1 


England, .... 


10 


5 


15 


Austria 


1 




1 


Ireland, .... 


27 


21 


48 


Poland 


2 




3 


Italy 


2 


2 


4 


Finland 


1 




2 


Norway, .... 






1 


St. Helena, 






1 


Sweden 


10 


10 


20 


Syria, .... 


1 






Germany, .... 


6 


4 


10 


Azores, .... 


1 




1 


Russia, .... 


21 


10 


31 J 


Greece, .... 


1 






New Foundland, 




5 


5 


Hungary, .... 






1 


Peru 




1 






















Roumania, 




1 


1 i 


Totals, 


396 


366 


762 



Table 7. — Nativity of Patients admitted — Concluded. 



Father born in — 


Males. 


s 

s 


Totals. 


Father born in — 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


United States, . 


3 


2 


5 


Roumania, 






1 


Canada, .... 


37 


66 


103 


Scotland, .... 


7 


3 


10 


England, .... 


17 


20 


37 


Prince Edward Island, 




1 


Ireland, .... 


98 


98 


196 


Austria, .... 




2 


3 


Italy 


2 


2 


4 


Poland 


2 


2 


4 


Norway, .... 


3 




3 


Finland, .... 


2 


2 


4 


Sweden, .... 


19 


15 


34 


Bohemia, .... 


1 






Germany 


10 


10 


20 


Syria, .... 


1 






Riissia, .... 


28 


14 


42 


Belgium, .... 








Western Islands, 








Azores, .... 


2 


1 


3 


Denmark, 






1 


Holland 






1 


New Foundland, 
Peru, 


3 


6 


9 








1 




1 


Totals, 


241 


246 


487 


Portugal 


1 




1 





110 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 8. — Residence of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




Males. 


1 

Females. 


Totals. 


Boston, .... 


125 


110 


235 


Great Barrington, 


1 


- 


1 


Worcester, .... 


23 


17 


40 


Winthrop, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Fall River, 


7 


9 


16 


Salem 


2 


1 


3 


Cambridge, 


15 


10 


25 


Northbridge, 


1 


- 


1 


Springfield, 


6 


7 


13 


Auburndale, 


2 


1 


3 


Lowell 


9 


6 


15 


Holliston, .... 


- 


1 


1 


Lawrence, .... 


6 


10 


16 


Douglas 


1 


- 


1 


Pittsfield, .... 


6 


3 


9 


Littleton 


1 


- 


1 


New Bedford, . 


10 


3 


13 


Maiden, .... 


4 


4 


8 


Lynn, .... 


16 


17 


33 


Agawam 


- 


1 


1 


Quincy, .... 


2 


4 


6 


Athol, .... 


2 


1 


3 


Gardner, .... 


4 


12 


16 


Dedham, .... 


- 


4 


4 


Brockton 


17 


9 


26 


Fitchburg, 


7 


10 


17 


Haverhill, 


8 


2 


10 


Billerica 


- 


1 


1 


Hyde Park, 


5 


2 


7 


Dalton, .... 


2 


4 


6 


Newburj'port, . 


3 


- 


3 


Shirley 


1 


- 


1 


Somerville, 


11 


17 


28 


Holyoke, .... 


3 


2 


5 


Brookline, 


2 


2 


4 


Williamsburg, . 


1 


- 


1 


Andover, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Watertown, 


- 


3 


3 


Chelsea, .... 


5 


4 


9 


Westminster, 


- 


1 


1 


Monson, .... 


1 


- 


1 


Framingham, . 


2 


6 




Rockland, 


- 


1 


1 


Ludlow, .... 


- 


1 


1 


Housatonic, 


- 


1 


1 


Gloucester, 


2 


5 


7 


Everett, .... 


3 


3 


6 


Greenfield, 


- 


1 


1 


Milford 


1 


2 


3 


Hanover, .... 


1 


- 


I 


Natick 


1 






Florence, .... 




- 


1 


Westfield 


1 


1 


2 


Weymouth, 






2 


Chartley, .... 


1 




1 


Baldwinville, . 






1 


Stockbridge, 


2 




2 


Arlington, 




1 


2 


Hingham, .... 




1 


1 


Peabody, .... 






1 


Indian Orchard, 




2 


2 


Everett, .... 




2 


3 


Westwood, 




1 


1 


Feeding Hills, . 






1 


Attleborough, . 


12 


6 


18 


Adams, .... 




2 


3 


Charlton 


1 




1 


Williamstown, , 








Leominster, 


2 


3 


5 


Waltham 


2 


5 


7 


West Sutton, . 




1 


1 


Franklin 






1 



1910.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. • 111 



Table S. — Residence of Patients admitted — Concluded. 



Cities axd Towns. 




s 


to 

B 


Cities axd Towks. 




J 


JO 














1 


1 


Majnard 


2 


2 


4 


Kingston 


1 




1 


Bellingham, 


1 




1 


Milton, .... 




2 


2 


Middleborough , 


2 


1 


3 


Shelbume, 




1 




Bridgewater, 


3 




3 


Hanson, .... 








Woronoco, 


1 




1 


Winchendon, 




1 




Concord, .... 


1 


1 


2 


Rajuham, 


1 






Westford, .... 


1 




1 


Charlemont, 




1 




Foxborough, 




1 


1 


Woburn, .... 


4 






Dan vers, .... 




2 


2 


Clinton 




1 




Amesburj-, 


* 




1 


Revere 


3 


2 




Hopedale, .... 


1 




2 


Newton, .... 


^ 


3 




Bedford, .... 


1 




1 


Wellesley 




1 




Winchester, 




1 


1 


Groveland, 




1 




Taunton 


2 




2 


Marblehead, 


1 


^ 




Brookfield, 




1 


1 


West Upton, 




1 




Wakefield, 


2 




2 


Palmer 




1 




Webster, .... 




2 


2 


Merrick, .... 








Wrentham, 


1 




1 


Belchertown, 


1 






Cliftondale, 


1 




1 


Rutland 


2 


2 




Petersham, 


1 




1 


Brj-antville, 




1 




Melrose 




1 


1 


Belmont, .... 


1 






Milbury, .... 


1 




1 


Medford 


3 


3 


6 


Amherst, .... 




. 1 


1 


Rockport 




2 


2 


Reading 


1 






Needham, 


1 




2 


Norwood, .... 


2 


1 


3 


Totals, 


396 


366 


762 



Table 9. — Occupations. 





Males. 


Females. 




Males. 


Females. 


Dentist 


1 




Druggist, 


3 


- 


Domestic, 




14 


Factory 


84 


59 


Draftsman, 


2 




Farmer, .... 


5 




Dressmaker, . 




2 


Stoker, stationary. 


2 




Electrician, 


5 




Foreman, 


4 




Elevator boy, . 


2 




Gas fitter, 


1 




Engineer, locomotive, . 






Housewife, 




160 


Engineer, statbnary. 


1 




Housework, 




21 



112 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 9. — Occupations — Concluded. 





Males. 


Females. 




Males. 


Females. 


Insurance, 


3 




Hairdresser, . 




1 


Ironworker, 


8 




Deaconess, 




1 


Janitor, .... 


1 




Civil engineer, 


1 


~ 


Laborer 


21 




lawyer, .... 


1 




Laundry, 




3 


Electrotyper, . 


2 




Leather worker. 


3 




Rodman, 


2 




Letter carrier, 


2 




Fireman, 


1 




Longshoreman, 






Missionary, 






Machinist, 


20 




Florist, .... 






Mechanic, 


1 




Bellboy, 






Milliner, .... 


~ 


3 


Lady's maid, . 




1 


Motorman, 


1 


— 


Cutter 


2 




No work. 


1 


4 


Press feeder, . 






Nursemaid, 




3 


Demonstrator, 




2 


Nurse, trained. 


1 


8 


Errand boy, . 




— 


Packer 


4 


1 


Glassworker, . 






Painter, .... 


6 


~ 


Baker, .... 


1 




Pedler 


4 




Decorator, 


1 




Photographer, 


2 




Lithographer, 


2 




Policeman, 


^ 




Tobacco stripper, . 




1 


Polisher, .... 


2 




Roofer, .... 


1 




Porter, .... 






General work. 


2 


1 


Printer 


7 




Artist, .... 


1 




Sailor 


3 




Attendant, 


1 


1 


Salespeople, 


12 


6 


Barber, .... 


3 


" 


Seamstress, 


~ 


2 


Bartender, 


2 




Shipper, .... 


1 




Blacksmith, . 


2 




Stenographer, 


~ 


11 


Bookbinder, . 


1 




Stonecutter, . 


3 




Bookkeeper, , 


8 


5 


Student, .... 


32 


16 


Brakeman, 


1 




Tailor 


9 




Butcher, .... 


2 




Teacher, school, 


~ 


3 


Cabinet maker. 


1 




Teamster, 


13 




Carpenter, 


7 




Telephone operator. 




8 


Chauffem-, 






Tinsmith, 


1 




Cigar maker, . 






Toolmaker, 


4 




Clerk 


46 


17 


Waiter, .... 


6 


8 


Conductor, street railway. 


5 




Manicurist, 




2 


Cook 




1 


Plumber, 


5 




Coppersmith, . 


1 




Chemist, 


1 


i 


Totals, 


396 


366 



1910.1 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



113 



o o o 

'^lox :s g 2 * 



C4 O C4 



3C « O 







5 \2 


11 

o 












« 
to 




5 ■ ■ 


i 






t- 

eo 


00 


O 1 

o 


























p: 

•< 






X 




X i 1 






1 o 









a 
z 

I ■< 

! s 

cs 

' § 



o » 2 5 
•luaO jaj j !! 2 1^ 



r< =; — 























2 " 




























z 












a 
























z 


































X 1 1 















• I 



s s > = 

a 5 £ -~ 

a 2 - 

a c = 

< < ^ ■z 



-3 

g 



3 * 
o 



114 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 11. — Comparison of Percentages since the Adoption of National 
Association Classification. 



Incipient Cases. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


Apparently cured, 


39.2 


50.4 


56.1 


33.0 


61.57 


21.84 


Arrested 


46.7 


40.1 


26.8 


46.5 


25.61 


40.51 


Improved, 


12.0 


8.9 , 


16.3 


17.3 


10.83 


28.61 


Not improved 


2.0 


.6 


.7 


3.0 


1.97 


9.03 



Table 12. — Deaths, Duration of Tuberculosis, Length of Stay in 
Sanatorium, and Cause of Death. 



Duration. 


Length of Residence. 


Cause of Death. 


2 years. 


16 days, .... 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


5 years, 


1 month, 10 days. 


Pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis. 


8 months. 


1 month, 8 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


4 months, 


1 month, 7 days. 


Miliary tuberculosis. 


9 years. 


8 months, 5 days, 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


6 months. 




Miliary tuberculosis. 


4 months, 


4 months, 14 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


10 months, 


4 months, 15 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


6 months, 


1 month, 21 days. 


Tubercular meningitis. 


2 months. 


2 months, .... 


Mitral regurgitation and pulmonary 


tuberculosis. 


3 months. 


2 months, 18 days, 


Uremia. 


1 year, .... 


3 months, 26 days, 


Intestinal perforation and peritonitis. 



1910.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 




Public Document 



No. 77 



FIFTH AJ^^NUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Teustees of Massachusetts Hospitals 
FOE Consumptives. 



[N^OVEMBER 30, 1911. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT <^ POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 
1912. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Trustees, 5 

Report of Trustees, 7 

Appendix, 18 

Report of the North Reading State Sanatorium, ... 20 

Report of the Lakeville State Sanatorium, .... 39 

Report of the Westfield State Sanatorium, . . . . 61 

Report of the Rutland State Sanatorium, .... 79 



TRUSTEES. 



Arthur T. Cabot, M.D., Chairman, 

Arthur Drinkwater. Sylvia B. Knowlton. 

George A. Dunn. William D. McFee, M.D. 

Albert C. Getchell, M.D. Daniel L. Prendergast. 

John B. Hawes, 2d, M.D., Secretary. 



3 Joy Street, Boston. 



®l)e CommontDcaltl) of itla00a£l)U0ett0. 



EEPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF MASSACHUSETTS 
HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



To His Excellency the Governor of the Commonwealth and to the 
Honorable Council. 

In accordance with, the act establishing this Board (chapter 
474, Acts of 1907) we submit the following report: — 

In June, 1910, the term of office of Mr. William C. Godfrey 
of Indian Orchard expired. Governor Foss appointed Mr. 
Daniel L. Prendergast of Brookline to fill the vacancy thus 
created. Aside from this there have been no changes in the 
personnel of the Board. 

The four institutions under the control of this Board — the 
sanatoria at Kutland, i^'orth Reading, Lakeville and Westfield 
— have passed an active and successful year. At the three new 
sanatoria, although originally planned for only 150 patients, by 
means of tents, shacks, etc., the capacity has been so increased 
as to bring the daily average of patients to about 160. The 
daily average of patients at Rutland State Sanatorium has re- 
mained the same, 345. 

The waiting list for these institutions, especially for men, is 
still a long one. There are now upon this list over 150 men 
and 75 women. By far the greater number of these are in the 
advanced stages of the disease. In the fall and winter months 
it is necessary for a man to wait at least two months after filing 
his application, and a woman at least one month, before his or 
her name is reached upon the list. This makes it particularly 
desirable to increase the number of beds for advanced cases at 
the sanatoria so as to shorten this list. 



8 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 



In the opinion of the Board it would not be wise to increase 
the capacity of the sanatorinm at Rutland at the present time, 
but at the three other sanatoria the kitchen and the power 
plants could take care of more patients, so that a small outlay 
for a ward building at the jSTorth Reading, Lakeville and West- 
field sanatoria would go far towards accommodating the pa- 
tients on the waiting list who are urgently in need of sanato- 
rium treatment. Their care would add but little to the burden 
of the State. 

The Board would recommend, therefore, that suitable appro- 
priation be made for an additional ward building at the Xorth 
Reading, Lakeville and Westfield State sanatoria. 

An interesting and encouraging feature of the work is the 
increased length of stay of patients at the three new sanatoria. 
In our last report we stated that the average length of stay of 
patients at these institutions was about three months. This 
has so increased that the average length of stay during the past 
year has been nearer one hundred and fifty days, or five months. 
The reasons for this are twofold : first, the sanatoria are being 
made more attractive; walks have been laid out, gardens 
planted, and fruit trees, shrubs, vines and fiowers set out, 
while in the institutions themselves entertainments of various 
kinds have been given, all of which tend to make the life there 
more pleasant. In the second place, the public at large, as 
well as the medical profession, have become more and more 
alive to the value of sanatorium treatment, and have begun to 
appreciate the importance of isolating and caring for the ad- 
vanced consumptive so as to prevent the further spread of the 
disease. 

Regulatto??" of Wokk. 
In our last report we called attention to the importance of 
suitable employment in the way of work of some kind as a part 
of the treatment for curable patients. That this is now a gen- 
erally accepted idea is shown by the fact that work is prescribed 
as a therapeutic measure in every properly conducted tubercu- 
losis sanatorium in this country and abroad. There was marked 
opposition on the part of patients and their friends in carrying 
out this plan at first. By patience, perseverance and tact on 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 



9 



the part of the superintendents, assistant physicians and nurses, 
this is being overcome, and at present at all of the State sana- 
toria every patient whose physical condition allows him to do 
so is expected to perform a measured amount of work selected 
according to his individual needs. The patients are beginning 
to recognize the importance of this part of their treatment and 
to realize that only in this way can they reach a degree of 
vigor which will keep them well after they return to their homes 
and their usual occupations. 

Ex-PATIEXTS ox THE PaY RoLL. 

In our last report we called attention to the number of ex- 
patients accepted as employees at the various sanatoria. The 
Board has continued this policy and has instructed the super- 
intendents to be on the wat<!h for capable and industrious pa- 
tients in whom the disease has been cured or apparently 
arrested, and to place them upon the pay rolls of the institu- 
tions after their discharge as patients. The number of ex- 
patients thus employed has steadily increased during the past 
year, and is a gratifying evidence of the success of the sana- 
torium treatment. The sanatoria thus perform the double func- 
tion of curing the patients and afterwards keeping them- well. 
Our experience with these ex-patients as employees has been 
very satisfactory, and accords with that of sanatoria elsewhere 
in which this plan has been tried. 

The Board, realizing that there are some patients referred 
by homoeopathic physicians who might wish homoeopathic treat- 
ment, have endeavored to procure a homoeopathic physician for 
the staff of each of the State sanatoria. This is already accom- 
plished at Rutland and Xorth Reading, and as soon as suitable 
candidates can be found, and vacancies occur, we hope to have 
a homoeopathic physician at each of these hospitals. 

Acting under the subsidy bill (chapter 597, Acts of 1911) 
this Board has had examination made of municipal hospitals 
in Boston, Lawrence, Salem, Somerville and Westfield. 

All of these hospitals, except that at Salem, were approved. 

Stimulated by the above legislation the cities of Brockton, 
Cambridge, Fall River, Fitchburg, Haverhill, Holyoke, Lynn, 
^sTewburyport, Pittsfield, Springfield, Waltham and Worcester 



10 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 



have plans for hospitals under way and in some cases nearing 
completion. 

Xew Bedford has an excellent private hospital where citv 
cases are cared for, their hoard being paid by the city. 

Other cities, which have found that it would be advantageous 
to provide for their city cases in private hospitals, have made 
inquiry as to whether they can properly apply for this subsidy 
for patients thus cared for at their expense. 

It would seem wise and just to so amend the subsidy act as 
to make it cover such cases provided for by a city in a hospital 
that met the approval of this Board. 

The examination of the sputum of patients for whom the sub- 
sidy is claimed is provided for in laboratories approved by this 
Board. When such laboratories are not available in the neigh- 
borhood of the hospital the sputum is sent to the laboratory of 
the State Board of Health. 

The Auditor's office requires the certification by this Board 
of the financial condition of the patients for whom the subsidy 
is asked. An agent has been employed to investigate the cir- 
cumstances of each case. His salary and expenses are paid 
out of the $5,000 appropriated by the last Legislature for carry- 
ing out the purposes of this subsidy act. 

As other hospitals are completed in different parts of the 
State, and the number of cases to be looked up increases, it will 
be necessary to employ one or more examiners for this purpose. 
In our estimate for the coming year we have asked for $5,000 
for this purpose, and this has been approved by the State Board 
of Charity. 

Besides the subsidy bill an act (chapter 576, Acts of 1911) 
requiring boards of health of cities and towns to establish dis- 
pensaries for the examination and care of tuberculosis patients 
was enacted by the last Legislature. 

Also an act (chapter 613, Acts of 1911) was passed requiring 
the boards of health of cities and towns to build a hospital, or 
to provide suitable quarters, for patients with contagious dis- 
eases, including tuberculosis. 

Copies of these bills (which will be found in the Appendix 
to this report) have been sent to the boards of health of cities 
and towns of over 10,000 inhabitants. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 11 



Educatioxal Wokk. 

During the past year the educational work of the Board has 
steadily increased. As in the past, bulletins have been sent out 
every two weeks to nearly 200 newspapers in the State. Many 
letters touching on every phase of the tuberculosis question 
have been written to physicians, patients and their friends 
and anti-tuberculosis workers, not only in Massachusetts but 
all over the country. The office of the Board has become an 
information bureau to which patients, physicians and others 
are constantly coming to interview the secretary of the Board 
in regard to the sanatoria and other questions connected with 
the work. Literature in the way of reports, reprints, instruc- 
tive pamphlets, pay-envelope cards, etc., are kept on hand for 
distribution. Members of the Board, the four superintendents - 
and the secretary, have given lectures to large numbers of peo- 
ple on the general subject of tuberculosis, and the four superin- 
tendents have given many informal talks on this subject to their 
patients. The Journal of the State sanatoria, a monthly paper 
published at the Rutland State Sanatorium, in addition to 
giving items of news from the four sanatoria, contains numer- 
ous articles of interest and value not only to patients but to 
their friends and to the public at large. This paper is dis- 
tributed to the patients, anti-tuberculosis associations, physicians 
and to many others who have asked that their names be put upon 
the mailing list. 

The school tuberculosis exhibits mentioned in our last report 
have been used in the public schools of various cities and towns 
throughout the State. Below, in tabulated form, will be found 
the exact location of each exhibit : — 

School Tuberculosis Exhibits. 

Loaned. Bought. 



Boston, city of 5 5 

Boston Association for Relief and Control of Tuber- 
culosis, - 1 

Braintree, 1 - 

Brookline Anti-Tuberculosis Association, ... - 1 

Canton, - 1 

Chelsea, - 1 

Chicopee, 1 - 



12 HOSPIT.\LS FOR COXSOIPTRTS. [Dec. 

Loaned. Bonghi . 

Clinton - 1 

Fitchburg, - i 

Gardner. 1 

Great Barrington. 1 

HaTcriiill, - 1 

Holyoke, 1 

Lawrence. 1 - 

LowelL 1 - 

Lynn, 1 

Itfiddleborongh. 1 - 

Xortiiampton 1 - 

Pittsfield, - 1 

Springfield, 1 - 

Westfield, 1 

Worcester, 1 



In co-operation with the Xational Tnbercnlosis Association 
and the Xational BiU Posting Association, large posters in re- 
gard to tnbercnlosisj its prevention and cure, were placed in 
prominent places in every large city in this State for a period of 
several weeks dnring the past year. 

La many other ways a knowledge of tnbercnlosis and its 
prevention, and of proper hygiene in general, has been spread 
ahroad. 

The a i-ve-described work of onr Board makes it plain that it 
:= i -1 -ible for a set of hnsy men to visit the sanatoria in the 
— : :i_r : r=cribed by section 11. chapter 474, Acts of 1907. 

I: 1: iTant. therefore, that the trustees should have the 
assistance in the above work of a competent medical man, who 
" his whole time to it. Moreover, the work of the 

-an : :^ li'osely connected with the anti-tuberculosis work 
in many cities and towns, and it is of great importance that the 
closest co-opera:::n azii :ng all agencies working against tuber- 
culosis in the S" h i be fostered and directed. 

It is most prqir: hi? direction and fostering care should 

be exerted by the Tr : Ttt : Hospitals for Consumptives, who 
have diarge of the sanatoria which must he the backbone of any 
system of State control 

After long study and consideration of the work now in our 
hands, and with the realization of the need of a uniform plan 
and system patiently and intelligently adhered to, we feel that 
it is most imperative that onr Board shall have an exeontive 



1911.] 



FOLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



13 



secretary, who to a medical training unites a capacity for ad- 
ministration. Such a secretary would carry on the traditions 
of the work of a Board the personnel of which is always liahle 
to change. He would have time and opportunity to master the 
details of our work, would keep the trustees constantly in- 
formed, and could pursue such investigations as the Board 
might direct in regard to the management of other sanatoria 
from which we might learn facts important to the management 
of our own. Such a man, we believe, would effect economies 
which would many times offset his salary. More important 
than this, however, he would enable us to carry on the work 
against tuberculosis in such a manner as to get the best results 
from all the measures the State is putting in operation. 

From the above consideration it seems clear that this Board 
should have at its disposal a medical health officer of high class, 
who should have a salary of at least $5,000. TVe respectfully 
ask permission to seek out and engage a man fitted for these 
duties. 

DlSBUESEMZyXS. 



Appropriation $5,100 00 

Salary of secretary, $2,000 00 

Salary of stenographer 1.000 00 

Bent of offices, 800 00 

Press cUppings, 60 00 

Expenses of trustees, 3S9 65 

Telephone, 67 42 

Electric lighting 12 00 

Extra clerical assistance. ..... 153 75 

Stationery, office supplies, printing, etc.. . 614 92 

$5,097 74 



The estimates for the maintenance of this office for the com- 
ing year, all of which have been approved by the State Board 
of Charity, are as follows : — 



Salary of seeretaiy, $2,000 00 

Salary of stenographer and eleik 1.000 00 

Extra clerical service, 500 00 

Travel and necessary expenses of trostees, including 

printing rei)ort, office expenses, etc 2,670 00 



Carrjing out purposes of chapter 597, Acts of 1911. . 5.000 00 



$11,170 00 



14 HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTRTS. [Dec. 



XoETH Readixct State SAXATOEir:M. 

The Xorth Reading State Sanatorium, which was opened 
Sept. 22, 1909, has now been in operation over two years. 
Extra beds have been provided so that the average number of 
patients is about 160, and it is planned to increase this number 
to 175 during the next year. This is particularly neces- 
sary as the waiting list for this institution is larger thau that 
for any other and is constantly increasing. 

At this institution cement walks have l)een laid out, an exten- 
sive orchard of fruit trees has been planted, an excellent vege- 
table garden has been developed, the trees trimmed, and in 
many ways the grounds have been made much more attractive 
and pleasant. 

The estimates for the coming year, all of which have l3een 
approved by the State Board of Charity, are as follows : — 



Salaries and wages. $30,336 00 

Food. 29.590 00 

Clothing and material. 21S 00 

Furnishings, 2,000 00 

Heat. Hght and power. 4.500 00 

Repairs and improvements 5.S00 00 

Farm, stable and gi'omids. 3.000 00 

Miscellaneous. ......... 6.066 00 



$S1,510 00 

Lakzvtlle State Sax-atoeium. 

The Lakeville State Sanatorium has been kept full during 
the past year with an average number of patients of about 160. 
It is planned to increase this mimber to 175 during the next 
year. The grotmds have been greatly improved and made at- 
tractive with nimierous fruit trees, shrubs and flowers. 

At this institution, owing to the difficulty in obtaining a 
proper milk supply from local producers, the advisability of 
establishing a dairy farm in connection with this institution has 
been brought tip. This matter is now under consideration by 
the Board. 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 



15 



The estimates for the coming year, all of which have been 
approved by the State Board of Charity, are as follows : — 



Salaries, wages and labor, . 

Food, 

Clothing and material, 

Furnishings, 

Heat. Ught and power. 

Repairs and improvements, 

Faim, stable and gi-ounds. 

Miscellaneous, 



For special appropriations : — 
Shack for 20 patients, .... 
Duplicate pump and motor. 
Land and equipment for dau-y : — 
Land, about 50 acres (with 
buildings now insured for 
$2,600 K . . . .$5,000 00 
Thirty cows and dairy ap- 
paratus, 3,000 00 

Remodeling bam, water sup- 
ply, etc., .... 2,000 00 



$33,400 00 
30.500 00 
500 00 
3.200 00 
5.000 00 
3.500 00 
3,500 00 
7,000 00 



•1,800 00 
600 00 



$86,600 00 



10.000 00 



$12,400 00 



Westfield State Saxatoeium. 

The Westfield State Sanatorium has been kept full during 
the past year. At times the waiting list of patients, women 
especially, from the western part of the State, has not been 
large enough to fill the vacancies. Patients have therefore been 
sent there from the east. 

The water supply for this institution is still in danger of 
pollution from an adjoining farm. As stated in earlier reports, 
an appropriation for the purchase of this farm was asked while 
there was yet power of eminent domain, in order to secure it 
at a reasonable figure. The period during which this farm 
could have been thus secured has expired, but the danger of 
pollution from this source, according to analyses from the State 
Board of Health, remains the same. The Board, therefore, has 
requested a special appropriation to purchase this property. 



16 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUIMPTIVES. [Dec. 



The estimates for the coming year, all of which have been 
approved by the State Board of Charity, are as follows : — 



Salaries, wages and labor, . 

Food, 

Clothing and material, 

Furnishing"s, 

Heat, light and power, 

Repairs and improvements, 

FaiTH, stable and grounds, . 

Miscellaneous, 



For special appropriations : — 
Purchase of adjacent farm, known as the 
Pignatare property, consisting of 40 
acres of land and buildings, . 
Construction of a cow stable, . 
Purchase of cows, 



p32,000 00 

32,000 00 

500 00 

2,500 00 

5,000 00 

3,500 00 

3,500 00 

8,000 00 



$3,500 00 
2,000 00 
1,500 00 



$87,000 00 



$7,000 00 



RuTLAivD State SA]S"ATORiu:^r. 

The Rutland State Sanatorium has been kept full during 
the past year; This institution has been under the control of 
this Board since the opening of the last of the three new State . 
sanatoria, in February, 1910. Reference has been made earlier 
in this report to the efforts of the Board to reserve it for incip- 
ient and favorable cases. 

The estimates for the following year, all of which have been 
approved by the State Board of Charity, are as follows : • — 



Salaries, wages and labor, 
Food, .... 
Clothing and material, 
Furnishings, 
Heat, light and power, 
Eepairs and improvements, 
FaiTQ, stable and grounds. 
Miscellaneous, 



$63,000 00 

72,000 00 

100 00 

6,900 00 

13,000 00 

4,000 00 

8,000 00 

14,000 00 



$181,000 00 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



17 



For special appropriations : — 

Horse barn, $8,950 00 

New hydrant near nurses' home, and fire 

extinguisher, 400 00 

Rebuilding road through sanatorium 

grounds, 1,400 00 

Addition to carpenter shop, . . . 700 00 

Wood and iron working machinery, . . 500 00 

$11,950 00 



Respectfully submitted, 



ARTHUR T. CABOT. 
ARTHUR DRINKWATER. 
GEORGE A. DUNK 
ALBERT C. GETCHELL. 
SYLVIA B. KNOWLTON. 
WILLIAM D. McEEE. 
DANIEL L. PRENDERGAST. 



IS HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 



Appendix. 



ACTS RELATING TO TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITALS. 



Acts of 1911, Chapter 576. 

Ax Act to provide for the IMaintenance of Tuberculosis Dis- 
pensaries IX Cities axd Towxs of Tex Thousand Ixhabitaxts 
OR Over. 

Every city and every town containing a population of ten thousand 
or more, as determined by the latest United States census, shall estab- 
lish and maintain within its limits a dispensary for the discovery, 
treatment, and supervision of needy persons resident within its limits 
and afflicted with tuberculosis, unless there already exists in such 
city or town a dispensary which is satisfactory to the state board of 
health. The said dispensaries shall be subject to the regulations of 
the boards of health of the cities or towns in which they are respec- 
tively situated. A city or town subject to the provisions of this act 
which upon the request of the state board of health, refuses or neglects 
to comply with the provisions hereof, shall forfeit not more than 
five hundred dollars for every such refusal or neglect. [Approved June 
22, 1911. 

Acts of 1911, Chapter .597. 

Ax Act to excourage axd promote the Buildixg axd Use of Tuber- 
culosis Hospitals ix Cities axd Towxs. 

Sectiox 1. Every city or town which establishes and maintains a 
tuberculosis hospital shall be entitled to receive from the commonwealth 
a subsidy of five dollars per week for each patient who is unable 
to pay for his support, or whose kindred bound by law to maintain 
him are unable to pay for the same, but the city or town shall not be- 
come entitled to this subsidy unless, upon examination authorized by 
the trustees of hospitals for consumptives, the sputum of such patients 
be found to contain bacilli of tuberculosis, and unless the hospital 
be subject to the inspection of, and be approved by, said trustees. 

Sectiox 2. Said trustees of hospitals for consumptives shall certify 
in the case of each hospital approved by them as provided in the 
preceding section the nmnber of patients for whom the city or town is 
entitled to the subsidy, and upon such certification the subsidy shall be 
paid from the treasury of the commonwealth in the same manner in 
which other claims against the commonwealth are paid. 

Sectiox 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 



19 



Acts of 1911, Ch^vpter 613. 
An Act relative to the ^Maixtexance of Isolation Hospitals by 
Cities axd Towns. 
Section 1. Chapter seventy-five of the Revised Laws is hereby 
amended by striking out section thirty-five and inserting in place 
thereof the following : — Section 35. Each city and town shall estab- 
lish and constantly maintain within its limits one or more isolation 
hospitals for the reception of persons having diseases dangerous to 
the public health as defined by the state board of health, including a 
tuberculosis hospital or tuberculosis wards. Plans for the construc- 
tion of such hospitals shall be approved by the state board of health, 
and said hospitals shall be inspected by the state board of health or by 
its accredited agent, at least twice in every year. But if, in the 
opinion of the state board of health, two or more adjoining towns 
or a city and contigTious towns can advantageously establish and main- 
tain such hospitals in common, the authorities of said towns or of 
such cities and contiguous towns may enter into such agreements as may 
be necessary for the establishment and maintenance of the same. Any 
city or town which upon the request of the state board of health re- 
fuses or neglects to comply with the provisions of this section shall 
forfeit not less than five hundred dollars for every such refusal or 
neglect. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Approved 
June 30, 1911. 



20 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



NOETH READING STATE SANATORIUM. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

CARL C. McCORISON, M.D., . . Superintendent and Physician. 
NEWELL B. BURNS, M.D., Assistant Superintendent and Physician. 
HARRY S. NEWHART, M.D.,, .... Assistant Physician. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 



21 



REPORT OF THE SUPERIXTEXDEXT. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives, 3 Joy Street, Boston, 

Mass. 

Ladies axd Gextleimex : — I have the honor of presenting 
to you the report of the Xorth Reading State Sanatorium for 
the year ending Xov. 30, 1911. 

The records show that during the year 460 patients have 
been treated and that 302 have been admitted. The lowest daily 
census was 153^ and the highest 161. The daily average num- 
ber of patients was 158.23, which is 10.23 more than that of the 
preceding year. 

There have been admitted, during the year, 14 incipient, 65 
moderately advanced, 221 advanced cases and 2 not tubercu- 
lous. Thirty-one patients were removed against advice, and of 
this number 17 had remained in the sanatorium one week or 
less. There has been a daily average of 71 bed cases, approxi- 
mately 45 per cent, of the daily population, — an increase of 5 
per cent, over that of last year. The greater number of these 
bed cases have been in the far advanced stages of the disease, 
although a few have required bed treatment only a short time, 
due to the frequent setbacks incident to the disease. 

Of the 302 cases admitted, 243 were inside workers, and 223 
were admitted from cities and towns having a population of 
25,000 or more. 

The average duration of residence in the sanatorium was one 
hundred and sixty-seven days, as opposed to sixty-five for the 
preceding year ; the longest residence of any one person was 
seven hundred and thirty-four days, and the shortest, one day. 

Of the patients discharged during the year, 155 have gained 
in weight, the total gain being 1,614 pounds and the average 
gain 10.4 pounds ; 8 patients have remained stationary, 42 have 
lost, 31 were not considered (duration in the sanatorium being 
less than one week) and 64 patients have died. Eifty-one pa- 
tients have been discharged arrested, 91 were improved, 54 



22 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



were progressive, 64 have died, 38 were not considered (dura- 
tion of stay being less than one month) and 2 were not tuber- 
culous. The average age was 31.01 years. One hundred and 
fifty-two were foreign born and 90 were American born, but of 
foreign parentage. 

One hundred and thirty-one have been supported from pri- 
vate funds, 177 cases by cities and tomis, 59 cases entirely by 
the State, and 26 private cases have later become either town 
or State charges. There were remaining, ^^^ovember 30, 22 pri- 
vate cases, 61 city or town cases, 35 State cases and 42 unknown 
cases. 

The total cost for maintenance for the year ending ISTov. 30, 
1911, was $78,999.93; deducting $601.52, collected from mis- 
cellaneous sources, leaves a net amount expended for mainte- 
nance of $78,398.41. The average per capita cost per week 
is $9.50. There has been collected from private patients 
$6,625.92, and from cities and towns, $15,u28.70. Further 
details will be found in succeeding pages of this report. 

Our patients are slowly beginning to realize that a certain 
amount of well-regulated exercise, in the form of light occupa- 
tion, is a most valuable part of the treatment, and the fact that 
a few of the patients have been discharged and taken on as 
regular employees has acted as a stimulus to the others. At 
the present time all of the mending, hemming of towels and 
bed linen is being done by the female patients, and they are tak- 
ing an active part in the housekeeping of various parts of the 
institution, including waiting on table in the patients' dining 
room. A great deal of work is being done by our male pa- 
tients, such as painting, light carpentering, care of poultry, 
ward work, waiting on table and picking up about the grounds. 

Of course many of our patients are unfit to perform the 
lightest of duties, consequently the amount of work accom- 
plished depends wholly upon the physical condition of the whole 
at any given time. 

We have recently taken up the work of following up cases 
which have been discharged from the sanatorium, one year or 
more. Thus far the work has been rather discouraging. Out 
of 235 letters sent out to ex-patients, only 91 have been heard 
from, and of these 43 have been reported as dead. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 23 

I:mprovemexts. 

Additional concrete walks have been built and cement floors 
laid in the pavilions' basements. Repairs and additions to the 
bam have been completed. The new piggery and hennery have 
been built. The hospital wards, lavatories, serving rooms, din- 
ing rooms and kitchen, and all rooms on the office floor of the 
administration building have been painted, also trimmings on 
all the buildings except the farmhouse. A concrete platform, 
with undergi'ound garbage receivers, and a catch basin draining 
directly into the sewer, has been placed at the side of the 
kitchen entrance. The new engine, generator and incinerator, 
has been installed. One hundred apple trees and 4.000 straw- 
berry plants have been set out. Electric lights have been placed 
along the road leading from the administration building to the 
farmhouse, and lights installed in farmhouse and barn. Water 
has been carried to farmhouse, stable and piggery. A combi- 
nation sterilizer and washing machine has been installed in 
the laundry. A new pump with a capacity of 125 gallons per 
minute has been installed, and addition made to pump house to 
accommodate same.- A storm vestibule has been built over the 
east entrance of the patients' dining room. 

A short driveway has been built on the north side of the 
buildings on the men's side^ and the road leading from the 
administration building to the farmhouse rebuilt. A small 
camp for the use of ex-patient employees is under construction, 
and will probably be completed by the middle of the winter. 
The work on the sewerage purification is nearly completed. A 
motor-driven ice-cream freezer has been purchased and is about 
to be installed. Gutters have also been purchased for the vari- 
ous buildings. A large cesspool has been placed in the rear of 
the female hospital to take care of the excess surface water 
which accumulates there during the late winter and early spring. 

Staff. 

Dr. E. B. Emerson, superintendent and resident physician, 
resigned Oct. 1, 1911, to accept a position at the Bridgewater 
State Farm as medical director. Dr. A. P. Janes resigned 



24 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



February 17 to accept a position at the Lakeville State Sana- 
torium as first assistant. Dr. IsT. B. Burns was appointed sec- 
ond assistant, succeeding Dr. Janes. Dr. C. C. McCorison 
was appointed superintendent, succeeding Dr. Emerson, Oct. 
1, Dr. 1^. B.. Burns being appointed first assistant, and Dr. 
H. S. l^ewhart, of the Westborough State Hospital, appointed 
second assistant, to succeed Dr. Burns. Miss Susan E. Haynes 
has been appointed treasurer, the appointment taking eifect 
^sTov. 20, 1911. 

Farm axd Gaedexs. 
There have been almost 4 acres under cultivation the past 
year, and the productiveness has been somewhat greater than 
previous years. Three additional acres have been broken for 
future cultivation. 

Recommexdatiojs^s. 
The sum of $82,110 will be required for the maintenance of 
the sanatorium in the ensuing year. 

AcKIs^OWLEDGMENTS. 

I wish to express our thanks to the Rev. Father Walsh and 
the Rev. F. A. Jenkins, who have officiated at the religious 
services and responded to the calls of the sick in the hospital 
wards. I wish to express my thanks for the many gifts of 
books, magazines, periodicals, etc., presented to the sanatorium. 
I especially wish to thank Miss Delight W. Hall of Andover, 
and the Church of the Epiphany of Winchester, for their many 
gifts of books and periodicals ; Mrs. E. W. Emerson of Concord 
for her contributions of clothing; Mr. Bailey of Reading for 
flowers and ice cream and the King-'s Daughters of Andover for 
a Christmas box for the male patients. 

I wish to thank the officers, employees, and others who have 
helped to lighten my responsibilities during my two months 
of administration. I wish to express to the trustees my deep- 
est appreciation for their kindness and helpfulness which they 
have extended to me. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CARL C. McCORISOI^, 

Superintendent. 

Nov. 30, 1911. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



25 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



To the Trustees North Beading State Sanatorium. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1911 : — 



Cash Account. 



Balance Dec 1, 1910, 



$352 03 



Receipts. 



Institution Receipts 
Board of inmates: — 
Private, 

Cities and towns, 



Sales: 



$6,625 92 
15,028 70 



S4 50 
31 65 
32 
73 80 
491 25 



Food, 

Clothing and materials. 
Furnishings, 

Repairs and improvements. 
Miscellaneous, 



Miscellaneous receipts: — 

Interest on bank balances. 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance of 1910 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber, 30, §7,000, less returned, $2,711.81), . 

Approved schedules of 1911, . $69,671 71 

Less returned, ... 2 07 



$21,654 62 



601 52 



101 17 



$5,245 81 
4,288 19 

69,669 64 



22,357 31 



Special appropriations. 



79,203 64 
7,053 70 



Total, 



$108,966 68 



26 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, . . . S22,3o7 31 

Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1910, . . So, 597 84 

Eleven months' schedules, 1911, . . . 69,669 64 

November advances, ..... 4,288 19 

79,oo5 67 



Total, 



Maintenance. 



Appropriation, . 

Expenses (as analyzed below) , 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 
Analysis of Expenses. 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration. 
Medical service, . 
Ward service (male), . 
Ward service (female). 
Repairs and improvements, 
Farm, stable and grounds. 



Special appropriations: — 
Approved schedules, 



Food: — 
Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc.. 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, . 

Fruit (dried and fresh), 

Meats, 

Milk, 

Molasses and syrup, 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 

Vegetables, 

Sundries, 



cocoa, 



7,053 70 



. S108,966 68 



S79,000 00 
78,999 93 



SO 07 



S12,431 02 

4,492 97 

1,351 82 

5,169 09 

1,675 57 

3,829 67 
S28,950 14 



$2,102 07 
83 47 
55 04 
54 58 
127 03 
157 47 
3,434 15 
505 40 
660 77 
1,651 12 
9,177 10 
5,275 48 
26 69 
849 89 
348 26 
1,852 20 
741 20 
27,101 92 



Clothing and materials: — 

Boots, shoes and rubbers, .... S16 57 

Clothing, 301 83 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, . 64 00 

Hats and caps, ...... 2 70 

385 10 



Amount carried forward, 



856,437 16. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



27 



Amount brought forward. 



Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., . . . $1,203 15 

Brushes, brooms, 223 97 

Carpets, rugs, etc., ..... 171 30 

Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . . . 537 70 

Furniture and upholstery, .... 617 44 

Kitchen furnishings, . . . . . 693 47 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., . . 251 99 

Sundries 132 21 



Heat, light and power : — 

Coal, ' . . $3,067 40 

Freight on coal, 579 88 

Oil, ... .... 147 95 

Sundries 46 10 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Brick, $69 30 

Cement, lime and plaster, .... 174 83 

Doors, sashes, etc., ..... 41 25 

Electrical work and supplies, . . . 765 88 

Hardware 316 53 

Lumber 852 92 

Machinery, etc 132 00 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., ..... 550 30 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies, . . .1,573 16 

Sundries 1,035 59 



Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Blacksmith and supplies, .... $92 31 

Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, . . 275 70 

Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., . . . 856 92 

Hay, grain, etc., 852 07 

Harnesses and repairs, .... 38 45 

Other live stock, 126 00 

Tools, farm machines, etc., .... 296 96 

Sundries, 642 23 



Miscellaneous : — 



Books, periodicals, etc., .... 


$67 


33 


Chapel services and entertainments, 


778 


93 


Freight, expressage and transportation, . 


681 


12 


Funeral expenses, ..... 


66 


00 


Ice, ........ 


7 


65 


Medicines and hospital supplies, . 


1,716 


98 


Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra). 


15 


00 


Postage, ....... 


161 


20 


Printing and printing supplies. 


375 


25 


Soap and laundry supplies, .... 


687 


46 


Stationery and office supplies. 


294 


06 



$56,437 16 



3,831 23 



3,841 33 



5,511 76 



3,180 64 



Amounts carried forward, 



$4,850 98 $72,802 12 



28 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, .... S4,850 98 872,802 12 

Miscellaneous — Con. 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . , 231 89 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 189 18 

Tobacco, 5 45 

Cuspidor supplies, ..... 668 95 

Sundries, 251 36 

6,197 81 

Total expenses for maintenance, ..... 878,999 93 

Special Appropriations. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1910, 87,006 36 

Appropriations for fiscal j-ear, ....... 3,537 75 



Total, 810,544 11 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), 87,053 70 

Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . 08 

7,053 78 

Balance Nov. 30, 1911, 83,490 33 

• 

Resources axd Liabilities. 
Resources. 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money), 84,288 19 
Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 

November, 1911, schedule, .... 5,042 10 

89,330 29 

Liabilities. 

Schedule of November bills, 89,330 29 



Per Capita. 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 158.23. 

Total cost for maintenance, 878,999.93. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of 89.575. 

Receipts from sales, 8601.52. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of 80.072. 

All other institution receipts, 821,755.79. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of 82,636. 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



29 



^2 



•t3 



I! 



1 I I 



o 



O CO 
C2 »0 



O lO O <M O O 
O O O O (M 

O O 05 O (M 
O CO O O O lO 

(m" ccTco'^i-r 



O ^ CO (N O O !>. 
O 00 rfi O ^ (M 

O Tt< T-H O (M l:^ 
O CO <M 00 O O lO 
lO CO O o 



O o o o o o 
o o o o o o 

o o o o o o 
O CO o o o o o 

Ci" (N*'co'T-rT-rco' 



Tf (/f"^ 

. o 

a.t^ a a a a 

^ o2 ^ 

^ ^ ^ ^ j3 

« c3 o o o o o 

. G ^ ^ ^ 

O g O O O O ^ 

O >iC5 C5 C5 05 O 

1— I '— I 1— I 1— I 1— I 1— I 

02 32 M M CC 02 
s-= C -tJ -1-3 -(-=> -1^ 
O ^ O O O O O 

<^ CQ <i <i1 <1 <K 



Si5 



c o 



^ 1^ s I g 

s Is ^1 

•2 S3 o «^ f 
-t^-^jt; o G c3 6 



a 



Oh 



I! 
II 



30 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



VALUATION. 



Statement of Present Value of All Personal Property as per Inventory 
taken Nov. 30, 1911, at North Reading State Sanatorium. 



Items. 


Present Value. 


Food 


S3, 380 09 




449 28 




18,610 23 


Heat, light and power 


14,525 90 




6,427 09 


Farm, stable and grounds, 


5.086 60 


Miscellaneous 


3,500 57 


Grand total 


§51,979 76 


Total valuation of real estate: — 






S6,765 50 




73,175 00 




879,940 50 



PRODUCTS OF FARM AND GARDENS. 



5 bushels shell beans. 

36 bushels string beans. 

35 bushels beets. 
880 dozen ears sweet corn. 
lYo bushels cantaloupes. 

60 bushels cucumbers. 
968 heads lettuce. 
132 watermelons. 

13 bushels peas. 
114 bushels potatoes. 



1 bushel rhubarb. 

1 peck radishes. 

4 bushels spinach. 
11 bushels summer squash. 
50 bushels tomatoes. 
59 bushels turnips. 
62 bushels carrots. 
1,000 heads cabbage. 
4^/2 tons squash. 
20 bushels parsnips. 



Hogs slaughtered from stock 



of the farm, 2,895 pounds. 



1911, 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



31 



SPECIAL EEPOET. 



The following special report is prepared in accordance with 
a resolution of the i^'ational Conference of Charities and Cor- 
rections, adopted May 15, 1906 : — 



Population. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of inmates present at beginning of fiscal year, 


82 


76 


158 


Number received during the year, 


153 


149 


302 


Number discharged or died during the year. 


149 


151 


300 


Number at end of the fiscal year, 


84 


76 


160 


Daily average attendance (i.e., number of inmates actually 


83.85 


74.38 


158.23 


present) during the year. 








Average number of officers and employees during the year, 


33 


30 


63 



Expenditures. 

Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, . . . . 

2. Clothing, 

3. Subsistence, 

4. Ordinary repairs, . . . . 

5. Office, domestic and outdoor ex- 

penses, 

Total, 

Extraordinary expenses : — 

1. Additional furnishings and equip- 

ment, .... 

2. Addition to barn, . 

3. Hennery, piggery, etc., . 

4. Engine and generator, etc. 

5. Land, spur tracks, etc., . 

6. Sewerage purification. 

Total, 



$28,950 14 

385 10 

30,943 25 

5,511 76 

13,209 68 



$324 86 
2,537 75 
1,681 42 
1,500 00 
52 40 
967 27 



$78,999 93 



10,847 34 



Grand total, $89,847 27 



32 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Notes on current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages should include salaries of trustees or di- 

rectors, if any. 

2. Clothing includes shoes, and also materials for clothing and 

shoes if they are manufactured in the institution. 

3. Ordinary repairs include all of those which simply maintain the 

buildings in condition, without adding to them. Any repairs 
which are of the nature of additions should be classed with 
" permanent improvements." 

4. Tliis item includes everything not otherwise provided for, e.g., 

furniture, bedding, laundry supplies, medicines, engineer's 
supplies, postage, freight, library, etc. 
Executive head (superintendent and resident physician) : Carl C. 
McCoRisox. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 33 

STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Table 1. — Admissions and Discharges. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Patients in sanatorium Dec. 1, 1910, 


82 


76 


158 


Number of patients admitted Dec. 1, 1910, to Nov. 30, 1911, 


153 


149 


302 


inclusive. 








Number discharged Dec. 1, 1910, to Nov. 30, 1911, inclusive. 


149 


151 


300 


Number of deaths (included in preceding item), . 


31 


33 


64 


Number remaining in sanatorium Nov. 30, 1911, . 


84 


76 


160 


Daily average number of patients 


83.85 


74.38 


158.23 


Table 2. — Civil Condition of Patients admitted. 




Males. 


Fema.le3. 


Totals. 




68 


63 


131 


Single 


81 


76 


157 




4 


10 


14 


Totals 


153 


149 


302 



Table 3. — Age of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1 to 14 years 




4 


4 


14 to 20 years, 


12 


32 


44 


20 to 30 years 


61 


53 


114 


30 to 40 years, 


37 


33 


70 


40 to 50 years, 


23 


21 


44 


Over 50 years 


20 


6 


26 


Totals 


153 


149 


302 



34 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 4. — Nativity and Parentage of Patients admitted. 





Males 




Females. 


Totals 




PLACES OF NATIVITY. 












u 






u 




Patien 


Fathei 


Mothe 


Patien 


Fathei 


Mothe 


Patien 


Fathei 


Mothe 


Massachusetts, .... 


63 


22 


15 


57 


14 


15 


120 


36 


30 


Other New England States, . 


7 


7 


12 


3 


5 


4 


10 


12 


16 


Other States 


12 


7 


8 


8 


5 


6 


20 


12 


14 




82 


36 


35 


68 


24 


25 


150 


60 


60 


Other countries: — 






















1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 




12 


23 


25 


35 


39 


37 


47 


62 


62 


Denmark, 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 






6 


7 


2 


5 


7 


6 


11 


14 


Finland, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 




- 


1 


- 


1 


1 




1 


2 


1 




1 


1 


1 


- 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 




20 


43 


44 


20 


43 


42 


40 


86 


86 


Italy, 


2 


4 


4 


2 


5 


4 


4 


9 


8 


Norway, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Poland, 


- 




- 


3 


2 


3 


3 


2 


3 




1 


1 






1 




X 


2 


J 




22 


25 


25 


14 


15 


18 


36 


40 


43 




2 


2 




1 


5 


2 


3 


7 


3 




3 


3 


3 


1 


3 


2 


4 


6 


5 




1 


1 


1 








1 


1 


1 


Switzerland, 


1 


1 


1 








1 




1 










1 


1 




1 




1 




71 


114 


114 


81 


124 


121 


152 


238 


235 






3 


4 




1 


3 




4 


7 


Totals 


153 


153 


153 


149 


149 


149 


302 


302 


302 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 35 



Table 5. — Residence of Patients admitted. 



Place. 


Number. 


Place. 


Number. 






^^ewbxiryport 


3 




3 




7 






North. Attleborough, 








x^uitLi xvt;£iu.iiigy .... 






2 


i.^LfIl;IX TTV^UUilXf .... 






63 


"PI VTYimif ll 






2 


R,e3.(liii^ 


2 


BrookIin6 


2 


Readville 


1 




g 






C hclmsf ord 


1 




7 




14 


Somerville 


g 




2 


South FrsrD.iii^h3.m 




Everett 


g 


Stoneham 


3 


Fall River 




Swampscott, 


2 




9 






frTO n 1 1 P V 1 1 1 


2 


T'p w It qH 1 1 rv*" 


3 




J 


Tyngsborough, .... 




TTq vpr Vi ill 


10 




3 






WaltViQTY-i 


5 


Ipswich. 


4 


W3, t er tow D. 


2 


T ji n n a VI 1 1 o 


J 






T i?» WrATl PP 


g 




2 


Lincoln, ..... 


1 




1 


Lowell, 


22 


Whitman, 




Lynn, 


35 




4 


Maiden, 


21 


Winthrop, 


1 


Medf ord , 


8 


Woburn, 


3 


Melrose, 


2 


Worcester, 


1 


Milton, 




Total, 


302 



36 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. . [Dec. 

Table 6. — Occupation of Cases admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 1 




Males. 


Females. 


Brewery manager, . 


1 


- i 


Librarian, 


- 


1 


Baker, .... 


1 


- 


Musician, 


1 


- 


Bookkeeper, . 


1 


4 


Milliner, .... 


- 


1 


Box maker, 


- 


2 


Mill hand. 


2 


2 


Butler 


1 


- 


Machinist, 


7 


- 


Barber, .... 


1 


- 


Meter reader, . 


1 


- 


Blacksmith, . 


1 


- 


Master mariner, 


1 


- 


Broker, .... 


1 


- 


Milkman, 


1 


- 


Cashier, .... 


- 


1 


Mason, .... 


1 


- 


Carpet maker, 


- 


1 


Motorman, 


3 


- 


Cap maker, . 


- 


1 


Nurse, .... 


- 


2 


Clerk 


8 


3 


Photographer, 


1 


- 


Cook, .... 


1 


1 


Piano maker, . 


1 


- 


Carriage maker. 


1 


- 


Plasterer, 


2 


- 


Cigar maker, . 


1 


- 


Plumber, 


2 


- 


Coppersmith, 


2 




Painter, .... 


4 




Carpenter, 


3 




Pedler, .... 


1 


_ 


Coachman, 


1 


- 


Printer, .... 


1 


- 


Chauffeur, 


1 


- 


Rubber shoe maker, 


2 


1 


Domestic, 


- 


27 


Sailor, . • . 


1 


- 


Dressmaker, . 


- 


1 


Shoe worker, . 


21 


3 


Electrical factory opera- 
tive. 
Electrician, 


- 

3 


3 
- 


Student, 
Saleslady, 


7 
- 


8 
2 


Expressman, . 


1 


- 


Stenographer, 


2 


1 


Engraver, 


1 


- 


Seamstress, 


- 


1 


Embroidery worker. 


1 


- 


Stone cutter, . 


1 


- 


Factory operator, . 


- 


11 


Stove mounter. 


1 


- 


Fisherman, 


2 


- 


Silver polisher, 


2 


- 


Fireman, 


3 


- 


Street car conductor, 


2 


- 


Farmer, .... 


3 


- 


Shipper, .... 


2 


- 


Fish cutter, . 


1 


- 


Teamster, 


4 


- 


Freight handler. 


1 


- 


Tailor, .... 


4 


1 


Granite cutter, 


1 




Telephone operator. 




4 


Housewife, . • • 




54 


Tower man. 






Home, .... 


6 


6 


Underwriter, . 






Iron worker, . 


3 




Watchmaker, . 






Insurance agent, . 






Waiter, .... 


3 


6 


Janitor, .... 


1 




Weaver, .... 


2 




Laborer, .... 


13 




Totals, . 


153 


149 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 37 



Table 7. — Condition on Admission. 



Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Incipient, 


5 


9 


14 


Moderately advanced 


29 


36 


65 


Advanced, 


118 


103 


221 


N on-tubercular, 


1 


1 


2 


Totals 


153 


149 


302 


Table S. — Condition on Discharge. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




26 


25 


51 




49 


42 


91 


Progressive 


19 


35 


54 




31 


33 


64 


Not considered (duration of stay less than one month), 


23 


15 


38 


Non-tubercular, 


1 


1 


2 


Totals 


149 


151 


300 



Table 9. — Deaths. 



DuHATiox OF Disease. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Length of Residence in 
Sanatorium. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Under 1 month, 








5 


6 


11 


1 to 2 months, 








6 


5 


11 


2 to 3 months, 








3 


5 


8 


3 to 4 months, 








2 


3 


5 


4 to 5 months. 






1 




5 


5 


5 to 6 months. 


2 




3 


3 


2 


5 


6 to 7 months, 








1 




1 


7 to 8 months. 










2 


2 


8 to 9 months, 








1 




1 


10 to 12 months. 


2 




2 


3 


3 


6 


12 to 18 months. 


7 


2 


9 


4 


2 


6 


18 to 24 months. 


7 


16 


23 


3 




3 


Over 2 years 


12 


14 


26 








Totals 


31 


33 


64 


31 


33 


64 



38 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 

Table 10. — Cause of Death. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




31 


33 


64 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 



39 



LAKEYILLE STATE SANATOEIDM. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

SUMNER COOLIDGE, M.D., . . . Superintendent. 
ARTHUR P. JANES, M.D., .... Physician. 
FHAKK L. S. REYNOLDS, M.D., . . Physician. 



ABBIE A. BLISS, . . . . * . . Supervisor of Nurses. 

ELLA M. KELLEY, Matron. 

LESTON P. GIDDINGS, .... Steward. 

FRAN^^ H. GLOVER, Chief Engineer. 

JONAS HIRST, Farmer. 



40 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERIiS^TEis'DEis^T. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Ladies axd Gextlemen" : — I have the honor to submit here- 
with the report of the Lakeville State Sanatorium for the year 
ending l^ov. 30, 1911. 

During the year the institution has cared for 513 patients, 
of whom 356 were admitted after !^ov. 30, 1910, the latter 
number being classified as follows : incipient, 32, approximately 
9 per cent. ; moderately advanced, 105, or 29 per cent. ; ad- 
vanced, 218, or 60.7 per cent.; probably non-tuberculous, 1. 

Resideis^ce. 

Of these 356 patients, 134, or 37.6 per cent., were admitted 
from Boston; 19, or 5.3 per cent, from ITew Bedford; 15, or 
4.2 per cent., from Brockton; 26, or 7.3 per cent., from Fall 
River; 18, or 5 per cent., from Quincy, and 144, or about 40 
per cent., from 67 other towns and cities. 

Classification. 
The following comparative classification, before and after 
admission, of 500 cases discharged during the year, or remain- 
ing in the sanatorium i^^ovember 30, is interesting: — 



Before After 

Admission. Admission. 

Incipent, 107 43 

Moderately advanced, 291 185 

Advanced, 85 269 

Not classified, 17 3 



Total, 500 500 



Of 513 cases treated, 80, or 16 per cent., have been paid for 
by private funds; 252, or 49 per cent., by cities and towns; 
107, or 21 per cent, entirely by the State; and 33, or 6 per 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



41 



cent., were admitted as private cases and later became city or 
State charges. There remain 74 whose status has not yet been 
determined. 

The daily average number of bed cases has been 59.51, or 
37.4 per cent, of the total daily average number of patients. 

Classification on Discharge. 
It will be noticed that none were discharged " apparently 
cured," all who formerly would have been thus classified having 
been placed in the arrested " class. 

Length of Stay. 

The average length of stay of patients remaining in the sana- 
torium ^^'ov. 30, 1910, was one hundred and forty-one days on 
that date, representing the average stay of the more earnest 
and contented of those admitted during our first year. 

This period of stay has been maintained approximately 
throughout the year, the average for 1911 being 140.56 days. 
The longest stay was twenty-one months, nineteen days; the 
shortest, one day. 

Weights of Patients dischakged. 

Disregarding 53 men and 38 women who remained less than 
one week or who died, whose weight charts were necessarily 
incomplete, there remain 114 men whose average gain was 9.97 
pounds, and 88 women whose average gain was 12.9 pounds, 
making the total average gain for 202 patients, 10.89 pounds. 
There were 5 men and 4 women whose weights were the same 
on discharge as on admission, and 48 patients who lost weight. 

The greatest gain of a man was 40 pounds, and of a woman, 
44 pounds. 

Daily Average Population and Cost of Maintenance. 

By the use of a large tent and a small shack in addition to 
the two ward buildings it was possible to maintain a daily 
average of 158.81 patients for the whole year notwithstanding 
which there has always been a waiting list of applicants. 

Deducting $298.19, the amount of miscellaneous receipts. 



42 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



from the total cost of maintenance, $80,510.05, leaves $80,- 
211.86 as the net cost of maintenance, which on a basis of 
158.81 daily population is a per capita cost of $9.69 per week. 

Additions and Impeovements. 

During the year all the work for which special appropria- 
tions were made in 1910 was completed with the exception 
of a few minor details, and the same is true of the special 
appropriations of 1911, with the exception of that for a recre- 
ation and employment building. It has been thought best to 
defer the construction of this building until it could be more 
definitely decided what class of cases would predominate at 
this sanatorium, and whether or not the segregation of the 
sexes in separate sanatoria would be advisable. 

A new poultry house has been built, making a total capacity 
of 800 hens ; the sewerage system has been extended, and with 
the help of a new special appropriation of 8,000, which was 
granted just before the Legislature adjourned last summer, the 
water supply has been augmented by an open well 30 feet deep 
and 20 feet in diameter, which it is thought will afford a per- 
manent supply ample for all needs of the institution. 

Treatment. 

Routine physical examination of each patient is made on 
admission and every three months, and before leaving the sana- 
torium on leave of absence or discharge. Several examinations 
have been made by request of outside physicians and of the 
superintendent of a local shoe factory. 

Urinalysis is always done on admission and repeated as indi- 
cated. Six cases of nephritis have been discovered during the 
year. 

Sputum examinations are made on admission and when indi- 
cated, to confirm diagnosis or to ascertain the degree of im- 
provement. 

Occasional requests for sputum examinations from local 
physicians have always been cheerfully complied with. 

Seven hundred and fifteen sputum examinations were made 
during the year. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



43 



The use of tuberculin as a therapeutic agent was begun in 
a small way last March, and, on the whole, results have been 
encouraging. Eleven cases have been thus treated. We are 
planning now a larger series of cases for this year. 

In addition to the usual rest treatment in the open air, an 
attempt has been made to institute a system of graduated exer- 
cise, copying, so far as local conditions would allow, the plan 
of the Brompton Sanatorium at Frimley, England. The pa- 
tients are divided into two classes, according to their physical 
condition, as follows : — 

Class 1. White badge, no exercise. 

Class 2. (a) Green badge, exercise not to exceed one-half 
hour walking, make own bed. pick up papers and light rub- 
bish, etc. 

(b) Yellow badge, exercise not to exceed one hour, make 
own bed, wipe or wash dishes, clean silver, wipe woodwork, 
clean lavatories, hand weeding, etc. 

(c) Blue badge, exercise not to exceed two hours, make 
own bed, set out plants, trim bushes and bean poles, pick small 
stones, trim grass edges, rake, paint, sweep, etc. 

(d) Red badge, exercise to be increased gradually from two 
hours to six hours, make own bed, hoe, pull weeds, mow lawns, 
trim trees, pick stones, clear land, etc. 

This classification is revised monthly with reassignment of 
work to give variety, and otherwise modified when variations 
in the condition of patients make it advisable. 

The classes are differentiated by badges of distinctive colors, 
by which one may know at a glance to which class each patient 
belongs. 

The most difficult part of the scheme is to find occupations 
for the several classes with sufficient regularity and in sufficient 
quantity to cover an extended period of time, although it is 
almost as difficult to convince some patients that work, which 
in their experience has served only the purpose of feeding and 
clothing them, can bring them any good now that they are being 
comfortably fed and clothed by the bounty of others. 

To meet these two difficulties a great deal of time was spent 
by the superintendent in the personal supervision of outdoor 



44 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 



work for patients in the spring and early summer, and so long 
as the superintendent continued this personal supervision con-, 
siderable work of practical value was accomplished. 

Besides the ward work, making beds, cleaning, dusting, 
sweeping, serving, dish washing, etc., which is decidedly dis- 
tasteful to male patients, there were 30 to 40 per cent, of the 
men and a less proportion of the women engaged in outside 
work. The edging of the walks and drives, setting some 2,000 
bedding plants, trimming and pointing 2,000 bean poles, train- 
ing 1,000 tomato plants to wires throughout the season, raking 
the dressing from the lawns, cutting seed potatoes for 3 acres, 
shelling peas and beans and trimming dandelions throughout 
the season for the kitchen, and the planting of tulips and other 
bulbs were all done by patients, and they gave good help in 
clearing and burning brush and stumps, picking stones, setting 
nursery stock, mowing lawras, weeding lawns and flower beds, 
rolling lawns, gathering flower seeds and harvesting rye. Many 
of the patients had never done such work before, but almost 
all showed an interest in it, while being taught, and gained a 
greater confidence in the institution by doing a little real work 
for it. Xo attempt was made to work patients until they re- 
acted, and in no case was there perceptible injury to the patient. 

The most diligent and efficient worker was a man who spent 
the first twenty weeks in the sanatorium in bed, an advanced 
case with high temperature, but who later gained some 40 
pounds in spite of daily work through the hot weather, even- 
tually leaving the sanatorium an arrested case and returning to 
his work as a plumber. 

The first essential to such a system of exercising patients 
is personal supervision, and as no employee suitable for such 
supervisory work was available, the extent to which the system 
was carried was limited by the available time and energy of 
the superintendent. 

It is hoped that more can be accomplished this year. 

Improve:\[exts desired. 
In view of the fact that the waiting list of applicants has 
never been entirely exhausted, and that patients often have to 
wait eight or ten weeks after their applications are filed, it 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



45 



would seem imperative that our present capacity be increased. 
To this end it is recommended that a shack for 20 patients be 
erected, to cost $1,800. 

Another urgent need is that of a duplicate pump and motor 
for our water supply. The single unit upon which we are 
depending at present has been working continuously more than 
two years and is in need of repairs. We have been dangerously 
near a water famine by a small accident to the pump, showing 
the necessity of installing a duplicate. This will cost $600. 

The institution is finding great difficulty in procuring an 
adequate milk supply, and the time has come to consider the 
home production of milk. At present we require 43 cans per 
day. "We send four miles for it and wash the cans, so that 
it nets us over 50 cents per can of 8 quarts, or $7,847.50 per 
year. If this arrangement is to be continued it will be neces- 
sary to buy another horse. 

During September and October an unusual shortage in the 
local supply made it necessary to buy in Boston at a net cost 
of 8 cents per quart. 

At that time it was found that in this part of the State hardly 
enough milk is produced for the retail trade, that the large 
dealers have no distributing stations in this part of the State, 
and that no provision is made by the railroads for the transpor- 
tation of milk. 

The actual cost of producing our milk supply should not be 
over 5 cents per quart, and under favorable conditions it may 
be produced for less. 

It is recommended that about 70 acres of land, with build- 
ings which can be readily applied to our use, now on the mar- 
ket, be purchased and equipped with stock and apparatus as 
soon as practicable. The total initial cost of land, stock and 
equipment need not be over $10,000, which is but little more 
than one year's expenditure for milk under the present arrange- 
ments. 

The estimated cost of maintenance for such a dairy as is 
proposed would be approximately — 



46 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Interest on $10,000 at 4 per cent.. . 
Dairyman, $50 per month, 
Three men at $25 per month, . 
Feed for 35 cows at $3 per week, . 



$400 
600 
900 

5,460 



$7,360 

Credit, by rental of two-tenement house. 250 

Xet cost of maintenance, $7,110 

The laud in question, bordering the Xemasket River, is the 
best in this vicinity, and is now under cultivation. 

Medical Service. 

Dr. Solon W. Cornish, first assistant, resigned in February 
to take up private practice, and was succeeded by Arthur P. 
Janes, M.D., Tufts, 1905, formerly second assistant at the 
^orth Reading State Sanatorium. The position of second as- 
sistant was filled bv Dr. John J. Stack up to Jan. 2, 1911 ; by 
Dr. Clarence B. Kenney from Jan. 4, 1911, to July 1. 1911 ; 
and by Dr. Otis F. Simonds from July 9, 1911, to Aug. 30, 
1911, when he resigned to accept a position with the health 
department of the Canal Zone. The present incumbent, Frank 
L. S. Reynolds, M.D., Tufts, 1908, comes to us after two 
years' good experience in another State institution. 

The institution is most fortunate in securing the services of 
Miss Abbie A. Bliss as supervisor of nurses. Miss Bliss's expe- 
rience in executive work and as a teacher of nurses has already 
produced a marked improvement in the esprit de corps of the 
nursing staff. 

Appreciating the many expressions of the confidence of your 
Board, and commending the faithful co-operation of my subor- 
dinates, this report is respectfully submitted. 



Nov. 30, 1911. 



SUM^^'ER COOLIDGE, 

Superintendent. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 47 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending ^oy. 30, 1911: — 



Balance Dec. 1, 1910, 



Cash Account. 



$2,047 92 



Institution Receipts 
Board of inmates: — 
Private, 

Cities and towns, 



Receipts. 



$3,889 77 
8,849 33 



$12,739 10 



Salaries, wages and labor: 
Labor of employees, 



3 60 



.Sales: — 
Food, 

Clothing and materials, 

Furnishings, 

Miscellaneous, 



$3 00 
111 68 

10 84 
68 43 



193 95 



Farm, stable and grounds: 
Pigs and hogs, 
Vegetables, 



$9 00 
7 50 



16 50 



Miscellaneous receipts: — 

Interest on bank balances. 



84 14 



13,037 29 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Balance of 1910, 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30), 

Approved schedules of 1911, . $71,552 75 

Less returned, ... 6 32 



Special appropriations. 



$4,502 30 
5,000 00 

71,546 43 



81,048 73 
13,682 99 



Total, 



$109,816 93 



48 HOSPITALS FOR CONSmiPTIVES. [Dec. 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1910, 

Eleven months' schedules, 1911, 

November advances, ..... 



Special appropriations : — 
Approved schedules, 

Balance, Nov. 30, 1911: — 
In bank. 
In office, 



$6,550 22 
71.546 43 
2,153 41 



$2,749 03 
97 56 



$13,037 29 



80,250 06 



13,682 99 



2,846 59 



Total $109,816 93 



Maintenance. 



Appropriation, ....... 

Expenses (as analyzed below), .... 

Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 



$80,520 00 
80,510 05 

$9 95 



Analysis of Expenses. 



Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration, 
Medical service, . 
Ward service (male), . 
"Ward service (female), 
Repairs and improvements. 
Farm, stable and grounds. 



Food: — 
Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, . 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 

Meats, 

Milk, 

Molasses and sjo-up. 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 
Vegetables, 
Sundries, . 



Clothing and materials : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers. 
Clothing, . 



$15,291 30 
4,550 87 
1,273 22 
3,657 67 
2,289 28 
5,218 01 



$1,735 19 
163 29 
89 93 
128 06 
217 77 
54 91 
2,191 10 
776 46 
663 49 
634 25 
6,739 17 
6,389 05 
23 85 
671 31 
416 83 
1,006 32 
441 05 



S87 10 
413 37 



$32,280 35 



22.342 03 



Amounts carried forward, 



$500 47 $54,622 38 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



49 



Amounts brought forward, 

Clothing and materials — Con. 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 
Furnishing goods, ... 
■ Hats and caps, .... 
Sundries, ..... 

Furnishings : — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 
Brushes, brooms, ... 
Carpets, rugs, etc., . . . . 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc., . 
Furniture and upholstery. 
Kitchen furnishings, . . . , 
Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc., 
Sundries, ...... 

Heat, light and power: — 

Coal , 

Freight on coal, . . . . , 

Oil, 

Sundries, ...... 

Repairs and improvements : — 

Brick 

Cement, lime and plaster, 
Doors, sashes, etc., , . . , 
Electrical work and supplies, 
Hardware, ...... 

Lumber, ...... 

Machinery, etc., . . . . . 

Paints, oil, glass, etc., . . . . 

Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies. 

Roofing and materials, 

Sundries, ...... 

F»m, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies. 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc.. 
Hay, grain, etc., . . . . . 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Other live stock, . . . . 

Rent, 

Tools, farm machines, etc., . 

Sundries, ...... 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc.. 
Chapel services and entertainments. 
Freight, expressage and transportation, 
Funeral expenses, . . . . 
Hose, etc., ..... 



$500 47 $54,622 38 



1 50 

5 98 
3 43 
10 50 

521 88 

$515 87 
129 83 
552 94 
352 69 
209 23 
622 31 
43 83 
387 87 
2,814 57 

$3,596 97 

97 53 

69 32 
189 62 
3,953 44 

$41 77 
357 32 
170 95 
902 01 
514 67 
1,066 81 
220 65 
345 22 
1,848 33 
291 88 
573 19 
6,332 80 



$118 98 

309 57 

754 41 
2,157 26 
66 85 

491 81 

300 00 

420 82 

183 94 
4,803 64 

$183 62 
306 05 
918 15 
50 00 
88 57 



Amounts carried forward, 



$1,546 39 $73,048 71 



50 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amounts brought forward, . > . . . SI, 546 39 S73,C48 71 

Miscellaneous — Con. 

Ice, 592 53 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . . . 2,098 72 

Postage 160 00 

Printing and printing supplies, . . . 284 41 

Sputum fillers, 502 68 

Soap and laundry supplies, .... 364 95 

Stationery and office supplies, . . . 678 73 

Travel and expenses (officials), . . . 307 06 

Telephone and telegraph, .... 281 73 

, Tobacco ' . . 9 46 

Paper napkins, ...... 151 36 

Sundries 483 32 

7,461 34 



Total expenses for maintenance, ..... §80,510 05 

Special Appropriations. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1910, S9,682 82 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... 6,300 00 



Total, $15,982 82 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), S13,682 99 
Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . 3 20 

13,686 19 



Balance Nov. 30, 1911 $2,296 63 

Resources axd Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand, $2,846 59 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money), 2,153 41 

Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 

November, 1911, schedule 3,963 62 

$8,963 62 

Liabilities. 

Schedule of November bills $3,963 62 



Per Capita. 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 15,881. 

Total cost for maintenance, $80,510.05. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $9,722. 

Receipts from sales, $214.05. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $0,025. 

All other institution receipts, $12,823.24. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of $1,548. 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 



9> 



'5 3 



a, 

o 



r— jrj ^ t^j '-"^ 
OC :C r-i O O GC CO 

»-'^ i-< (M O CM (M 
(M C5 O C3C O 









O 




O 




o 








of 







CO X (N 00 OC T-i 

1— I CO X C5 i-H o o 

Tti !M X i:^ ir^ <M 

l:^ O C5 i-H CO 

O CO ""^ (M 



C: T-i 



CO 



<M O o i:^ 00 

X CO (M rH O 

O CO !M O 

'Tf CO O T-1 CO 
!>. lO r-i 1— 1 Tf 

CC 
€0 



O O 

o o 

o o 
o o 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 



o o o o o o 
to o o o o o 

CO tC X iO o 



o 

CO 



§ 

o 



s 

CO 
o 

0) 



xxxxxxxccx 

1— ll— It— IT-HCSCSCICOCS 



c3c3c3rfc3c353o3c3 

32 31 30 X 



"■S 2 IT i 



^ fi, o pi 



52 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



VALUATION. 



Real estate : — 

Land, number of acres, 75, valuation, . . . $4,125 00 
Buildings and water plant, valuation, 

1910, $93,875 00 

Additions and improvements, 1911, . 28,220 00 

122,095 00 



Total real estate valuation, . . . . . $126,220 00 

Personal estate : — 

Live stock on farm, . . . . . .' . 3,205 00 

Produce of fann on hand, 293 00 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . . 1,703 50 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, .... 2,070 00 
Beds and bedding in inmates' department, . . 4,037 28 
Other furniture in inmates' depai'tment, . . . 1,679 37 
Personal property of State in superintendent's de- 
partment, 7,467 98 

Ready-made clothing. 156 93 

Provisions and groceries, 887 97 

Drugs and medicines, 548 27 

Fuel, 1,006 50 

Other supplies undistributed, . . . . . 1,817 75 



Total personal estate valuation, . . ' . . $24,873 55 



Total valuation. 



$151,093 55 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo 77. 



53 



SPECIAL REPORT. 



The following report is prepared in accordance with a resolution 
of the National Conference of Charities and Corrections, adopted 
May 15, 1906: — 

Population. 



Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients present at beginning of fiscal j^ear, 


' 80 


77 


157 


Number received during the year, 


211 


145 


356 


Number discharged or died during the year, 


206 


144 


350 




85 


78 


163 


Daily average attendance (i.e., number of inmates actually 


81.32 


77.49 


158.81 


present) during the year. 








Average number of officers and employees during the year. 


44 


22 


66 



Expenditures. 

Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, . . . $32,280 35 

2. Clothing, 521 88 

3. Subsistence, 22,342 03 

4. Ordinary repairs and improve- 

ments, 6,332 80 

5. Office, domestic, and outdoor ex- 

penses, 19,032 99 



$80,510 05 



Extraordinary expenses : — 

1. New buildings, land, etc., . ^. $9,196 99 

2. Permanent improvements to exist- 

ing buildings and grounds, . . 4,486 00 

Total 13.682 99 



Grand total. 



$94,193 04 



o-i HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 

Summary of Current Expenses. 

Total expenditures, $94,193 04 

Deducting extraordinary expenses, 13,682 99 

$80,510 05 

Deducting amount of sales, . . . ♦ . . . 298 19 

$80,211 86 

Di\'iding this amount by the daily average number of patients, 158.81, 
gives a cost for the year of $505.08, equivalent to an average weekly 
net cost of $9.69.' 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



55 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Table 1. — Admissions and Discharges. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients admitted, Dec. 1, 1901, to Nov. 30, 1911, 


211 


145 


356 


inclusive. 








Number of patients discharged, Dec. 1, 1910, to Nov. 30, 1911, 


206 


144 


350 


inclusive. 








Number of deaths (included in preceding item), 


36 


26 


62 


Number remaining in sanatorium, Nov. 30, 1911, . 


85 


78 


163 




81.32 


77.49 


158.81 


Daily average number of bed patients, Dec. 1, 1910, to Nov. 


28.23 


31.28 


59.51 


30, 1911. 









Table 2. — Civil Condition of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




74 


59 


133 


Single 


123 


78 


201 


Widowed, 


11 


6 


17 




3 


2 


5 


Separated, 










211 


145 


356 



Table 3. — Age of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1 to 14 years, 


2 


2 


4 


14 to 20 years 


27 


21 


48 


20 to 30 years, 


83 


68 


151 


30 to 40 years, 


56 


35 


91 


40 to 50 years, 


30 


15 


45 


Over 50 years, 


13 


4 


17 




211 


145 


356 



56 HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 4. — Xativity and Parentage of Patients admitted. 







Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


PLACES OF NATIVITY. 


itient. 


ither. 


o 

JS 

o 


1 

S 




other. 


a 
,o 




u 

JZ 

"o 




(U 






Ph 






a 






United States: — 




















Massachusetts, .... 


90 


24 


22 


51 


20 


21 


141 


44 


43 


Other New England States, . 


11 


9 


8 


7 


8 


5 


18 


17 


13 


Other States, 


8 


6 


6 


9 


5 


8 


17 


11 


14 


Total native 


109 


39 


36 


67 


33 


34 


176 


72 


70 


Other countries: — 




















Austria, 


4 


3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


6 


5 


6 


Azores 


1 


1 




1 


2 


2 


> 2 


3 


3 


Belgium, 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Bulgaria, 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Canada, 


19 


31 


32 


18 


18 


21 


37 


49 


53 


Denmark, 


2 


2 


2 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


2 


2 


England, 


9 


11 


10 


7 


9 


7 


16 


20 


17 


France 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Germany, 


2 


5 


3 


1 


5 


4 


3 


10 


7 


Greece, ... ... 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Holland 






- 


- 


1 




- 


1 


- 


Ireland, 


18 


55 


61 


18 


35 


34 


36 


90 


95 


Italy, 


4 


10 


10 


5 


5 


5 


9 


15 


15 


Japan 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


Portugal, 


1 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


Russia, 


22 


24 


24 


19 


22 


21 


41 


46 


45 


Scotland 


2 


2 


- 


1 


3 


3 


3 


5 


3 


Sweden, 


8 


11 


10 


4 


5 


5 


12 


16 


15 


Syria. 




1 


1 










1 


1 


Turkey, 

Wales, 


2 


2 


2 




1 




2 


2 
1 


2 


West Indies, 


1 




1 








1 


1 


1 


Total foreign, .... 


100 


164 


165 


76 


109 


107 


176 


273 


272 


Unknown, 


2 


8 


10 


2 


3 


4 


4 


11 


14 


Totals 


211 


211 


211 


145 


145 


145 


356 


356 


356 





1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 57 



Table 5. — Residence of Patients admitted. 



Place. 


Number. 


Place. 


Number. 


Abington, 


c 



AllillS, .... 




J 


Amesbury, 


1 






I 


Ashland 


2 


Milford 




o 

o 


Attleborough, .... 


10 


Needham, 




1 
I 


Braintree, 


<j 

o 


Newton, 




3 


Bridgewater, 


2 






10 


Boston, 


134 


^^rtrfnlV "Down a 






Brockton, 


15 


'NTnrtVi 'Rnatnn 

til J-J£*3lV^lJ, . . 




2 


Brookline, 


o 



North Reading, 




J 


Cambridge 


5 


Norwood, 




2 


Canton, 


5 


Onset, .... 




X 


Chatham, . . 


2 


IT I LISUPIU , 






Chelsea, 


2 


"PI vmf\n 

Ijr iiiwiitii, . . 




7 


Dedham* 




Quincy, .... 




10 


Dennisport, ..... 




Randolph, . . . 




2 


Everett, 




Raynham, 




i 


Fairhaven 




Revere, .... 






Fall River, 


26 


Rockland, ... 




A 
t 


Fiskdale, 




Somer\''ille, . . . 




O 

o 


Foxbo rough, ..... 




Southbridge, . 




1 


Hampton, N. H., .... 




South Framingham, 






Hanover, 




opringneia, 




1 


Hanson, 




Stoughton, 




1 


Hatfield, 




Xaunton, 




11 


Hingham 




Upton, .... 




^ 


Hopedale, ..... 




Uxbridge, 






Hyde Park 




Waltham, 




4 


Ix)well, 




Wareham, 




2 


Maiden, ..... 




Watertown, 




3 


Mansfield, 




Waverley, 




1 


Marlborough, .... 




Webster, 




1 


Marstons Mills, .... 


1 


Westwood, 




1 


Mashpee, 




Whitman, 




2 


Mattapoisttt, .... 




Woburn, 






Maynard, 


2 


Worcester, 




1 


Medway, 








356 


Middleborough 


3 









58 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 

Table 6. — Occupations. 





Males. 


Females. 




Males. 


Females. 


Baker, .... 


1 


- 


Musician, 


1 


1 


Barber 


1 


- 


No occupation. 


3 


- 


Bartender, 


3 


- 


Nurse 


3 


4 


Bookbinder, . 


1 


- 


Painter, 


1 


- 


Brakeman, 


2 


- 


Pattern maker. 


1 


- 


Bricklayer, 


2 


- 


Pedler 


2 


- 


Candy maker. 


1 


3 


Photographer, 


1 


- 


Car cleaner, . 


1 


- 


Picture frame maker. 


1 


- 


Carpenter, 


3 


- 


Plumber, 


2 


- 


Cigar maker, . 


2 


1 


Printer, .... 


3 


- 


Clerk 


13 


5 


Reporter, 


1 


- 


Clothing designer, . 


1 


- 


Roofer, .... 


1 


- 


Coachman, 


1 


- 


Rope maker, 


1 


- 


Cook 


- 


4 


Sailor 


1 


- 


Cooper, . . . . 


1 


- 


Salesman, 


4 


1 


Domestic, . . 


- 


24 


School, .... 


7 


ft 


Dressmaker, . 


- 


6 


Shipper, .... 


1 


- 


Engraver, 


2 


- 


Ship rigger, . 


1 


- 


Errand girl, . 


- 


1 


Shirtwaist factory. 


- 


2 


Factory foreman, . 


1 


- 


Seamstress, 


- 


4 


Factory operatives. 


3 


5 


Shoe maker, . 


2 


- 


Farmer, 


3 


- 


Shoe operative. 


30 


3 


Fireman, 


1 


- 


Silver buffer, . 


1 


- 


Fish cutter, . 


1 


- 


Stationary engineer, 


1 


- 


Furrier, .... 


1 


- 


Street railroad inspector. 


1 


- 


Gas fitter, 


1 


- 


Stenographer, 


2 


4 


Gardener, 


2 


- 


Stone mason, . 


2 


- 


Glass blower, . 


2 


- 


Stone cutter. 


8 


- 


Hatter, .... 


4 


- 


Street car conductor. 


1 


- 


Housewife, 


- 


50 


Tailor 


3 


1 


Iron molders, , . 


2 


- 


Teamster, 


10 


- 


Jewelry factory, 


5 


3 


Telephone operator. 


- 


1 


Laborer, .... 


20 


- 


Telegraph operator. 


3 




Machinist, 


11 




Textile mill operative, . 


10 


12 


Meat cutter, . 


2 




Toy maker, 


1 




Messenger boy. 


1 




Tradeswoman, 




1 


Milliner, .... 




1 


Waiter, .... 


3 


1 


Missionary, 




1 




211 


145 


Motorman, 


3 











1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 59 



Table 7. — Condition on Admission. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 






21 


11 


32 


Moderately advanced, 




70 


'35 


105 






119 


99 


218 






1 






Totals, 




211 


145 


356 


Table 8. — Condition on Discharge. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Per Cent. 


Arrested, 


11 


13 


24 


6.86 




98 


53 


151 


43.14 




29 


29 


58 


16.57 


Died, 


36 


26 


62 


17.71 


Not considered (duration of stay less than one 
month). 


32 


23 


55 


15.72 




206 


144 


350 


100.00 



Table 9. — Classification of Discharges. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




206 


144 


350 


Number died, • 


36 


26 


62 




170 


118 


288 


Not considered, 


32 


23 


55 


Total number considered, 


138 


95 


233 



GO HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 10. — Deaths. 





DuRATiox OF Disease. 


Length of Residence ix 
j Sanatorium. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1 Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Under 1 month, 


- 


_ 


_ 


7 


4 


11 


1 to 2 months, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6 


5 


11 


2 to 3 months, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


1 


6 


3 to 4 months. 


- 


_ 


_ 


6 


2 


8 


4 to 5 months. 


- 


- 


- 


2 


5 


7 


5 to 6 months, 


_ 


- 


_ 


3 


2 


5 


6 to 7 months. 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


1 


7 to 8 months. 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


4 


8 to 9 months, 


_ 


- 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


9 to 10 months. 


- 


1 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


10 to 11 months, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


11 to 12 months. 








1 


1 


2 


1 to 2 years, .... 


22 


15 


37 


1 


3 


4 


2 to 3 j-ears, .... 


6 


6 


12 








3 to 4 years, .... 


4 


3 


7 








4 to 5 years, .... 


1 




1 








10 to 11 years, .... 


1 




1 




~ 




Unknown, .... 


2 




2 








Totals 


36 


26 


62 


36 


26 


62 





Table 11. — Cause of Death. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Phthisis pulmonalis, 


36 


26 i 


62 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 77. 



61 



WESTFIELD STATE SANATORIUM. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

HENRY D. CHADWICK, M.D., . . . Superintendent. 
HARRY S. WAGNER, M.D., .... Physician. 
ROY MORGAN, M.D., ..... Physician. 



CAROLINE A. BAILEY, .... Supervisor of Nurses. 

HERBERT W. SMITH, Steward. 

WALTER PROUTY, Chief Engineer. 

FRANK P. BUXTON, Farmer. 



62 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Ladies axd Gex tlemex : — I have the honor of presenting 
to you the second annual report of the Westfield State Sanato- 
rium for the year ending Nov. 30, 1911. 

One hundred and fifty-seven patients admitted during the 
previous year remained in the sanatorium on Dec. 1, 1910 ; 323 
patients have since been admitted, making a total of 480 pa- 
tients receiving treatment during the year. Three hundred 
and fifteen have been discharged, leaving 165 patients in the 
sanatorium Dec. 1, 1911. 

The daily average number of patients has been 156.8. The 
daily average number of bed patients has been 26 men and 29 
women, — a total of 55. This is but one more than the average 
last year, although there has been an increase of 72 in the 
average daily population. 

The average length of stay of discharged patients has been 
one hundred and forty-five days. Fifty-one stayed less than 
one month, 92 one to three months, 73 from three to six months, 
41 from six to nine months, 33 from nine months to one year; 
25 stayed more than one year. 

The condition of patients on admission and on discharge 
will be found in the appended tables of statistics. 

Of the 323 patients admitted, 142 paid their board, 102 were 
supported by cities and towns, 35 were State charges and the 
status of 44 has not yet been determined. 

The gross weekly per capita cost has been $9.78. The per 
capita cost less sales, $9.59, less total receipts, $6.88. 

The average age of all patients admitted was twenty-nine 
years ; 12 were under fourteen years and 49 were between four- 
teen and twenty years of age. 

The presence of many children in the wards with adults. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



63 



unless they are ill in bed, is not to be recommended on account 
•of their noise and activity, which interferes Avith the quiet and 
rest which older people require. Of more importance still is 
the fact that there are always some degenerate individuals in 
the wards whose moral influence is bound to have an evil effect 
on the character of the children. I hope that enough children 
will soon be admitted to fill one of our pavilions and so keep 
them isolated from the adults. A teacher can then be em- 
ployed and a hospital school conducted. This would interest 
the children and make them more contented, although as a 
class they are inclined to be less homesick than are older pa- 
tients. Their education would not then be completely inter- 
rupted as is now the case when a child is excluded from the 
public schools on account of illness. 

Laboeatoey Woek. 

The number of sputum examinations made has been 966; 
the number of blood examinations, 22 ; vaccines prepared, 17. 

Eighteen patients raised no sputum for examination. 

The sputum of 203 patients was positive on the first exami- 
nation. It required 2 examinations to find tubercle bacilli in 
the sputum of 50 patients, 3 examinations to find bacilli in the 
sputum of 18 patients, 4 examinations to find tubercle bacilli 
in* the sputum of 8 patients and 5 examinations to find bacilli 
in the sputum of 3 patients. 

Eleven patients who had positive sputum when admitted lost 
their bacilli during residence so that their sputum was negative 
when discharged. Antiformin was used in testing 60 specimens 
of sputum, 7 of which proved positive, although bacilli could 
not be found by other methods. The sputum of 13 patients, 
which was negative by all tests, proved to be negative to guinea- 
pig inoculation. 

The Yon Pirquet tuberculin test was made on 69 patients. 

Thirty-four patients have been treated with bouillion filtrate 
tuberculin over a period of from two to eight months. 

Six patients have been admitted and discharged during the 
year on whom, after careful observation and tuberculin tests, 
we failed to find sufficient evidence of tuberculosis. Three had 



64 HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. [Dec. 

chronic asthma; 1, ahscess of lung; 1, malignant disease of the 
lung; 1, valvular disease of the heart; 1, convalescent from 
pneumonia; 1, abdominal tumor. 

iMrROVEMEXTS. 

The $1,000 appropriated for enlarging the locker rooms and 
diet kitchens has been expended. The additional space in the 
locker rooms provides for 20 more lockers. This will allow us 
to increase the number of beds from 158 to 178. During the 
three winter months it will not be advisable to care for more 
than 170, but the remainder of the year a full number can be 
provided for by leaving some beds on the porches. 

The improvements in the diet kitchens are gi^eatly appre- 
ciated ; the increased space and equipment facilitates the prep- 
aration of the trays for the bed patients and enables us to serve 
the food in a more appetizing way. 

Considerable grading has been done about the buildings. 
Walks have been laid out and trees and shrubbery plante.d. 

Improvements Js'eeded. 
Water Supply. 

I again urge the purchase of the Pignatare farm. This ad- 
joins the portion of our property from which we obtain our 
water supply. A monthly examination of the water has been 
made by the State Board of Health, and slight evidence of 
sewage contamination is frequently found. The only appar- 
ent source from which this can come is the above-mentioned 
farm, on which a house is situated within a few hundred feet 
of our wells. I have recommended an appropriation of $3,500 
for the purchase of the fann. 

Grade Crossing. 
The abolition of the grade crossing over the Boston & Albany 
railroad and the substitution therefor of an underpass is an 
urgent necessity. Each Sunday and holiday from 300 to 500 
persons cross the tracks by way of the foot path, and several 
have narrowly escaped being killed. One of our teams barely 
missed being hit by a train at .Lee's crossing. Serious accidents 
to several other vehicles have been narrowly averted during the 
past year. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



65 



Milh Supply. 

We were unable to get sufficient milk of good quality during 
the past year, and recently I have made a contract with a group 
of farmers 8 miles from the sanatorium to supply us for the 
ensuing year. This requires an additional team and employee 
to attend to the transportation. 

The sanatorium property was originally a stock farm, and is 
capable, when under a good state of cultivation, of raising suffi- 
cient feed for 40 cows. I have recommended, therefore, that 
an appropriation of $2,000 be made for the construction of a 
cow stable, and $1,500 for the purchase of some cows. 

Acknowledgments. 

I beg to acknowledge my indebtedness to the many kind peo- 
ple in Westfield and Springfield w^ho, besides evincing cordial 
interest in the work of the institution, have freely contributed 
books, magazines, clothing, Christmas gifts and entertainments. 
This generosity has aided materially in making the sanatorium 
life of the patients more contented and happy. 

I wish to express my appreciation for the sympathetic co- 
operation in the sanatorium work of our chaplains, Rev. Fr. 
Abeam, his assistant, Rev. Fr. O'Malley, and Rev. Robert 
Keating Smith; also to the clergymen in the adjoining towns 
who have frequently volunteered their services. 

I gratefully acknowledge the aid I have received from my 
assistants, the heads of the departments and other employees in 
carrying on the work of the sanatorium during the past year. 

To you, members of the Board of Trustees, I wish to express 
my deep appreciation for your continued support and confi- 
dence. 

Respectfully submitted. 



HEISTRY D. CHADWICK, 

Superintendent, 



66 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending Xov. 30, 1911 : — 



Balance Dec. 1, 1910, 



Cash Account. 



$2,385 90 



Institution Receipts 
Board of inmates: — 
Private, 

Cities and towns, 



Receipts. 



$8,457 70 
13,511 92 



821,969 62 



Food, 

Clothing and materials. 
Furnishings, 

Repairs and improvements 
Miscellaneous, 

Farm, stable and grounds : — 
Pigs and hogs. 
Sundries, 



8397 55 
5 25 
10 50 
48 
232 61 



922 61 
4 00 



1,573 00 



Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances. 
Sundries, 



S88 01 
16 65 



104 66 



23,647 28 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance of 1910, 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30), 

Approved schedules of 1911, 874,467 83 
Less returned, . . 53 96 



Special appropriations, 
Less returned. 



82,242 64 
5,000 00 

74,413 87 

$3,263 66 
4 95 



81,656 51 



3,258 71 



Total, $110,948 40 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



67 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, . . . $23,647 28 

Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1910, . . $4,628 54 

Eleven months' schedules, 1911, . . . 74,413 87 

November advances, ..... 3,837 53 

82,879 94 



Special appropriations: — 

Approved schedules, ........ 3,258 71 

Balance, Nov. 30, 1911: — 

In bank, S983 01 

In office, 179 46 

1,162 47 



Total $110,948 40 



Maintenance. 

Appropriation $80,000 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below), ....... 79,999 89 

Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, . . . SO 11 



Analysis of Expenses. 



Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration, 
Medical service, . 
Ward service (male), . 
Ward service (female), 
Repairs and improvements, 
Farm, stable and grounds. 



$13,399 90 

4,758 34 

3,229 64 

2,561 80 

1,165 52 

5, 80 68 



$30,595 



Food: 



Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers. 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc. 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, . 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 

Meats, 

Milk, 

Molasses and syrup. 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 

Vegetables, 

Sundries, 



$2,494 66 
10 80 
. 110 32 
63 23 
230 36 
125 05 
2,388 24 
195 38 
866 04 
1,270 59 
10,018 04 
5,766 96 
46 32 
861 44 
448 96 
1,473 94 
593 73 



26,964 06 



Amount carried forward, ...... . 857,559 94 



68 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, 



857,459 94 



Clothing and materials: — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 
Furnishing goods. 
Leather and shoe findings, . 
Sundries, ..... 



Furnishings: — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms. 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 

Crockerj', glassware, cutlery, etc. 

Furniture and upholstery, 

Kitchen furnishings. 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc. 

Sundries, .... 



Heat, light and power 
Coal, 

Freight on coal, 
Wood, 
Oil, . 
Sundries, 



Repairs and improvements: — 
Steel stalls, 

Brick, .... 
Cement, lime and plaster. 
Doors, sashes, etc.. 
Electrical work and supplies. 
Hardware, .... 
Lumber, .... 
Machinery-, etc., . 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., . 
Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies. 
Roofing and materials, 
Sundries, 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies, 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs, 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc.. 
Hay, grain, etc., . 
Harnesses and repairs, 
Other live stock. 
Rent, 

Tools, farm machines, etc.. 
Sundries, 



S20 75 
748 42 
10 20 
6 91 
75 
5 96 



S785 59 
162 62 
133 58 
307 69 
471 05 
647 56 
43 62 
430 32 



81,614 46 
2,739 28 
71 70 
65 50 
60 70 



8326 70 
10 00 
179 54 
87 50 
299 49 
224 28 

1,292 64 
483 95 
529 06 

1,219 88 
286 90 
444 71 



8109 95 
172 45 
802 59 
771 06 
31 91 
15 00 
5 00 
491 39 
307 53 



)2 99 



2,982 03 



4,551 64 



5,384 65 



J,706 88 



Amount carried forward, 



§73,978 13 



1911.1 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 



Amount brought forward, 

Miscellaneous : — 

Books, periodicals, etc., 

Chapel services and entertainments, 

Freight, expressage and transportation. 

Funeral expenses. 

Ice, ...... 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra) 
Postage, ..... 

Printing and printing supplies. 
Soap and laundrj- supplies, . 
Stationery- and office supplies. 
Travel and expenses (officials). 
Telephone and telegraph, 
Cuspidor supplies. 
Sundries, ..... 



Total expenses for maintenance. 



S97 82 
488 57 
516 87 

20 00 

30 08 
1,997 6-4 

20 00 
149 64 

33 03 
716 41 
401 82 
319 86 
411 36 
472 69 
345 97 



69 

873,978 13 



6,021 76 



879,999 89 



Special Appropriatioxs 

Balance Dec. 1, 1910, 

Appropriations for fiscal year, .... 

Total, 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed). 
Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 



S3,25S 71 
06 



81.727 56 

3,800 00 

85,527 56 



3,258 77 



Balance Xov. 30, 1911, 



$2,268 79 



Resources axt) Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand 81,162 47 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money), 3,837 53 

Due from treasury of Commonwealth account 

November, 1911, schedule, .... 586 02 



85.586 02 



hedule of November bills. 



Liabilities. 



85,586 02 



Per Capita. 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 156.8. 

Total cost for maintenance, 879,999.89. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of 89.784+, 

Receipts from sales, 81,573. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of 80.190+. 

All other institution receipts, 822,074.28. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of 82.714 +. 



70 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



<D>H 



O C<J 05 

o o o 



^3 
X o 



00 o 

05 O 

05 O 
OS O 

Ttl CO 



00 T-H 

CO 



00 



o 

05 O 

(M CO 
CO 05 

o^co 

1—1 



00 T-H 

05 (M 



00 Oi rH 
05 05 CO 



O O 
O O 

O O 
O O 

lo CO 



o o o o 
o o o o 

o o o o 
>o o o o 

C0_^00_^0^0^ 

CO r-H r-H T-^ 



o 
o 

o 



T— ^ rH 

OS OS 
1—1 1—1 

CO OQ 

<J<1 



Tt< 00 00 00 
(M CO CO CO 



Ph Ph 

o3 cJ o3 c3 
^^^^ 
O O O CJ 

criF-Tr-Ti— r 

OS OS OS OS 

r-i r-i r-i r-i 

GO 02 CO O! 
-(-^ 4-3 

a o tJ « 

<<<< 



O 
^ o 

CO q; 

<^ ^ B 



©'"el 

CO 



O/ a; 

CO 



o 



o 



O o3 _ 

o cu o 



a c f-t 



o 

CO 





5- 




?^ 
CO 


o 












(— 1 








W 




o 




p 

























CO 

w 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



71 



VALUATION^. 



Real estate : — 

Cultivated land, 62 acres; wood land, 40 acres; pas- 
turage, 28 acres; administration building, service 
building, four ward buildings, piggery, bam, farm- 
house, $96,058 00 

Personal estate : — 



Live stock on farm, .... 


$3,325 


00 


Produce of the farm on hand, . 


1,306 


00 


Carriages and agricultural implements. 


2,666 


00 


Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 


6,994 


00 


Beds and bedding, 


6,132 


00 


Other furniture, 


4,678 


00 


Personal property of State in superin- 






tendent's department, . . . . 


450 


00 




262 


00 


Provisions and groceries, 


798 


00 


Drugs and medicines, . . . . 


270 


00 


Fuel, 


182 


00 




25 


00 


Other supplies, undistributed. 


418 


00 



27,506 00 



$123,564 00 



72 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



PEODUCE OE FARM. 



25 bushels peas. 
200 bunches radishes. 

30 bushels onions. 

30 bushels tomatoes. 

20 bushels cucumbers. 
1,000 pounds squash. 
350 dozen sweet corn. 
300 bushels potatoes. 
100 bushels carrots. 

Received from sale of hogs and pigs, $922.61. 
» Pork used by sanatorium to the value of $352.20. 



30 bushels beets. 

90 bushels parsnips. 

80 bushels turnips. 
900 pounds cabbage. 

50 bushels rye. 
500 bushels corn. 

30 tons hay. 

30 tons hay. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



73 



SPECIAL EEPORT. 



The following special report is prepared in accordance with a 
resolution of the National Conference of Charities and Correc- 
tions, adopted May 15, 1906: — 

Fopulation. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number received during the year, .... 


152 


171 


323 


Number passing out of the institution during the year, 


142 


173 


315 


Number at the end of the fiscal year in the institution. 


80 


85 


165 


Daily average attendance (number of inmates actually pres- 


79 


77.4 


156.8 


ent) during the year. 








Average number of employees and officers during the year, 


41 


21 


62 



Expenditures. 

CuiTent expenses : — 

1. Salaries and Avag-e?, 

2. Clothing, 

3. Subsistence, 

4. Ordinary repairs, . . . . 

5. Office, domestic and 'outdoor ex- 

penses, 

Total, . . . . : 
Extraordinary expenses : — 

1. Permanent improvements to exist- 
ing buildings, . , . . 
Total, 



$30,595 88 
792 99 
26,964 06 
5,384 65 

16,262 31 



$3,258 71 



$79,999 89 



3,258 71 



Grand total, $83,268 60 



74 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Table 1. — Admissions and Discharges. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients admitted December 1 to November 30, 


152 


171 


323 


inclusive. 








Number of patients discharged December 1 to November 30, 


142 


173 


315 


inclusive. 








Number of deaths (included in preceding item), . 


44 


25 


69 








156.8 


Number in sanatorium Dec. 1, 1910, . . 






157 


Number remaining Nov. 30, 1911, ..... 






165 



Table 2. — Civil Condition of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




63 


75 


138 


Single 


82 


88 


ITO 


Widowed, 


6 


8 


14 




1 




1 


Totals 


152 


171 


323 



Table 3. — Ages of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1 to 13 years, 


3 


9 


12 


14 to 20 years, 


22 


27 


49 




49 


83 


132 


31 to 40 years, 


46 


38 


84 




23 


11 


34 


51 to 60 years 


7 


2 


9 


61 to 70 years 


2 


1 


3 


Totals 


152 


171 


323 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 75 



Table 4. — Nativity and Parentage of Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


PLACES OF NATIVITY. 


.2 


1 


^: 


;ient. 


u 
1 






1 


ther. 




c3 
pL. 




o 




ca 
fa 






ca 
fa 


o 


United States: — 




















Massachusetts, .... 


76 


16 


20 


81 


29 


25 


157 


45 


45 


New England States, 


13 


7 


5 


16 


10 


8 


29 


23 


13 


Other States, 


8 


2 


2 


2 


7 


3 


10 


9 


5 


Total native, .... 


97 


25 


27 


99 


46 


36 


196 


77 


63 


Other countries: — 




















Austria 


2 


1 


1 


3 


4 


2 


5 


5 


3 


Canada, ...... 


12 


6 


8 


19 


17 


25 


31 


23 


33 


Denmark, 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


England, 


4 


3 


4 


2 


6 


5 


6 


9 


9 


Finland, ...... 


2 


5 


4 


14 


10 


5 


16 


15 


9 


Greece, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


Germany, ..... 


2 


1 


3 


- 


- 


2 


2 


1 


5 


Ireland, ...... 


14 


27 


20 


16 


15 


25 


30 


42 


45 


Italy, 


3 


5 


6 


3 


3 


5 


6 


8 


11 


Norway, 


1 


1 


2 




1 


2 


2 


2 


A 
t 


Poland, 




2 


3 




3 


3 


1 


5 


6 


Russia 


2 




R 
V 


5 




2 


7 


A 
% 


8 , 


Sweden, 


4 


3 


3 


6 


5 


3 


10 


8 


6 


Scotland, 


4 


5 


4 


3 


4 


3 


7 


9 


7^ 


Switzerland, 


1 


















Turkey, 


1 












1 






Total foreign, .... 


54 


61 


66 


73 


71 


82 


127 


130 


148 


Unknown, 




65 


58 




55 


54 




116 


112 


Totals 


151 


151 


151 


172 


172 


172 


323 


323 


323 



76 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 

Table 5. — Residence of Patients admitted. 



Place. 


Number. 


1 

Place. 


Number. 


Adams, 


9 


Medford, 


1 


Adamsville, 


1 


Millbury, 




Annisquam, 


1 


Milford 




Ashburnham, .... 


1 


Mill River 


1 


Athol, 




Millers Falls 


1 


Atlantic, 


1 


MiUville, . . . . 




Baldwinsville, .... 


1 


Maynard, 


1 


Bay State, 


1 


Marlborough, .... 


1 


Barre 


1 


Newbury port, .... 


1 


Boston, 




Northampton, .... 




Cambridge, 


1 


North Adams, .... 




Chester, 


1 


North Dana, .... 


1 


Chicopee, 


7 


North Brookfield, 


1 


Clinton, 


1 


Northfield, 


1 


Dalton, 




North Grafton, .... 




Deerfield 


1 


Orange, 


7 


Easthampton, .... 


1 


Oxford, 


1 . 


East Weymouth, .... 


1 


Petersham, 


1 


East Douglas 


1 


Pittsfield, 




Erving, 


1 


Rutland 


1 


Fairview, 


1 


Roslindale, 


1 


Fit<;hburg 


25 


Revere, 




Gardner, 


13 


Roxbury, 


1 


Great Barrington, 


1 


Sheffield 


1 


Greenfield, 


1 


Somerville, 


2 


Haverhill, 


1 


Southbridge, .... 


2 


Housatonic, 


1 


Spencer, 


2 


Holyoke, 


21 


Springfield 


45 


Jefferson, 


1 


Sterling Junction, 


1 


Lanesborough 




Taunton, 


1 


Lawrence 


1 


Upton, 




Lee, 


1 


Wales 


1 


Lenox, 




Ware, 




Lowell 




Waltham, 




Lunenburg, 




Wakefield, 




Lynn, 




Webster, 




Merrimac, 




Westfield 


9 


Merrick, 




West Quincj% .... 


1 


Melrose, 




Worcester, 


67 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 77 



Table 6. — Occupations. 







EC 


OB 






S 
"3 






"3 








J 


c 
o 




















Attendant, 




2 


2 j 


Meat cutter, 


1 




1 


At home, .... 




3 


3 


Milliner, .... 




1 


1 


Barber, .... 


3 




3 1 


Mill hand. 


5 


10 


15 


Bookkeeper, 


2 




2 


Nurse girl. 




I 


1 


Brass worker, . 








Nurse, .... 






2 


Butler 


2 




2 


Paper maker, . 








Carriage maker. 


1 






Packer, .... 


1 






Carpenter, 


4 




4 


Painter, .... 


2 




2 


Chef, .... 


2 




2 


Plumber, 


1 






Chair maker, . 


2 




2 


Porter, .... 






\ 


Clerk, .... 


9 


8 


17 


Paper hanger, . 


1 






Cloak maker, . 




1 


1 


Railroad ensjiineer. 


1 




1 


Conductor, 


3 




3 


Roofer, .... 


2 




2 


Comb maker, . 


1 




1 


Rubber worker, 


1 




1 


Dish washer. 


1 




1 


Salesman, 


2 




2 


Designer, .... 


1 






School-teacher, 




1 


2 


Dressmaker, 




3 


I 


Shoemaker, 


3 




a 


Elevator man, 


1 






Slate roofer. 


2 




2 


Electrician, 


1 




1 


Steel presser. 


1 




1 


Expressman, 


1 




1 


Stenographer, . 




7 


7 


Factory hand. 


8 


15 


23 


Stone worker, . 






1 


Farmer 


2 




2 


Student, .... 


3 


13 


16 


Frame fitter, 


1 






Storekeeper, 


1 






Freight shipper. 


1 




1 


Steam fitter, 


1 






Grinder, .... 






1 


Tailor, .... 


1 




1 


Grocer 


3 




3 


Teamster 


7 




7 


Housework, 




32 


32 


Telephone operator. 




2 


2 


Housewife, 






64 


Timekeeper, 


3 




3 


Iron molder, 






1 


Waitress 




5 


5 


Janitor, .... 


2 




2 


Waiters 


5 




5 


Laborer, .... 


8 


- 


8 


Watchman, 




- 


1 


Landlady, 






1 


Ward maid, 




1 




Lineman, 


2 




2 


Weaver, .... 


7 




7 


Lithographer, . 


1 




1 


Wire worker. 


3 




3 


Mail carrier. 


1 




1 


Wood turner, 


1 




1 


Mechanic, 


16 




16 


Wood carver, 


1 




1 


Metal polisher. . 


1 




1 











78 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 7. — Condition on Admission. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




26 


32 


58 




29 


41 


70 




95 


94 


189 


Non-tuberculous, 


3 


4 


6 




152 


171 


323 



Table 8. — Condition of Discharges. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Disease arrested 


26 


47 


73 


Improved, 


35 


51 


86 


Unimproved, 


30 


48 


78 


Died 


47 


32 


69 


Non-tuberculous 


4 


5 


9 


Totals, 


142 


173 


315 



Table 9. — Deaths. 





Duration of Disease. 


Sanatoeium Residence. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Under 1 month, 








8 


3 


11 


1 to 3 months. 




1 


1 


15 


7 


23 


3 to 6 months, 


5 


2 


7 


7 


5 


12 


6 to 9 months. 


5 


4 


9 


7 


4 


11 


9 months to 1 year. 


11 


3 


14 


3 


3 


6 


1 to 2 years, .... 


14 


7 


21 


4 


3 




2 to 5 years, .... 


7 


7 


14 








5 to 10 years, .... 


2 


1 


3 








Totals, .... 


44 


25 


69 


44 


25 


69 





1911.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. 79 



RUTLAND STATE S.iXATORIUM. 



CONSULTING LARYNGOLOGIST. 

A. C. GETCHELL, M.D., . . . TTorcester. 



RESIDENT MEDICAL OFFICERS. 



P. CHALLIS BARTLETT,, M.D.. 
JAMES A. LYOX, M.D.. 
JOHX M. WISE, M.D., . 
HERBERT F. GAMMONS, M.D.. 
TLAREXCE T. MURPHY, . 



Superintendent. 

Physician. 

Physician. 

Physician. 

Bacteriologist. 



MARY E. THRASHER, . 

CHARLES E. CARROLL, 
\YALTER C. BROWX, . 
FREDERICK H. DRURY, 



. Matron and Superintend- 
ent of Surses. 
. Steward. 
. Chief Engineer. 
. Farmer. 



so 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — The following is the report for 
the year ending Nov. 30, 1911. 

There were 531 patients admitted and 542 discharged during 
the year. The daily average number was 345, — the largest 
since the sanatorium opened. 

The 'total expenditure for the year was $178,781.20 as 
against $187,963.11 for the year previous. 

There has been an increase of nearly 50 per cent, in the num- 
ber of bed cases treated. 

There were 52 deaths. 

Despite the increase in bed cases, the total expenditure for 
the year was $9,181.91 less than the year preceding. This 4 
decrease in the amount expended was principally due to the con- 
stantly increasing efficiency in the handling and distributing 
of food supplies received, and to the decrease in the amount of 
waste, due to the greafer efficiency in the serving of food at meal 
times ; also to the fact that some of the staple supplies cost less 
during a few months of the year. 

The total weekly per capita cost was $9.93. 

The average age of patients admitted was twenty-eight years, 
seven months ; men, twenty-nine years, two months, and women 
twenty-eight years, 1 month. 

The average length of stay of considered discharged cases was 
six months, thirteen days. 

Per Cent. 

Discharged as " apparently cured," 18.96 

Discharged as " arrested," 31.33 

Discharged as " improved," ' . . 29.54 

Discharged as "not improved," . . . . . . 20.15 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



81 



The average gain in weight for the year was, men, 11% 
pounds, women, 10 poimds. The gi^eatest individual gains were 
those of a woman, 55 pounds, and a man, 52 pounds. 

This sanatorium has been running thirteen years, and in that 
time 8,649 patients have been admitted. 

The subsequent history of patients admitted during the first 
five years has just been completed, and gives us some very in- 
teresting figures : — 

Of the class of 1899, 21.1 per cent, are able to work. 

Of the class of 1900, 24.5 per cent, are able to work. 

Of the class of 1901, 25.2 per cent, are able to work. 

Of the class of 1902, 24.3 per cent, are able to work. 

Of the class of 1903, 20.5 per cent, are able to work. 

This means doing a full day's work. 

These same years show that of the class of 1899, 1 per cent, 
are not able to work, 23.7 per cent, are not traced, and 54 per 
cent, have died. Of the class of 1900, 1 per cent, are not able 
to work, 27.5 per cent, are not traced, and 46.8 per cent, have 
died. Of the class of 1901, .5 per cent, are not able to w.ork, 
28.8 per cent, are not traced, and 48.4 per cent, have died. Of 
the class of 1902, 1.4 per cent, are not able to work, 35.8 per 
cent, not traced, and 38.4 per cent, have died. Of the class of 
1903, 1.4 per cent, are not able to work, 40.5 per cent, not 
traced, and 37.5 per cent, have died. 

This large number of patients, some of whom have worked 
for eleven years since their discharge from this Sanatorium, 
have in this time earned the cost of the State's investment. 
Besides this, there is no better teacher in the tuberculosis work 
than the discharged ex-patient. 

The general medical work during the past year has differed 
somewhat from previous years, because of the great number of 
bed cases. Tuberculines and vaccines are being used in about 
70 cases on an average. Tuberculin is used, as in former years, 
on cases that seem to need the stimulation, or where tubercular 
glands are a complication of the lung condition. 

The amount of work done in the laboratory has steadily in- 
creased, and it is of the utmost value and assistance in all of our 



S2 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSUAJPTIVES. [Dec. 



medical work on the wards. One hundred autogenous bacterial 
vaccines have been made and used, with goods results, in the 
secondary infections, and a verv large number of stock vaccines 
are constantly being used. 

The routine sputum and urine work is constantly being car- 
ried on, and the sputum examinations alone total 4.000 a year. 

The laboratory also furnished a large amount of buttermilk 
for the wards. The organism we are now using to prepare this 
buttermilk gives us the most satisfactory product we have ever 
used, and is a decided benefit in the treatment of many cases 
with intestinal disturbance. 

The replacing of the Akron sewer pipe with iron pipe is more 
than haK completed, and a great decrease in the amount of 
surface water emptied onto our sewer beds has already been 
noticed. The rest of this work will be completed in the early 
spring. 

The new veranda on the infirmary is being built, and will be 
completed in the early winter. 

A new 50 kilowatt dynamo and engine to rtm it have I'een 
contracted for and will soon be in place. 

A saw table and motor to run it have been contracted for and 
are now being set up. 

The coming year I wish to ask for the following special ap- 
propriations : — 

Eight thousand nine hundred and Mty dollars for a horse 
bam (in wood). The present horse barn is badly out of repair, 
and the frame is in such a condition that it does not seem an 
economy to spend much money repairing it. 

The mile of road across the sanatoritim grounds needs re- 
building. The State engineer's office estimates that it vrill cost 
Sl.-iOO to do this work properly. 

The nurses' home has no hydrant near it. TVe also need more 
hose and fire extinguishers. To do this work would cost $10'''. 

TTe are doing a great amount of repairing on most of otir 
buildings, and need more room in our carpenter shop, and more 
machinery. I should like to ask for $1,200 for this ptirpose. 
$700 for the addition to the carpenter shop, and $500 for 
machinery. 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 77. S3 

There have been no changes in our medical staff during the 
past year. 

I wish to thank the many friends of the sanatorium for their 
unfailing generosity during the year. I am indebted to the 
officers and many of the faithful employees who have assisted 
in conducting the operations of the sanatorium. 

I wish to express my personal gratitude to your Board for 
their assistance and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. CHALLIS BAETLETT. 



84 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER. 



To the Trustees of Rutland State Sanatorium. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of this 
institution for the fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1911: — 

Cash Account. 

Balance Dec. 1, 1911 . . S2,o66 92 



Receipts. 



Institution Receipts. 



Board of inmates : — 

Private, .... S26,443 06 

Reimbursements, insane, 

(charitable association), . 455 91 

Cities and towns, . . . 16,399 27 
Reimbursements, charitable 

(State aid), ... 586 77 



Sales : — 

Food, .... SI, 250 73 

Clothing and materials, . 122 90 

Furnishings, ... 3 37 

Repairs and improvements, . 10 38 

Miscellaneous, . . . 970 48 
Farm, stable and grounds: — 

Cows and calves, . . 319 75 

Pigs and hogs, . . . 1,399 85 

Sundries 19 92 



Miscellaneous receipts : — 

Interest on bank balances, . $148 41 

Sundries 101 89 



$43,885 01 



4,097 38 



250 30 

48,232 69 



Receipts from Treasury of Commonwealth. 
Maintenance appropriations : — 

Deficiency, 1910, $3,963 11 

Balance of 1910, 133 86 

Advance money (amount on hand Novem- 
ber 30), 10,000 00 

Approved schedules of 1911, $160,665 11 
Less returned, . . 46 42 



160,618 69 

174,715 



Special appropriations, ........ 2,774 45 



Total, 



$228,289 72 



1911. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 7 



85 



Payments. 

To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts, 
Maintenance appropriations: — 

Balance November schedule, 1910, 

Eleven months schedules, 1911, . 

November advances, ..... 

Special appropriations : — 

Approved schedules, less advances, last j-ear's 
report, ....... 

November advances, . . ' . 



Balance Nov. 
In bank. 
In office. 



30, 1911: — 



6,663 89 
160,618 69 
5,032 76 



82,774 45 
251 64 



$4,294 05 
421 55 



848,232 69 



172,315 34 



3,026 09 



4,715 60 



Total, 



8228,289 72 



Maintenance. 



Appropriation, . 

Expenses (as analyzed below), 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth, 



8184,000 00 
178,781 20 

85,218 80 



Analysis of Expenses 

Salaries, wages and labor: — 
General administration, 
Medical ser\'ice, . 
Ward service (male), . 
Ward service (female). 
Repairs and improvements. 
Farm, stable and grounds. 



Food: 



Butter, 
Butterine, . 
Beans, 

Bread and crackers, 

Cereals, rice, meal, etc, 

Cheese, 

Eggs, 

Flour, 

Fish, 

Fruit (dried and fresh) 

Meats, 

Milk, 

Molasses and syrup. 
Sugar, 

Tea, coffee, broma and 
Vegetables, 
Sundries, . 



841,265 79 

4,210 68 

1,459 05 

6,457 61 

2,164 13 

8,087 11 



$4,802 07 
163 21 
145 16 
77 56 
696 56 
93 79 
9,247 27 
2,115 60 
1,978 50 
2,348 58 
28,290 97 
8,902 38 
43 20 
2,425 19 
1,057 98 
4,043 36 
384 40 



863,644 37 



66.815 78 



Amount carried forward, 



8130,460 15 



86 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, 



S130.460 15 



Clothing and materials : — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers, 

Clothing, 

Dry goods for clothing and small wares, 
Hats and caps, .... 

Furnishings: — 

Beds, bedding, table linen, etc., 

Brushes, brooms. 

Carpets, rugs, etc., 

Crockerj', glassware, cutlery, etc., 

Furniture and upholstery. 

Kitchen furnishings. 

Wooden ware, buckets, pails, etc.. 

Sundries, ..... 



Heat, light and power: — 
Coal, 

Transportation of coal, 

Wood, 

Oil, 

Sundries, . 



Repairs and improvements; — 
Brick, .... 
Cement, lime and plaster, 
Doors, sashes, etc.. 
Electrical work and supplies. 
Hardware, 

Lumber, .... 
Machinery, etc.. 
Paints, oil, glass, etc., . 
Plumbing, steam fitting and supplies. 
Roofing and materials, 
Sundries, .... 

Farm, stable and grounds: — 
Blacksmith and supplies. 
Carriages, wagons, etc., and repairs. 
Fertilizers, vines, seeds, etc., 
Hay, grain, etc.. 
Harnesses and repairs. 
Horses, .... 
Other live stock. 
Tools, farm machines, etc., . 
Sundries, .... 

Miscellaneous: — 

Books, periodicals, etc.. 

Chapel ser\'ices and entertainments. 

Freight, expressage and transportation, 

Funeral expenses. 

Hose, etc., ..... 



S18 70 
62 89 
25 
1 25 



S4,816 78 
203 53 
110 97 
867 16 
258 20 
687 54 
118 44 
121 84 



810,762 98 
1,656 90 
80 75 
2.38 11 
498 94 



S164 69 
224 15 
266 73 
524 31 
283 69 
266 83 
29 28 
884 50 
721 98 
48 40 
373 11 



S193 55 
457 90 

1,004 78 

5,178 20 
151 30 
300 00 

1,040 90 
91 97 
977 74 



$129 34 
596 50 
893 67 
20 00 
15 00 



83 09 



7,184 46 



13,237 



3,787 67 



9,396 34 



Amounts carried forward, 



Sl,654 51 8164,149 39 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



87 



Amounts brought forward, 



Sl,654 51 §164,149 39 



Miscellaneous — Con. 

Medicines and hospital supplies, . 
Medical attendance, nurses, etc. (extra) 
Postage, ..... 

f Printing and printing supplies, 

Return of runaways, cuspidor supplies, 
Soap and laundry supplies, . 
Stationery and office supplies, 
Travel and expenses (officials), 
Telephone and telegraph, 
Water, ..... 
Sundries, ..... 



3,S30 46 
15 00 
699 40 
610 17 

1,541 79 

1,347 26 
617 04 
167 83 
840 99 

2,663 29 
644 07 



14,G31 81 



Total expenses for maintenance", 



§178,781 20 



Special Appropriations. 

Appropriations for fiscal year, ....... $7,945 00 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed), . . . 2,774 45 

Balance Xovember 30, 1911, §5,170 55 



Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand §4,715 60 

November cash vouchers (paid from advance money) : — 
Maintenance, .... §5,032 76 

Special, 251 64 

■■ 5,284 ''0 

Due from treasury of Commonwealth account No- 
vember, 1911, schedule, .... 8,162 51 

§18,162 51 

Liabilities. 

Schedule of November bills, ....... §18,162 51 



Per Capita. 

During the year the average number of inmates has been 345. 

Total cost for maintenance, §178,781.20. 

Equal to a weekly per capita cost of S9.933. 

Receipts from sales, §4,097.38. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of 80.226. 

All other institution receipts, §44,135.31. 

Equal to a weekly per capita of §2.460. 



88 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



I 



C =3 



^O.'rt^OOOOOCO 
(MOOCOOOiOCO 

00 T-i O r-< 00 CO 



O O (M 
t- O O CO 

CO 00 00 C5 
€^CO CO 
rH CM !>. 



I I 



(M O 

to 00 
(M CO 

1— I Tjl 



uo O CO <M 
O O) CO 

CO 00 00 o 
^CO 05 CO 
T-H (M 1>- 



i I 



(M O 

o 00 
<M CO 



OOOOOOOO 
O O O O 0,0 O O 

OOiOiOiOOOO 
lO O CO CO Cfl o »o 
00COO5C100COT— 1-^ 



OOOOOOOO 



^^^^^^^^ 
OOOOOOOO 



72 



CO 



CO 



• 

1-^ £ ^ S a 



^ I 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIENT — No. 77. 



89 



VALUATION. 



IxVENTORr. 

Land. 



GrouDds and building sites, 12 acres, . $6,000 00 

Woodland, 88 acres, 2,816 00 

Mowing, 99 acres, 8,910 00 

Tillage, 37 acres, 3,330 00 

Pasture, 108 acres, 2,376 00 

Roads and sewerage sj'stem, . . . 20,000 00 

Miscellaneous, 21 acres, .... 2,100 00 



Total, . . . . , $45,532 00 



Buildings. 

Institution buildings, $443,181 00 

Farm, stable and grounds. .... 20,620 00 
Miscellaneous, 3,800 00 

Total, 467,601 00 

Grand total, $513,133 00 



Statement of Peesext Value of All Persoxal Property as per 



IXVEXTORY TAKEX DeC 

Food, 

Clothing and clothing material 
Furnishings, 
Heat, light and power. 
Repairs and improvements 
Farm, stable and grounds. 
Miscellaneous, 



1, 1911. 



Total, 



$41,549 06 



90 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Finances. 

Total appropriation for maintenance for 1911, 
Total expenditures for maintenance in 1911, 

Salaries, wages and labor, . 

All other expenses, 
Average weekly per capita cost, 
Total valuation of real estate, . 

Land, 

Buildings, .... 
Total valuation of personal estate, 
Total appropriation for special purposes, 1911, 



$63,644 37 
115,136 83 



$45,532 
467,601 



Total expenditures for spec 
Dynamo, 
Machinery, . 
Iron pipe, . . 
Veranda, 
Covering bridge, 
Ambulance, . 



al purposes, 1911, 



$3 75 
138 00 
1,298 96 
769 62 
125 42 
438 70 



$184,000 00 
178,781 20 



9.933 
513,133 00 



41,549 
7,945 
2,744 



06 
00 

45 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — No. 77. 



91 



FAKM ACCOUNT. 



Dr. 



Products of the farm on hand, as estimated Dec. 

1, 1910, 

Stock on hand, as estimated Dec. 1, 1910, 



General expense : — 
Blacksmith, 
Coal, 
Fertilizer, 
Hardware, 
Harness repairs, 
Hay and grain, 
Horse, 
Labor, 

Other live stock, 
Seed, shrubbery, etc. 
Shavings, 
Sundries, . 
Teaming (outside), 
Tools, 



Material, etc., produced by 
of sanatorium for farm depar 
Board of employees, . 
Engineer department. 
Painter department, . 
Waste, sanatorium kitchen, 



S122 00 
124 91 
843 75 
10 03 
119 50 

3,S44 82 
300 00 

5,991 11 
232 00 

122 66 
61 03 

123 73 
543 06 

37 74 



her departments 
ment : — 

Sl,552 50 
1 00 
1 00 
200 60 



82,277 10 
314 26 



812,476 34 



1,755 10 



,591 36 



14,231 44 



816,822 SO 



Cr. 

Produce of farm delivered to sanatorium: — 
Apples, 11 barrels, at 82.25 to 83.50, . 
Beets, 112^ bushels, at 80.75 to 81.25, 
Beans (wax), 17 bushels, at 80.75 to 81.00, 
Beans (shell), 17 bushels, at 81.00, 
Celery (season), 13 bushels, at 80.50, . 
Cucumbers (pickHng), 1,986, at 80.00^ 
Cucumbers, 181 i dozen, at 80.20, 



829 85 
87 38 

16 50 

17 00 
6 50 

49 33 
36 30 



Amount carried forward, 



8242 86 



92 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Amount brought forward, 



iS242 86 



Carrots, 142 1 bushels, at S0.60 to S2.40, 

Cabbage, 5,426 pounds, at SO.Ol to S0.02, . 

Corn, 7,745 dozen, at SO.IO to S0.12, . 

Cauliflower, 69 dozen, at Sl.OO to SI. 50, 

Cider, 10 gallons, at S0.08, 

Lettuce, 227 dozen, at S0.36 to S0.75, . 

Leeks, 30 bunches, at $0.50, 

Milk, 124,312 quarts, at $0.04J, . 

Onions, 12§ bushels, at S0.43 to SI. 50, 

Onions (top), 1,039 bunches, at S0.04, 

Peppers, 3it bushels, at S0.75 to S1.75, 

Parsley, 3| pecks, at SI. 60, 

Parsnips, 19 bushels, at S0.90 to $1.50, 

Peas, 4 bushels, at SI. 50, .... 

Pork, 5,442 pounds, at $0.08 to SO.lOf, 

Rhubarb, 1,497 pounds, at $0.01, 

Radishes, 2,489 bunches, at SO.02^, 

Squash (summer), 113| dozen, at $0.20 to $0.30, 

Squash (marrow), 2,889 pounds, atS.OOf to $0.01f , 

Squash (winter), 1,378 pounds, at SO.Ol to $0.01 i, 

Spinach, 14 bushels, at $1.25, 

Tomatoes (green), 63 bushels, at $0.50, 

Tomatoes (ripe), 87tV bushels, at $1.00 to $2.00, 

Turnips, 136 bushels, at $0.45 to $1.25, 

Vinegar, 103 gallons, at $0.11, . 

Sales : — 

Live stock, cows and calves, .... 

Pork, 23,570 pounds, 

Hay and grain, ...... 

Sanatoriuna, board of dri\dng and express horses, 
5 at S20, 12 months, 

Service, labor and teaming for sanatorium, putting 
in ice, hauling pro\asions, filler beds, etc.. 



Stock: — 

Products of farm on hand, as estimated Dec. 1, 
Slock on hand Dec. 1, 1911, 



99 10 

61 98 
82 10 
88 00 

80 
109 08 

15 00 
5,594 04 

13 09 
41 56 
3 88 

5 60 
19 95 

6 00 
497 14 

22 48 

62 20 
29 45 
41 42 

16 70 

17 50 
31 50 

115 23 
75 08 
11 33 



$319 75 
1,399 85 
19 92 



1911, 



$1,200 00 
1,869 77 



$2,035 00 
543 75 



$7,303 07 



1,739 52 



3,069 77 



2,578 75 



$14,691 11 



Deficit against farm, 



$2,131 69' 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



93 



POULTEY DEPAKTMENT. 



Dr. 

Stock, $1,149 27 



General expense : — 



Grain and feed, . 


. $1,396 


17 


Poultry, 


. 807 


90 


Eggs, .... 


6 


88 


Water, 


5 


27 


Oil, .... 


9 


36 


Straw, 


8 


57 


Coal, .... 


52 


67 


Shavings, 


10 


08 


Sundries, 


14 


41 


Salaries and wages, . 


. 794 


78 



Repairs and improvements : — 

Lumber, 66 60 

Hardware, 40 

Roofing paper, .... 2 40 
Cement, etc., .... 2 18 

$3,177 67 



Material, etc., produced by other depart- 
ments of sanatorium for poultry de- 
partment : — 
Board of employees, . . . $310 67 
Farm department (teaming), . 74 55 



385 22 

3,562 89 



$4,712 16 



94 



HOSPITALS FOR COXSOIPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



Cr. 

Products of poultry department delivered to sanatorium : — 



Poultry, 3,717 pounds, 
Eg-g's, 6,890^2 dozen, . 
Fertilizer, 186 barrels, 
54 loads, . 

Sundries, 

Stock: — 
Eggs, .... 
Grain and feed, . 
Poultry, 
Sundries, 



$553 03 
1,758 59 
93 00 
27 00 
3 51 



$2 70 
69 17 
1,574 44 
12 74 



$2,435 13 



Deficit against poultry department, . 



$4,094 18 
$617 98 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



95 



SPECIAL REPORT. 



The following special report is prepared in accordance with a 
resolution of the National Conference of Charities and Correc- 
tions, adopted May 15, 1906 : — 



Population. 



Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients present at beginning of fiscal year, 


178 


172 


340 




254 


277 


531 




255 


287 


542 


Number of deaths included in preceding item, 


37 


15 


52 


Number at end of fiscal year, 


177 


162 


339 


Daily average attendance (i.e.), number of inmates actually 


179 


166 


345 


present during year. 








Average number of officers and employees during year, 


125 


76 


201 



Expenditures 

Current expenses : — 

1. Salaries and wages, 

2. Clothing, .... 

3. Subsistence, 

4. Ordinary repairs, . 

5. Office, domestic and outdoor 

penses. 



^63,644 37 

83 09 

66,815 78 

3,787 67 

44,450 29 



Extraordinary expenses: — 

1. Permanent improvements to existing buildings, 



$178,781 20 
769 62 



Grand total. $179,550 82 



96 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Table 1. — Admissions and Discharges. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Number of patients in sanatorium Dec. 1, 1910, . 


178 


172 


340 


Number admitted Nov. 30, 1910, to Dec. 1, 1911, . 


254 


277 


531 


Number discharged Nov. 30, 1910, to Dec. 1, 1911, 


255 


287 


542 


Number remaining in sanatorium Nov. 30, 1911, . 


177 


162 


339 


Daily average number of patients, 


179 


166 


345 


Died (included in number discharged), .... 


37' 


15 


52 





Table 2. — Monthly Admissions and Discharges with Average Monthly 

Population. 



Month. 


Admitted. 


DiSCHAKGED. 


Daily 
Average. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


1910. 
















December, 


28 


20 


48 


31 


24 


55 


345 


1911. 
















January, . 


30 


24 


54 


27 


25 


52 


344 


February, 


18 


20 


38 


15 


20 


35 


346 


March, 


11 


22 


33 


11 


24 


35 


347 


April, 


19 


18 


37 


27 


18 


45 


343 


May, 


41 


40 


81 


33 


43 


76 


339 


June, 


17 


22 


39 


11 


20 


31 


350 


July, 


11 


15 


26 


17 


11 


28 


347 


August, 


19 


23 


42 


17 


28 


45 


345 


September, 


15 


36 


51 


20 


32 


52 


343 


October, . 


21 


17 


38 


23 


20 


43 


345 


November, 


24 


20 


44 


23 


22 


45 


346 


Totals, 


254 


277 


531 


255 


287 


542 







1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT - 


-No. 77. 


97 


Table 3. — Admissions and Discharges since 


the Opening 


oj the Sana- 


foriiiiT), 








Number. 


Per Cent. 




8 649 






8 310 






1 540 






6 770 






3 257 


48. 10 




2.792 


41.24 


Not improved, 


721 


10.66 




123 





Table 4. — Civil Condition oj Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Single, 


147 


145 


292 


Married, 


102 


110 


212 


Widowed, 


3 


20 


23 


Divorced, 


2 


1 


3 


Separated, 




1 


1 


Totals, 


254 


277 


631 



Table 5. — Age oj Patients admitted. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Under 14 years, 




2 


2 


14 to 20 years 


43 


43 


86 




106 


124 


230 


30 to 40 years 


70 


76 


146 


40 to 50 years 


24 


30J 


54 




11 


2 


13 


Total 


254 


277 


531 



98 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 6. — Stage of Disease at Admission. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Per Cent. 


Incipient, 


40 


84 


124 


23.35 


Moderately advanced, 


138 


123 


261 


49.15 


Far advanced 


67 


59 


126 


23.74 




9 


11 


20 


3.76 


Totals, 


254 


277 


531 















Table 7. — Nativity of Patients admitted. 



Patients born in — 




ales. 


i 


Fathers born in — 




ales. 


m 






S 














1 




1 






1 


O 

H 


United States, , 


188 


193 


381 


United States, . 








Ireland, .... 


13 


20 


33 


Ireland, .... 


64 


46 


110 


Canada, .... 


10 


23 


33 


Canada, .... 


13 


21 


34 


Russia, .... 


12 


11 


23 


Russia 


3 


2 


5 


Sweden 


6 


8 


14 


Sweden 


8 


2 


10 


Germany, 


3 


2 


5 


Germany, 


8 


7 


15 


Scotland, .... 


3 


2 


5 


Scotland, .... 


1 


3 


4 


England, . . . 


9 


9 


18 


England, .... 


6 


6 


12 


Italy, .... 


4 


1 


5 


Italy, .... 


2 


2 


4 


Prince Edward Island, 




3 


3 


Prince Edward Island, 


1 


1 


2 


Austria, .... 


2 




2 


Austria 




1 


1 


France, .... 








France, .... 


2 




2 


Newfoundland, 


2 


1 


3 


Newfoundland, 


3 




3 


Portugal, .... 


1 




2 


Portugal, .... 








Turkey, .... 




1 


1 


Turkey, .... 








Syria, .... 


1 




1 


Syria, .... 








Norway, .... 








Norway, .... 


1 




1 


Finland, . . . 




2 


2 


Finland 


1 




1 


Azores 








Azores, .... 


1 




1 


Totals, . . . 


254 


277 


531 


Totals, 


114 


91 


205 



Table 8. — Residence of Patients admitted. 



Cities and Towns. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Cities and Towns. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Boston, .... 


86 


86 


172 


New Bedford, . 


1 


2 


3 


Worcester, 


21 


20 


41 


Lawrence, 


5 


6 


11 


Cambridge, 


7 


10 


17 


Pittsfield, .... 


2 




2 


Lynn, .... 


9 


11 


20 


Gardner, .... 


2 


5 


7 


Brockton 


7 


1 


8 


Fitchburg, 


3 


4 


7 


Somerville, 


4 


4 


8 


Haverhill, 


4 


1 


5 


Attleborough, . 


7 


10 


17 


Maiden, .... 


4 


6 


10 


Fall River, 


4 


5 


9 


Springfield, 


3 


4 


7 


Lowell, .... 


4 


6 


10 


Hyde Park, 


3 


1 


4 



1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 99 



Table 8. — Residence of Patients admitted — Continued. 



CrriEs AND Towns, 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Cities and Towns. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Chelsea, .... 


3 


3 


C 


Barre, .... 




1 


1 


Bnxtkline, 






1 


Newburyport, . 


3 


1 


4 


Everett, .... 


4 


3 


7 


North Grafton, 


2 




2 


Salem, .... 




3 


5 


Shelbume, 




1 


1 


Athol 




1 


1 


Northampton, . 




2 


2 


Arlington, 




2 


2 


Quincy, .... 


1 


^ 


2 


Holyoke 


2 


3 


5 


Easton, .... 




2 


2 


Watertown, 


1 


1 


2 


Sutton, .... 


1 


1 


2 


Framingham, . 


1 


2 


3 


Medway, .... 


1 






Gloucester, 


2 




2 


Spencer 


1 






Waltham 


5 




5 


Winchendon, 




2 


2 


Wobiim, .... 


^ 


3 


4 


Holliston 




1 


1 


Revere, .... 


1 




^ 


Chicopee Falls, 




1 


^ 


Newton, .... 


2 


2 


4 


Webster 




1 


2 


Rutland 


7 


10 


17 


Marlborough, . 


1 


3 


4 


Medford, .... 


3 


4 


7 i 


Beverly, .... 




3 


3 


Milton 


3 




3 


Winchester, 


1 




1 


Manomet, 




1 


1 


MiUville 


1 


1 


2 


Canton, .... 






^ 


Milford 


3 


2 


5 


North Chelmsford, . 






1 


Stoughton, 


1 




1 


Westminster, 


^ 




1 


Rockland, 


2 


2 


4 


Saugiis, .... 


1 




^ 


Whitman, .... 


3 


3 


6 


Holden, .... 


1 




1 


Hopedale, 


1 




2 " 


Amherst, .... 


1 




1 


Hudson, .... 


^ 


1 


2 


Lenox, .... 




1 




Amesbury, 


2 




2 


Cohasset, .... 






1 


Otter River, 




1 




Taunton, .... 


1 


_ 




Bj-field, .... 


_ 


1 


1 


Brookfield, 




2 


2 


Baldwinsville, . 




2 


2 


HuU 


1 






Methuen, .... 




1 




Turners Falls, . 




1 


1 


Needham, 




1 


2 


West Dennis, . 




1 


1 


South Yarmouth, 




1 


1 


Leominster, 




1 


1 


Norwood, .... 


1 






Braintree, 


1 






Plymouth, 






1 


Auburn, . . . . 








Franklin 


1 




1 


Wollaston, 




1 


1 


West Wrentham, 


1 




1 


Northbridge, . 




1 


1 


Groton, . . . . 




1 


1 



100 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 8. — Residence of Patients admitted — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Cities and Towns. 


Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Walpole, .... 


1 


1 


2 


Wakefield, 




1 


1 


North Andover, 


1 




1 


Ipswich, .... 




1 


2 


Reading 




2 


2 


Totals, 


254 


277 


531 


EastlDennis, 




1 


1 












Table 9.— 


Occupations. 










Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Auctioneer, 


1 






Factory 


61 


47 


109 


Attendant, 


4 


5 


9 


Farmer, .... 


2 




2 


Barber, .... 


3 




3 


Fireman, .... 


1 






Bartender, 


3 




3 


Governess, 




1 


1 


Blacksmith, 


3 




3 


General work, . 


6 


4 


10 


Bookbinder, 






1 


Housewife, 




110 


110 


Bookkeeper, 


3 


5 


8 


Housework, 




10 


10 


Bootblack, 


1 




1 


Insurance, 


1 






Brakeman, . . . 


1 






Iron worker, 


3 




3 


Bottler 


1 




1 


Janitor, .... 


2 




2 


Bundle girl. 




1 


1 


Laborer, .... 


6 




6 


Carpenter, 


5 




5 


Laundry. .... 




3 


2 


Chauffeur, 


3 




3 


Letter carrier, . 


2 




2 


Cigar maker, . 


3 




3 


Nursemaid, 




1 


1 


Clerk. .... 


24 


10 


34 


Machinist, 


8 




8 


Conductor, street railway, 


2 




2 


Mechanic, 


1 






Cook, .... 


1 


2 


3 


Milliner, .... 




1 


1 


Cutter, . . .• . 


1 




1 


Motorman, 


2 




2 


Civil engineer, . 






1 


No work, .... 




5 


5 


Dentist, .... 


1 




1 


Nurse, trained. 




4 


4 


Domestic, 




13 


13 


Nurse, student, 




1 


1 


Draughtsman, . 


3 




3 


Painter 


4 




4 


Dressmaker, 




5 


5 


Pedler 


5 




5 


Druggist, .... 


2 




2 


Photographer, . 


1 




1 


Errand boy. 






1 


Plasterer 


1 




1 


Elevator'man, . 






1 


Polisher, .... 


1 







1911.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 101 



Table 9. — Occupations — Concluded. 





Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 




Males. 


Females. 


Totals. 


Porter 








Upholsterer, 


2 




2 


Printer, .... 


2 




2 


Milk inspector, . 


1 




1 


Plumber, .... 


2 




2 


Electroplater, 


2 




2 


Press feeder . « 




1 


1 


Lineman, 


1 






Sailor, 


1 






Molder, 


1 






Salespeople, 


1 1 




on 


Silversmith, 


1 






Seamstress, . . 




n 

z 


o 

i 


Hostler, .... 


1 
1 






Shipper, .... 


c 
u 







Egg inspector, . 


1 
1 






Stenographer, 




5 


5 


Mason, .... 


1 






Stone cutter, 


3 




3 


Steam fitter. 


2 






Student, .... 


11 


19 


30 


Cable splicer. 








Tailor, .... 


3 




3 


Lecturer, .... 


1 






Teacher, school, 


2 


5 


7 


Bundle girl. 




1 




Teamster, 


16 




16 


Librarian, 








Telephone operator, 




2 


2 


Gardener, 








Tool maker. 


2 




2 


Merchant, 








Waiter, .... 


2 


3 


5 


Totals, 


254 


277 


521 


Baggage master, 


1 




1 













102 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 



C3 

CO 



0^ 



CO e«3 ui 

OS CC lO tH 



lO -^t" o 



»o O CO oo 
CO oo «o »o 



»-l <M U5 



00 O eo 

.H CO CO rH 



(M CO 



(M i£5 eO rH 



•sal's aia^ 



O to i-H 

01 00 rH 1-1 

lo CO oo' e^' 



CO o 



^ IM »-H 



I 

S I 

' * ■ ■ 'S fe 

s . . 1 

s I i g I I 1 

^ ^ M i I 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCmiEXT — No. 77. 



103 



Table 11. — Comparison of Percentages of Results of Treatment of In- 
cipient Cases since the Adoption of the National Association Classification. 





1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


Apparently cvired, .... 


39.2 


50.4 


56.1 


33.0 


61.5 


21.8 


35.9 


Arrested, 


46.7 


40.1 


26.8 


46.5 


25.6 


40.5 


33.8 




12.0 


8.9 


16.3 


17.3 


10.8 


28.6 


28.1 


Not improved, .... 


2.0 


.6 


.7 


3.0 


1.9 


9.0 


2.1 



Table 12. — Deaths, Duration of Disease, Length of Stay in Sanatorium, 
and Cause of Death. 



No. 


DUHATION. 


Length of Stay. 


Cause of Death. 


8111 


Unknown, . 


21 days 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


oUo/ 
7717 


18 montlis, 
XJnlcnown , 


1 month, 5 days, . 
6 months, 28 days. 


Tubercular pneumonia and pulmonary 

tuberculosis. 
Pulmonarj' tuberculosis. 


/yuo 


3 years, 


3 months, 27 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8037 


15 months, . 


2 months, 4 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


7B07 


5 montlis, . 


4 months, 8 days. 


Hemoptysis and pulmonarj" tuberculosis. 




6 months, 


4 montns, J4 daj s. 


Pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis. 


OlOO 


TJntnown , 


ua> s, . 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


SlOf 


TJnknown , 


lo days, .... 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 




8 months. 


18 months, 15 days. 


Pulmonarj' tuberculosis. 




TJnknown, . 


9 daj's, .... 


Nephritis and pulmonarj' tuberculosis. 


8020 


3 years, 


3 months, 17 days. 


Pulmonary- tuberculosis. 


7785 
8048 


Unknown , . 
11 months, . 


7 months, 24 days, 
3 months, 28 days, 


Arteriosclerosis, edema and pidmonar>' 

tuberculosis. 
Pulmonarj' tuberculosis. 


7914 


4 months, . 


6 months, 1 day, . 


Abdominal and pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8224 


Unknown, . 


1 month, 7 days, . 


Pulmonary- tuberculosis. 


8273 
8131 


Unknown, . 
Unknown, . 


1 day, .... 
3 months, 6 daj's. 


Pneumothorax and pulmonary tubercu- 
losis. 

Pulmonarj' tuberculosis. 


8161 


7 months, . 


2 months, 20 days. 


Pulmonarj- tuberculosis. 


8061 


1 year, 


4 months, 19 days, 


Hemoptysis and pulmonarj- tuberculosis. 


7499 
8163 


6 months, . 
1 year. 


11 months, 8 days, 
3 months, 18 days. 


Tubercular pneumonia and pulmonary 

tuberculosis. 
Larj-ngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis. 


7986 


6 months, . 


6 months, 20 days. 


Pulmonary- tuberculosis. 


8232 


1 year. 


2 months, 15 days. 


Pulmonary' tuberculosis. 


8239 


15 months, . 


2 months, 20 days. 


Larj-ngeal and pulmonary tuberculosia. 


8150 


13 months, . 


4 months, 13 daj-s. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8322 


Unknown, . 


23 days, .... 


Pulmonary- tuberculosis. 


8025 


8 months, . 


7 months, 3 days. 


Pulmonary' tuberculosis. 



104 HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. [Dec. 



Table 12. — Deaths, Duration of Disease, etc. — Concluded. 



No. 


Duration. 


Length of Stay. 


Cause of Death. 


8393 


Unknown, . 


19 days, .... 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8245 


6 months, 


4 months, 8 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8395 


Unknown, . 


1 month, 9 days, . 


Hiccough and pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8103 


10 months, . 


1 month, 13 days. 


Laryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8319 


10 months, . 


3 months, 9 days, 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8144 


5 years. 


7 months, 16 days, 


Laryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8165 


1 year, 


7 months, 6 days. 


Laryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8425 


4 years, 


2 months, 12 days, 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8488 
8124 


Unknown, . 
1 year, 


15 days 

9 months, 5 days. 


Tubercular pneumonia and pubnonarj 

tuberculosis. 
Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8179 


15 months, . 


8 months, 19 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8197 


9 months, . 


8 months, 9 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


7988 
8296 
8338 


Unknown, . 
30 months, . 
8 years, 


11 months, 29 days, 
6 months, 6 days, 
5 months, 20 days, 


Cancer of abdomen and pulmonary tuber- 
culosis. 

Pneumothorax and pulmonary tubercu- 
losis. 

Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8290 


7 years. 


7 months, 16 days, 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8505 
8596 


7 months. 
Unknown, , 


2 months, 18 days, 
25 days, .... 


Pneumothorax and pulmonary tubercu- 
losis. 

Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8436 


3 years, 


5 months, 


I^aryngeal and pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8095 


3 years, 


12 months, 


Pubnonarj' tuberculosis. 


8060 


1 year. 


11 months, 18 days, 


Hemoptysis and pulmonary tuberculosis. 


8458 


6 months, . 


4 months, 13 days. 


Tubercular pneumonia. 


6918 


3 years, 


30 months, 7 days. 


Pulmonary tuberculosis. 


7929 


6 years, 


14 months, 22 days. 


Pulmonarj' tuberculosis. 



1911.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 77. 



»o ^ o 

^ ^ tM 



Pi 



-H C<1 (M 



& a 5 

Pi 



o 



s ® ® « 



3 ja - 

© «s ft «s 

S <: s 



106 



HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 



[Dec. 1911. 





CO 


CO 




CO 

15 


eo 
oc 
»r> 


2,173 


•paiapisuoo ;^ou 




oo 


CO 

»o 






lO 




eo 


o 


eo 


o> 


03 


1,928 






54.0 


46.S 


4S.4 


38.4 


37.5 


44.3 1 


Dead. 




o 


CO 
CO 


CO 


CO 




»o 

oo 








CO 




eo 
oo 


ec 












eo 

05 


o 


lO 






23.7 


27.5 


25.8 


35.8 


40.5 


31.6 


lACED. 




o> 


g 


o 

00 


o 
>o 


OS 


§ 

CO 


Not Ti 




o> 
'ttl 


eo 


US 

»o 


a> 


o 


CO 

eo 
e<9 








00 


eo 




oo 
03 


eo 

<M 


i 




o 


o 


»o 








TO WO 






CO 


CS> 


CO 




§5 


< 






(M 




eo 


eo 


O 


O 










CO 










21.1 


24.5 


25.2 


24.3 


20.5 


22.9 


> WORK. 


•SIB!^OX 


00 




t~ 

oo 


o 


o 


<M 
■<*< 


O 
tr* 

^& 
>J 

n 




oo 






lO 


o> 




<1 




eo 
eo 




CO 






*a 



• • • I 

o 

. . - H 

<M eo